Language Selection

English French German Italian Portuguese Spanish

Ubuntu

Ubuntu, ownCloud, and a hidden dark side of Linux software repositories

Filed under
Ubuntu

The version of ownCloud in Ubuntu’s Universe repositories is old and full of “multiple critical security vulnerabilities.” It’s no secret. The ownCloud project itself asked Ubuntu to remove it so users wouldn’t have vulnerable server software. Ubuntu suggested to ownCloud they should take over maintaining it instead. OwnCloud thought that was ridiculous—they just want to write software and not maintain it in every distribution’s repositories.

Read more

Ubuntu GNOME 14.10: Unifying the Linux desktop

Filed under
GNOME
Ubuntu

As you may know, Ubuntu 14.10 came out with about as much fanfare as growing grass. If you're unsure why this happened, it's simple -- Ubuntu is in a state of holding because of Unity 8/Mir. Until that happens, Ubuntu version upgrades will be about bug fixes and not much more. It makes sense... why dump a bunch of time/effort into an interface that's about to undergo a radical shit?

Read more

Canonical Confirms Involvement in Ubuntu Linux Tablet

Filed under
Linux
Ubuntu

When news broke a few days ago about development of an Ubuntu Linux-based x86 tablet called the UT One, it seemed like Canonical was not part of the endeavor. But that's wrong, according to information from the man behind the project, who contacted The VAR Guy this week with more details on the open source mobile device.

Read more

Compiz 0.9.12 Released, Starts Porting GTK Window Decorator To GTK+ 3

Filed under
Ubuntu

While Compiz 1.0 might never be reached given its diminishing usage these days and bleak outlook with Unity 8 being designed around Mir, Compiz 0.9.12 was released today with some minor new developments.

Compiz 0.9.12 was released by Canonical's Stephen Webb and he says "it consists of mostly smaller bugfixes, as befits a mature andstable project." One new feature though to mention is that Compiz's GTK-Window-Decorator is being ported to the GTK+ 3 tool-kit from GTK2. The porting to GTK+ 3 should benefit newer desktop environments using GTK+ 3.

Read more

Ubuntu's Click Packages Might End the Linux Packaging Nightmare

Filed under
Ubuntu

Ubuntu is the most used Linux operating system, so it's very likely that, if something really catches on with users of this distribution, it will probably shake things up in the Linux ecosystem as well. For now, the app packaging for Linux operating systems is a mess. It has improved over the years, but it still poses many problems.

There isn't any kind of unification and different distros use different packages. Debian-based distros use .deb and Fedora-based ones use .rpm, but you can also find packages with .sh or .run. The main problem is that they depend very much on the libraries that are already installed or available in the repos. Even if you have a .deb file for your Ubuntu system, it's not a guarantee that it will work. It might very well depend on a library that's not available for that particular version.

Read more

Canonical Drops Ubuntu 14.10 Dedicated Images for Apple Hardware

Filed under
Mac
Ubuntu

Ubuntu 14.10 (Utopic Unicorn) has been available for a couple of weeks and the reception has been positive for the most part, but there is one small piece of interesting information that didn't get revealed. It looks like the Ubuntu devs don't need to build specific images for Apple hardware...

Read more

Ubuntu MATE 14.10 Utopic Unicorn : Lightweight and Configurable

Filed under
Ubuntu

“Ubuntu MATE is a stable, easy-to-use operating system with a configurable desktop environment. Ideal for those who want the most out of their desktops, laptops and netbooks and prefer a traditional desktop metaphor. With modest hardware requirements it is suitable for modern workstations and older hardware alike.” About ubuntu MATE

Read more

Ubuntu Touch RTM Gets Major Update – Video Tour

Filed under
Ubuntu

A new Ubuntu Touch RTM version has been released and the developers have made a number of important fixes, not to mention all the improvements that have been made to the backend.

Read more

Ubuntu is working on a new secure container hypervisor: LXD

Filed under
Ubuntu

At the OpenStack Summit, Mark Shuttleworth, founder of Canonical and Ubuntu Linux, announced that Canonial and Docker have started working on a new secure hypervisor, LXD — pronounced lex-d — for containers.

Read more

Taking Ubuntu 14.10 for a ride

Filed under
Reviews
Ubuntu

Ubuntu is one of the more widely used GNU/Linux distributions in the world with the project's parent company, Canonical, reporting around 30 million computers shipping with Ubuntu pre-installed in the past two years. Ubuntu, along with its many community editions, continues to be used by millions around the world and the decisions made by Ubuntu developers have an direct impact on many computer users.

Read more

Syndicate content

More in Tux Machines

today's leftovers

FOSS in the European Union

  • Competition authorities first to implement DMS services
    The DRS are published as open source software using the European Union’s open source software licence EUPL, and are available on Joinup. The software provides connectors for most commonly-used document management systems, and includes scripts to create a database to implement the connecting web services.
  • Czech Republic is at the forefront of an open data international project
    With the beginning of the new year, an international project “Open crowdsourcing data related to the quality of service of high-speed Internet” was launched, which aims to encourage the development of open data in the user’s measurement of high-speed Internet.

Arch Linux News

  • Linux Top 3: Arch Anywhere, Bitkey and Vinux
    Arch Linux is a powerful rolling Linux distribution, that hasn't always been particularly easy for new users to install and deploy. The goal of the Arch Anywhere system is to provide new and old users with the ability to install a fully custom Arch Linux system in minutes.
  • Arch Linux Preparing To Deprecate i686 Support
    Arch Linux is moving ahead with preparing to deprecate i686 (x86 32-bit) support in their distribution. Due to declining usage of Arch Linux i686, they will be phasing out official support for the architecture. Next month's ISO spin will be the last for offering a 32-bit Arch Linux install. Following that will be a nine month deprecation period where i686 packages will still see updates.
  • News draft for i686 deprecation
    Finally found some time to write a draft for news post on i686. Here it is: Title: i686 is dead, long live i686 Due to the decreasing popularity of i686 among the developers and the community, we have decided to phase out the support of this architecture. The decision means that February ISO will be the last that allows to install 32 bit Arch Linux. The next 9 months are deprecation period, during which i686 will be still receiving upgraded packages. Starting from November 2017, packaging and repository tools will no longer require that from maintainers, effectively making i686 unsupported. However, as there is still some interest in keeping i686 alive, we would like to encourage the community to make it happen with our guidance. Depending on the demand, an official channel and mailing list will be created for second tier architectures.

LinuxCon Europe on 100G Networking

  • The World of 100G Networking
    Capacity and speed requirements keep increasing for networking, but going from where are now to 100G networking isn’t a trivial matter, as Christopher Lameter and Fernando Garcia discussed recently in their LinuxCon Europe talk about the world of 100G networking. It may not be easy, but with recently developed machine learning algorithms combined with new, more powerful servers, the idea of 100G networking is becoming feasible and cost effective.
  • The World of 100G Networking by Christoph Lameter
    The idea of 100G networking is becoming feasible and cost effective. This talk gives an overview about the competing technologies in terms of technological differences and capabilities and then discusses the challenges of using various kernel interfaces to communicate at these high speeds.