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Ubuntu

Ubuntu: A new "Unity 8" flavour

Filed under
Ubuntu

The desktop team would like to add a new flavour (ish, we don't plan to
have any formal releases at this point) of Ubuntu which contains the
Unity 8 desktop and the new applications which have been developed for
the touch project.

The initial intention is to provide a product which developers can use
to figure out the work that's required to make a desktop product based
on this software usable, and to create a space for experimentation to
figure out the best ways of carrying out the required integration. We
still plan to migrate pieces of the current desktop over, but we are
very mindful of the need to not destabilise the desktop and upset its
users, and are hopeful that developing this flavour in parallel will
mean that migrations will truly happen when software is ready instead of
as a result of pressure to get work into the hands of users early.

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ATOM TEXT EDITOR UBUNTU PPA UPDATE

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Ubuntu

Today I've updated the Atom Ubuntu PPA with the latest Atom code from GitHub and, while the application still doesn't work on 32bit, there is some good news: Atom uses dynamic libraries now, so you might be able to use my builds in Linux distributions other than Ubuntu (Fedora, Debian etc.). The new version also comes with quite a few Linux bug fixes.

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Canonical Juju DevOps tool coming to CentOS and Windows

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Ubuntu

It's hard to shock an audience at a technical conference. Mark Shuttleworth, founder of Ubuntu Linux and its parent company Canonical, managed it several times in his OpenStack Summit keynote speech. No news may have been more surprising than that Canonical had ported its Juju DevOps program to its rival's operating systems: Red Hat's CentOS and Microsoft's Hyber-V and Windows Server 2012.

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Linux Mint 17 release candidate available for download

Filed under
GNU
Linux
Ubuntu

The final version of Linux Mint 17 is due by the end of the month. But you can download the release candidate right now. Linux Mint 17 comes in 32-bit or 64-bit versions, in the Cinnamon or MATE desktop environments.

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CONFIRMED: NEXT 3 LINUX MINT RELEASES WILL BE BASED ON UBUNTU 14.04 LTS

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GNU
Linux
Ubuntu

This means that Linux Mint 17, 17.1, 17.2 and 17.3 (so Linux Mint 18 will be based on Ubuntu 16.04) will all use Ubuntu 14.04 LTS as a base instead of being based on newer Ubuntu releases, allowing the Mint team to "push innovation on Cinnamon, be more active in the development of MATE, better support Mint tools and engage in projects we’ve postponed for years".

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Ubuntu Touch Emulator Is Now Working For x86

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Ubuntu

Ricardo Salveti de Araujo of Canonical shared that over the weekend every needed package was approved and as a result they have published their first working image of the x86 Ubuntu Phone/Touch emulator.

There's ubuntu-emulator and ubuntu-emulator-runtime packages that provide the Touch Emulator but those not running the Ubuntu 14.10 development OS will need to add the Phablet Team's PPA for getting the working support.

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Valve Releases New Steam Update with Another Ubuntu 14.04 LTS Fix

Filed under
Gaming
Ubuntu

Between stable builds, the developers launch a large number of Beta versions that integrate a lot of new features. The previous update for this branch was a really small one, but now a more important version has been released, prompting users to upgrade the application.

Most of the time, the Steam client is pretty stable and users don't usually encounter any problems with it, either about performance or stability. This doesn't mean that the software is perfect, because there still are instances where some features or options might not work as expected.

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Ubuntu Touch Emulator Officially Released

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Ubuntu

An Ubuntu Touch emulator is one of the few things that Canonical was missing, and now, with the help of Ubuntu developer Ricardo Salveti de Araujo, users are able to test the latest images released by the team before deciding whether to install the operating system on the phone itself.

This is just the first iteration of the emulator and it's still in the early stages of production, which means that you will encounter numerous bugs and the interface is not smooth enough, even if it's running on a powerful system.

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Announcing Ubuntu Pioneers

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Ubuntu

Ubuntu has always been about breaking new ground. We broke the ground with the desktop back in 2004, we have broken the ground with cloud orchestration across multiple clouds and providers, and we are building a powerful, innovative mobile and desktop platform that is breaking ground with convergence.

The hardest part about breaking new ground and innovating is not having the vision and creating the technology, it is getting people on board to be part of it.

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Canonical offers "Chuck Norris Grade" OpenStack private cloud service

Filed under
Server
Ubuntu

Canonical is now offering what Shuttleworth called "Chuck Norrris Grade" private clouds. This means that Canonical will offer fully managed, OpenStack private clouds with carrier service service level agreements (SLA)s.

Canonical is adding private cloud hosting to its business model because as Chris Kenyon, Canonical's SVP of Worldwide Sales & Business Development, explained, smaller companies have a great deal of trouble holding on to OpenStack architectures. "It's not uncommon for a company to go through three architects in six months because the demand is so high for OpenStack experts. So to help our customers get up to speed on OpenStack, we decided to offer hosted private cloud services."

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