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Ubuntu

Ubuntu Leftovers (Mostly Release-Related)

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Ubuntu

Lubuntu 16.10 Lands as a Bugfix Release That Prepares the Distro for LXQt

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Ubuntu

Lubuntu 16.10 is the last official flavor announced as part of yesterday's Ubuntu 16.10 (Yakkety Yak) final release, and we'd love to tell you a little bit about what's new and what's coming next for the distribution.

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Ubuntu Studio 16.10 Released with Ardour 5.0, Blender 2.77a, and LMMS 1.1.3

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Ubuntu

As part of today's Ubuntu 16.10 (Yakkety Yak) release, Canonical also unveiled the new version of the Ubuntu Studio operating system, an official flavor targeted at general multimedia production.

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Ubuntu Kylin 16.10 Arrives for Chinese-Speaking Users, Here's What's New

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Ubuntu

Today, October 13, 2016, was an important day for Ubuntu users, as Canonical launched the release of Ubuntu 16.10 (Yakkety Yak), along with most of its officially recognized derivatives.

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More on *buntu 16.10

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Ubuntu

Ubuntu 16.10 Provides Incremental Linux Desktop Improvements

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Ubuntu

Canonical, the lead commercial sponsor behind the open-source Ubuntu Linux operating system, is set to debut its second major milestone release of 2016 on Oct. 13. The Ubuntu 16.10 release is named Yakkety Yak and follows the 16.04 Xenial Xerus release, which became generally available on April 21 and is a Long Term Support (LTS) release. The 16.10 release, however, is what Canonical considers to be a standard release. With an LTS, Canonical provides support for five years, while a standard release is supported only for nine months. In many respects, Ubuntu 16.10 is an incremental release and does not provide major new features, but rather a set of updated packages and minor improvements. Among the updated software are the open-source LibreOffice 5.2 productivity suite and the Firefox 48 web browser. Also of particular note is the fact that Ubuntu 16.10 is based on the latest Linux 4.8 kernel, which provides advanced hardware support and improved performance. The Ubuntu 16.10 milestone also provides a preview for the Unity 8 desktop. In this slide show, eWEEK takes a look at some of the features in the Ubuntu 16.04 Linux release.

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Based on Ubuntu 16.04 LTS, the Release Candidate of Black Lab Linux 8.0 Is Here

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Linux
Ubuntu

After informing us earlier today, October 12, 2016, about the fact that the Black Lab Linux project has become a commercial product, Black Lab Software CEO Robert Dohnert announced the release of Black Lab Linux 8.0 RC1.

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Clear Linux Continues To Maintain Slight Graphics Lead Over Ubuntu 16.10

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Graphics/Benchmarks
Ubuntu

Back in April I did tests showing how Intel's Clear Linux distribution showed much potential for HD/Iris Graphics performance, something that intrigued many Phoronix readers since Clear Linux would generally be seen as a workstation/cloud/container-optimized Linux distribution and something with not much emphasis on the desktop or gaming. Those earlier tests were with Ubuntu 16.04, bur with Ubuntu 16.10 coming out this week, here are some fresh tests of Clear Linux and Ubuntu Yakkety Yak on an Skylake HD Graphics system.

For curiosity sake, I ran some fresh Ubuntu 16.10 vs. Clear Linux (10820) benchmarks on the same Core i5 6600K system with an MSI Z170A GAMING PRO motherboard, 16GB DDR4-2133MHz memory, and 256GB TS256GSSD370S SSD. The mid-range i5-6600K is equipped with HD Graphics 530.

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Ubuntu 16.04, re-tested six months later

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Reviews
Ubuntu

Six months in between releases is just too short of a period for meaningful, well-tested releases. As soon as issues are polished in one edition with a cumulative fix edition, there's a new version of Ubuntu and the headless chicken race starts again. We will soon have 16.10, and it will most likely suck, because there will be a million little problems that could not have been fully checked in time, but schedule be schedule, release we must. Woe any delays!

Ubuntu 16.04.1 Xenial Xerus is a better release than the GA flop, but it is still not good enough to recommend. The networking stack sucks more than what Trusty does, and overall, it is slower, less responsive, less mature, less complete. It is also not as good as Fedora, and there are some big regressions slash sad neglect in the software stack that tells me the whole idea of the Linux desktop is slowly dying. People did not like the Amazon store and the payware options in USC, but it was a first sane step to offering a mature version of Ubuntu to serious people. Alas, zealots shot it down, because they value pride over progress. And now what is left is a semi-functional distro that is a pale shadow of its former self.

So yes, it works better than before. 6/10 or so. Not even remotely close to the glory of the Trusty release, which heaped accolade upon accolade, accomplishment after another. Trusty just did everything. It was and still is awesome. Xerus is just weak. And even the post-fiasco release is still somewhat lame. Not worth upgrading. Xenial is in denial. I shall now patiently wait to see what doom the Yakety Sax is going to bring us. Ought to happen very very soon, and the timing of this article couldn't have been any more perfect. Stay tuned.

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GNOME News

  • Do you like Windows 10 Look but Love LINUX? Here are Windows 10 GTK Themes for you!
  • A history about Gtk+, Vulkan and Wayland
    A few weeks ago, I was curious to test Gtk+ 4. I know it has some awsome features like OpenGL rendering, major cleanups and other hot stuff, but didn’t have the chance to check it out until then. I was mostly excited about Vulkan. I know both of my laptop’s graphic cards support Vulkan. It’s a hybrid Intel Broadwell G2 + NVidia GeForce 920M, although I don’t use the latter because Linux sucks hard with Dual GPU. Downloaded the latest Gtk+ source, compiled and… nothing. Immediate segmentation fault. Yay! What a great chance to get involved with the next major Gtk+ version development!
  • GNOME Developer On GTK4: State-of-the-Art of Toolkit Support
    GNOME developer Georges Stavracas has shared his thoughts on the state of the GTK4 tool-kit with the recent work involving a Vulkan renderer, including which also now works on Wayland. Georges Stavracas was excited to try the current state of GTK4 development but initially hit a segmentation fault. But after overcoming that, he was successful in running GTK4 on Wayland and the widgets being rendered by Vulkan. He commented on his blog, "May not be as exciting, since there are no new visible features but… damn, it’s Gtk+ being rendered with Vulkan on Wayland. It’s basically the state-of-the-art of toolkit support right now. Even better, the absolute majority of applications will gain this for free once they port to Gtk+ 4 series."

Red Hat and Fedora

Leftovers: Ubuntu

Android Leftovers