Language Selection

English French German Italian Portuguese Spanish


GNOME Project Welcomes Canonical and Ubuntu to GNOME Foundation Advisory Board

Filed under

With the release of the Ubuntu 17.10 (Artful Aardvark) operating system, Canonical replaced their Unity user interface with the GNOME desktop environment, and now they're looking to sponsor the project by becoming a member of the Advisory Board.

Among some powerful members of GNOME Foundation's Advisory Board, we can mention Google, FSF (Free Software Foundation), and Linux Foundation. And now, Canonical will also support the GNOME Project by providing funding and expert consultation.

Read more

Also: Ubuntu Linux-maker Canonical joins GNOME Foundation advisory board

Canonical/Ubuntu Leftovers

Filed under
  • Ubuntu Server Development Summary – 31 Oct 2017

    The purpose of this communication is to provide a status update and highlights for any interesting subjects from the Ubuntu Server Team. If you would like to reach the server team, you can find us at the #ubuntu-server channel on Freenode. Alternatively, you can sign up and use the Ubuntu Server Team mailing list.

  • Juju GUI: get your users started with
  • MAAS 2.3.0 beta 3 released!

    I’m happy to announce that MAAS 2.3.0 Beta 3 has now been released and it is currently available in PPA and as a snap.

  • Online course about LXD containers
  • LXD Weekly Status #21: Console Attach, Distribution Work, & More

    Last week @brauner and @stgraber were traveling to Prague for the Open Source Summit Europe.
    We got the opportunity to talk about LXD, system containers and various bits of ongoing kernel work as well as meet with a number of our users and contributors!

    All this travel and conference time reduced our ability to do feature work this week, so we’ve mostly been reviewing contributions and pushing a number of bugfixes with things going back to normal this week.

  • Ubuntu 17.10 quick screenshot tour

    Ubuntu 17.10 is the newest version of this world famous Linux distribution, and this one is especially interesting because Canonical decided to dump its controversial Unity baby and use GNOME desktop environment instead.

Ubuntu Desktops Compared

Filed under

The Ubuntu desktop has evolved a lot over the years. Ubuntu started off with GNOME 2, then moved onto Unity. From there, it came home to its roots with the GNOME 3 desktop. In this article, we'll look at the Ubuntu desktops and compare them.

Read more

Ubuntu 14.04 To Ubuntu 17.10 RadeonSI OpenGL Performance

Filed under

As part of the multi-year comparisons for marking AMD's open-source strategy being 10 years old, here's a look back with fresh OpenGL Linux gaming benchmarks from Ubuntu 14.04 through Ubuntu 17.10 using a Radeon HD 7950 graphics card with the RadeonSI Gallium3D driver. There's also a similar comparison with a Radeon R9 Fury.

Read more

Debian and Derivatives

Filed under
  • Building packages without (fake)root

    Turns out that it is surprisingly easy to build most packages without (fake)root.

  • Elive 3.0 Is One Step Closer to Reality as Latest Beta Introduces Many Goodies

    The developers of the Debian-based Elive GNU/Linux distribution leveraging the Enlightenment desktop environment are still trying to finish the major Elive 3.0 release, and they just published a new Beta.

    Elive 2.9.12 Beta is here almost two months after the previous beta (versioned 2.9.8), and it looks like it's a big one, adding an extra layer of performance improvements to the desktop and window effects with up to 194%, as well as to video playback, which is now smoother than on previous betas.

    Elive's graphical installer, yes the one you don't have to pay to use it anymore, has been refactored in this new beta release to include a validator of characters for usernames, passwords, and hostnames, make the entire installation process a lot easier than before, and also fix numerous bugs, especially for the built-in browser.

  • And We’re Off: Development Begins on Ubuntu 18.04 LTS ‘Bionic Beaver’

    Canonical’s Matthias Klose shared the news on the Ubuntu development mailing list.

    The first few weeks of every Ubuntu development cycle is spent syncing key packages from upstream sources, plumbing in the base infrastructure on which future changes lay, and so on.

  • Ubuntu 18.04 LTS Release Schedule

    For those of you unaware Ubuntu’s April (xx.04) releases follow a 27-week schedule (as opposed to October releases’ 25 week schedule, owing to the little matter of Xmas and New Year).

    During the cycle time 2 alpha milestones, 2 beta milestones and 1 release candidate build are issued for public testing. Ubuntu flavors often take advantage of all of these.

  • Help test Plasma 5.8.8 LTS and Krita 3.3.1 for Kubuntu Backports!

