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Ubuntu

KDE's Leaner Experience On openSUSE Tumbleweed vs. Ubuntu 17.04

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KDE
SUSE
Ubuntu

With the Power Use, RAM + Boot Times With Unity, Xfce, GNOME, LXDE, Budgie and KDE Plasma tests this week, many expressed frustration over the heavy KDE packaging on Ubuntu leading to the inflated results for the Plasma 5 desktop tests. For some additional reference, here is how KDE Plasma (and GNOME Shell) compare when running on Ubuntu 17.04 vs. openSUSE Tumbleweed.

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Ubuntu MATE 17.10 Beta 1 Released

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Ubuntu

The first Ubuntu 17.10 beta releases are now available to download. Among the various Ubuntu flavours taking part in this round of testing are Ubuntu MATE, Xubuntu and Ubuntu Budgie, whose changes we highlight below.

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Development of Ubuntu and Bodhi Linux 4.3.1 (Buxfix Release)

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Ubuntu
  • Ubuntu Foundations Development Summary – August 30, 2017

    This newsletter is here to provide a status update from the Ubuntu Foundations Team. There will also be highlights provided for any interesting subjects the team may be working on. If you would like to reach the Foundations team, you can find us at the #ubuntu-devel channel on freenode.

  • Security Team Weekly Summary: August 31, 2017
  • Kernel Team Summary: August 30, 2017

    We intend to target a 4.13 kernel for the Ubuntu 17.10 release. The Artful kernel is currently based on Linux 4.12.9. The Artful staging kernel repository has been updated to 4.13-rc7. As a reminder, the Ubuntu 17.10 Kernel Freeze is Thurs Oct 5, 2017.

  • Ubuntu 17.10 Will Ship with GNOME Shell 3.26

    Most of us expected that Ubuntu 17.10 would manage to with GNOME Shell 3.26 on board — but it’s nice to hear it confirmed.

    A feature-freeze exception filed pending a package update last week has been approved, and now the first packages of GNOME Shell 3.26 are filtering out through the artful-proposed repository, ready for testing by users of the Ubuntu 17.10 daily builds.

  • Bodhi Linux 4.3.1 Unscheduled Update Released

    It seems like just yesterday that I was posting about Bodhi 4.3.0… Oh wait, it was just yesterday. In a friendly reminder that I am still human – we had a pretty major issue with one of the Bodhi 4.3.0 discs. Most issues we can simply patch via the package manager after the fact without releasing a new set of ISO images, but this issue was fairly unique. The new system was failing to add the official Bodhi repository to the installed system. Because of this I’ve published a set of discs with the 4.3.1 version number.

Ubuntu is adding a dock. Here's why that's important

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Ubuntu

I know, it really doesn't sound like a headline that should be taking up too much space or time. Ubuntu is adding a dock to GNOME. Big deal. It is, after all, nothing more than an extension that anyone can add from the GNOME Extension site.

Or is it?

I am actually one that believes this to be a very important move for Ubuntu. No matter how inconsequential it may be, to the world at large, this is all about one thing for Canonical.

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Ubuntu Leftovers

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Ubuntu

Tiny, rugged, open-spec SBC plugs into carrier or breadboards

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Linux
Ubuntu

FriendlyElec’s WiFi-ready, $8 “NanoPi Duo” runs Linux on a quad -A7 Allwinner H2+, and can plug into a $10 RPi-like carrier or any standard breadboard.

FriendlyElec has added to its line of open spec, community backed NanoPi SBCs with an IoT-focused, $8 NanoPi Duo SBC that can plug into a $10 “Mini Shield” carrier board or any standard breadboard. The NanoPi Duo measures just 50 x 25.4 (1,270 sq. mm) making it one of the smallest Linux-ready SBCs around, even smaller than the 40 x 40mm (1,600 sq. mm) NanoPi Neo line of boards, such as the latest NanoPi Neo Plus2.

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Debian and Ubuntu; BBQ Cambridge, Artful Aardvark Feature Freeze

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Ubuntu
  • BBQ Cambridge 2017 - post 2

    We were all up until about 0100 Smile House full of folk talking about all sorts, a game of Mao. Garden full of people clustered round the barbeque or sitting chatting - I had a long chat about Debian, what it means and how it's often an easier world to deal with and move in than the world of work, office politics or whatever - being here is being at home.

  • BBQ Cambridge 2017 - post 3
  • OMGWTFBBQ Cambridge 2017

    Funny this - I only blog when I'm in Cambridge Smile I'm sure there's a blog back in the day from a BBQ a good few years ago. This is almost deja vu - a room full of Debian types - the crazy family - Thinkpads on a lot of laps and lots of chat around the room.

  • Let's send patches to debian-policy (rst file is your friend Smile

    As I posted before, now debian-policy package uses Sphinx. It means, you can edit and send patches for Debian Policy easier than ever. Get source (install devscripts package and exec 'debcheck debian-policy')  and dig into policy directory. There are several rst files for each chapter.

  • Artful Aardvark (to be 17.10) feature freeze

    While this email comes a bit late, if you've been watching your calendars, you know that Artful has been in Feature Freeze since yesterday.

    Ideally you will all now be focusing on bug fixing and not on getting new features into the release.

    As is the custom, packages that have been uploaded to artful-proposed prior to the feature freeze deadline, but have gotten stuck there, remain candidates for fixing between now and release.

  • Ubuntu 17.10 Enters The Feature Freeze

    Ubuntu 17.10, the Artful Aardvark, has crossed into the feature freeze this week.

    Ubuntu developers are now to be focused on fixing bugs rather than on introducing new features for 17.10, which will be officially released at the middle of October.

    There still though is the possibility of feature freeze exceptions to be granted as well as those packages currently residing in artful-proposed are still able to land. Confirmation of the Artful feature freeze was posted today to the mailing list.

System76's Pop!_OS Weekly Update

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GNU
Linux
Ubuntu
  • Pop!_OS Weekly Update: 17.10, Distro Settings, and Default Apps

    At System76 we all work in the same office so keeping the external Pop!_OS community involved and up-to-date is an interesting challenge. So far we’ve been communicating our ideas and work through our chat channel and blog. This week we decided to hold our first System76+Community meeting in Pop!_Chat to discuss default settings and apps. While the overall outcome was fantastic, there are definitely ways we can increase bandwidth between those at System76 HQ and community members around the world. We’re working on some ideas.

  • System76's Pop!_OS Not Using Wayland By Default, Figuring Out Default Apps

    -
    System76 continues working on their Ubuntu fork called Pop!_OS that they intend to ship on their future laptops and desktops. They have now decided on some of the default applications as well as the decision to not yet ship Wayland by default.

    System76 has been migrating the Pop!_OS base from Ubuntu 17.04 to 17.10 and made improvements around that to reduce the ISO size and memory usage. They have also decided for their initial release they will continue using the X.Org Server while the Wayland session will just be optional. They aren't yet moving to Wayland due to concerns around unsupported applications and confusion to users when applications are running into problems because of Wayland.

Debian and Ubuntu: Debate About Proprietary Services, Ubuntu Looks and More

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Debian
Ubuntu
  • Debian debates software for proprietary services

    Distributions like Debian have a clear policy on the software they ship; as a general rule, only free software can be considered for inclusion. How that policy should be applied to software that interacts with proprietary systems is not entirely clear, though. A recent discussion on a package that interfaces with a proprietary network service seems unlikely to lead to any changes in policy, but it does highlight a fault line within the Debian community.

    Back in February, Jonas Smedegaard filed a bug against the "certspotter" package, complaining that the package's description advertises the proprietary SSLMate service. On August 4, the maintainer of that package, Faidon Liambotis, got around to answering the bug, saying that the description is helpful for users searching for the package and will not be removed. At that point, Smedegaard took the discussion to the debian-project mailing list in an attempt to rally the Debian developer community against the offending package description.

  • Install Numix Theme And Icons in Ubuntu/Linux Mint
  • Violet Comeback theme Gives A Nice Dark Look To Ubuntu

    Violet-comeback theme is the GTK2/GTK3 counterpart to the Qt5/KDE color scheme "Violet Comeback". It was mainly designed to make GTK applications match with KDE Violet color scheme, but it is also compatible with Gnome, Unity, Xfce, Cinnamon, Mate and so on. As creator mentioned this theme is based on Numix and generated with oomox. Since this theme is in active development some issues exist in the GTK3 version: there are no borders at all on some windows and no shadow, which make the look a bit too flat. The windows cannot be handled properly. If you find any other bug in the theme then report it and hopefully it will get fixed.