Debian and Ubuntu Leftovers

Filed under
  • How Can Debian Turn Disagreement into Something that Makes us Stronger

    Recently, when asked to engage with the Debian Technical Committee, a maintainer chose to orphan their package rather than discuss the issue brought before the committee. In another decision earlier this year, a maintainer orphaned their package indicating a lack of respect for the approach being taken and the process. Unfortunately, this joins an ever longer set of issues where people walk away from the TC process disheartened and upset.

    For me personally the situations where maintainers walked away from the process were hard. People I respect and admire were telling me that they were unwilling to participate in our dispute resolution process. In one case the maintainer explicitly did not respect a process I had been heavily involved in. As someone who values understanding and build a team, I feel disappointed and hurt thinking about this.

  • Full Circle Magazine #126
  • Ubuntu Desktop Weekly Update: GNOME Fixes & New Snaps

    I’ll be starting the weekly round-up posts again now that the release is out and 18.04 is getting under way. At this early stage in the development cycle we’re spending a week or so tidying up the loose ends from 17.10, SRUing the important fixes that we’ve found, getting ready to sync new packages from Debian, and generally doing the groundwork to give us a clear run at 18.04. As you know, 18.04 will be an LTS release and so we will be focusing on stability and reliability this cycle, as well as a few new features. I’ll give a more detailed view into 18.04 in the coming weeks.

Canonical to Focus Mostly on Stability and Reliability for Ubuntu 18.04 LTS

Filed under

Ubuntu Desktop Director Will Cooke shares some information about what Canonical's plans are for the next LTS (Long Term Support) release of Ubuntu, which is scheduled for release on April 26, 2018. As expected, they'll focus mostly on stability and reliability, but it looks like there will be some new features added as well during the development cycle of Ubuntu 18.04 LTS.

"At this early stage in the development cycle we’re spending a week or so tidying up the loose ends from 17.10, SRUing the important fixes that we’ve found, getting ready to sync new packages from Debian," said Will Cooke in his latest weekly report. "As you know, 18.04 will be an LTS release and so we will be focusing on stability and reliability this cycle, as well as a few new features."

Read more

Ubuntu: 17.10 Review, Ubuntu 18.04 Plans, and Mir/Wayland

Filed under
  • GNU/Linux Review: Ubuntu 17.10 "Artful Aardvark"

    This is a review for Ubuntu 17.10 "Artful Aardvark" that was released at 19 October 2017 which features the new GNOME Desktop, new user interface, with GNOME 3.26 applications, and new wallpapers. The freshly installed system runs at ±1GiB of RAM and is slower on old machine. This review contains links for more information such as Artful download links, installation guide, and also newbie's guide. I hope you find this review helpful!

  • Ubuntu 18.04 LTS Bionic Beaver — Release Date And Expected Features

    Following the release of Ubuntu 17.10 Artful Aardvark, Canonical CEO Mark Shuttleworth announced that Ubuntu 18.04, which would be an LTS release, is going to be called “Bionic Beaver.” While Beaver refers to a large, amphibious rodent with smooth fur and sharp teeth, Bionic is an ode to the robotics and artificial body parts.

  • Ubuntu 18.04 LTS (Bionic Beaver) Is Now Officially Open for Development

    In a mailing list announcement published on Friday, Canonical's Matthias Klose announced that the Ubuntu 18.04 LTS (Bionic Beaver) operating system is now officially open for development.

    Ubuntu 18.04 LTS is the next long-term supported release of Ubuntu, which Canonical CEO Mark Shuttleworth dubbed as the "Bionic Beaver." According to the release schedule, the toolchain was uploaded on October 26, 2017, and development kicks off today, October 27, with APT, DPKG, and Debhelper merges.

  • Bionic Beaver now open for development
  • Longtime friends

    You may not know him, but he’s amongst other things the creator of something that could be seen as a precursor to a GNOME OS. Foresight was a distribution based on conary and aimed at providing an easy to use desktop with the latest technologies. It had rolling releases and always shipped the newest upstream bits, without any downstream patches whatsoever. It was also the first distribution to use PackageKit as the official user facing application installation interface. Back then, we used it as the base for an official live image of GNOME available on the GNOME website which was actually just Foresight without the wallpaper or any mention of the distribution.

  • Mir To Next Focus On Improving Wayland Testing

    With Mir now having basic Wayland support, next on their agenda is to improve the acceptance/conformance tests around Wayland in general that will help in vetting Mir's Wayland support code.

Reviews of Ubuntu MATE 17.10

Filed under
  • What’s New in Ubuntu MATE 17.10

    Ubuntu MATE 17.10 the official flavor of Ubuntu 17.10 with MATE desktop has been released and announced by the Ubuntu MATE Developer. This release ships with the latest MATE Desktop 1.18 as default desktop environment include the MATE apps 1.18 and powered the latest Linux kernel 4.13 series.

    The most important features that added in Ubuntu MATE 17.10, support for global menus and the Heads-Up Display (HUD) feature that was available in the mutiny, cupertino and Contemporary layouts user interface. The login screen has been changed to Slick Greeter, powered by LightDM, and you can now use the Super key to active menu launchers.

  • Ubuntu Mate 17.10 Review

    Looking for a Linux distribution that is both easy to use and extremely customizable? Look no further than Ubuntu Mate! Ubuntu Mate has proven to be a very popular distribution ever since its release. The latest release, 17.10, should prove just as popular, as there are a whole host of improvements.

Ubuntu-Based CAINE 9.0 "Quantum" GNU/Linux Operating System Lands with New Tools

Filed under

The developers of the Ubuntu-based CAINE (Computer Aided INvestigative Environment) GNU/Linux distribution announced the availability of a new major release, CAINE 9.0 "Quantum."

Coming almost a year after the CAINE 8.0 "Blazar" release, CAINE 9.0 "Quantum" introduces numerous new programs, scripts, and tools, among which we can mention VolDiff, The Harvester, NBTempoX, SafeCopy, RegRipper, PFF tools, pListUtil, Mouseemu, Tinfoleak, regfmount, Infoga, OSINT, WinAudit, and MWSnap.

Read more

Syndicate content

More in Tux Machines

lkml: remove eight obsolete architectures

In the end, it seems that while the eight architectures are extremely different, they all suffered the same fate: There was one company in charge of an SoC line, a CPU microarchitecture and a software ecosystem, which was more costly than licensing newer off-the-shelf CPU cores from a third party (typically ARM, MIPS, or RISC-V). It seems that all the SoC product lines are still around, but have not used the custom CPU architectures for several years at this point. Read more

If you hitch a ride with a scorpion… (Coverity)

I haven’t seen a blog post or notice about this, but according to the Twitters, Coverity has stopped supporting online scanning for open source projects. Is anybody shocked by this? Anybody? [...] Not sure what the story is with Coverity, but it probably has something to do with 1) they haven’t been able to monetize the service the way they hoped, or 2) they’ve been able to monetize the service and don’t fancy spending the money anymore or 3) they’ve pivoted entirely and just aren’t doing the scanning thing. Not sure which, don’t really care — the end result is the same. Open source projects that have come to depend on this now have to scramble to replace the service. [...] I’m not going to go all RMS, but the only way to prevent this is to have open tools and services. And pay for them. Read more

Easily Fund Open Source Projects With These Platforms

Financial support is one of the many ways to help Linux and Open Source community. This is why you see “Donate” option on the websites of most open source projects. While the big corporations have the necessary funding and resources, most open source projects are developed by individuals in their spare time. However, it does require one’s efforts, time and probably includes some overhead costs too. Monetary supports surely help drive the project development. If you would like to support open source projects financially, let me show you some platforms dedicated to open source and/or Linux. Read more

KDE: Kdenlive, Kubuntu, Elisa, KDE Connect

  • Kdenlive Café #27 and #28 – You can’t miss it
    Timeline refactoring, new Pro features, packages for fast and easy install, Windows version and a bunch of other activities are happening in the Kdenlive world NOW!
  • Kubuntu 17.10 Guide for Newbie Part 9
    This is the 9th article, the final part of the series. This ninth article gives you more documentations to help yourself in using Kubuntu 17.10. The resources are online links to certain manuals and ebooks specialized for Kubuntu basics, command lines usage, software installation instructions, how to operate LibreOffice and KDE Plasma.
  • KDE's Elisa Music Player Preparing For Its v0.1 Released
    We have been tracking the development of Elisa, one of several KDE music players, since development started about one year ago. Following the recent alpha releases, the KDE Elisa 0.1 stable release is on the way. Elisa developers are preparing the Elisa v0.1 release and they plan to have it out around the middle of April.
  • KDE Connect Keeps Getting Better For Interacting With Your Desktop From Android
    KDE Connect is the exciting project that allows you to leverage your KDE desktop from Android tablets/smartphones for features like sending/receiving SMS messages from your desktop, toggling music, sharing files, and much more. KDE Connect does continue getting even better.
  • First blog & KDE Connect media control improvements
    I've started working on KDE Connect last November. My first big features were released yesterday in KDE Connect 1.8 for Android, so cause for celebration and a blog post! My first big feature is media notifications. KDE Connect has, since it's inception, allowed you to remotely control your music and video's. Now you can also do this with a notification, like all Android music apps do! So next time a bad song comes up, you don't need to switch to the KDE Connect app. Just click next on the notification without closing you current app. And just in case you don't like notifications popping up, there's an option to disable it.