  • Exploring snappy package manager. Why it is awesome and how to get started.
  • Ubuntu 16.04.3 Point Release, A Short Review & Upgrade Howto

    Ubuntu Xenial Point Release 3, or 16.04.3, has been released at 03 August 2017. Here's some review, download links, and how to upgrade from 16.04 or 14.04.

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Ubuntu 17.10 Continues Refining Its GNOME Shell Theme

Filed under
GNOME
Ubuntu

Will Cooke of Canonical is out with another weekly update on the latest happenings for the Ubuntu 17.10 desktop as the "Artful Aardvark" release continues getting closer.

There's been continued work on captive portal detection for Ubuntu 17.10, QPDF/CUPS package upgrades, and a lot of theming work happening this past week for the next Ubuntu release, which has transitioned from the Unity 7 desktop to GNOME Shell. And yes, Wayland still plans to be the default.

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More in Tux Machines

Games: Slaps and Beans and Games Online For Android

  • Slaps and Beans now in Early Access
    Bud Spencer & Terence Hill: Slaps and Beans [Steam] is now in Early Access after a successful Kickstarter campaign in which the developers gained over $200k.
  • Best First Person Shooter Games Online For Android
    With the ever shining genre of First Person Shooters making it Huge in the PC market, game studios have brought the best of FPS action to people’s mobile devices. Here I present to you my best picks for the Free first person shooter games online for Android.

Software and howtos

New: NuTyX 9.93 and Linux Mint 18.3

  • NuTyX 9.93 available with cards 2.3.105
    The NuTyX team is please to annonce the 9.93 release of NuTyX. NuTyX 9.92 comes with kernel LTS 4.14.6, glibc 2.26, gcc 7.2.0, binutils 2.29.1, python 3.6.0, xorg-server 1.19.5, qt 5.10.0, KDE plasma 5.11.3, KDE Framework 5.41.0, KDE Applications 17.12.0, mate 1.18.2, xfce4 4.12.4, firefox 57.0.2 Quantum, etc...
  • Linux Mint 18.3 'Sylvia' Xfce and KDE editions are available for download
    Linux Mint is killing the KDE version of its operaring system -- a move some people applaud. That's what makes the new 18.3 version -- named "Sylvia" -- so frustrating. It's bizarre to release a new version of an operating system that essentially has no future. But oh well, here we are. After a short beta period, the KDE distro is now available for download -- if you still care. I recommend that KDE loyalists just switch to Kubuntu or Netrunner, but I digress. Despite being the final version of Linux Mint KDE, it is still a great alternative to the consistently disappointing Windows 10. After all, it has been discovered that Microsoft is bundling a bug-ridden password-manager with its operating system without user consent! How can you trust such an OS?! Sigh.
  • Linux Mint 18.3 "Sylvia" KDE and Xfce Editions Officially Released, Download Now
    The Linux Mint team released the final Linux Mint 18.3 "Sylvia" Xfce and Linux Mint 18.3 "Sylvia" KDE editions to download, as well as an upgrade for existing Linux Mint 18.2 "Sonya" users. Previously in beta, the Linux Mint 18.3 "Sylvia" KDE and Xfce editions are now officially released and ready for production use. Just like the Cinnamon and MATE flavors, they are based on Canonical's long-term supported Ubuntu 16.04 LTS (Xenial Xerus) operating system and use the Linux 4.10 kernel by default for new installations.

GNU: Glibc, GIMP, GCC

  • Glibc 2.27 Lands Yet More Performance Optimizations
    Earlier this month I wrote how Intel engineers have been busy with continuing to tune glibc's performance with FMA and AVX optimizations. That work has continued but also other architectures continue tuning their GNU C Library performance ahead of the expected v2.27 update. There has been a ton of optimization work this cycle, particularly on the Intel/x86_64 front. For those with newer Intel 64-bit processors, this next glibc release is shaping up to be a speedy update.
  • GIMP PIcks Up Support For The New Flatpak/FreeDesktop.org Screenshot API
    Hot off the release of the new GIMP 2.9.8 and ahead of the expected GIMP 2.10 release candidates that are expected to begin, a new addition to GIMP is a plug-in supporting the new FreeDesktop.org/Flatpak screenshot API. The org.freedesktop.portal.Screenshot specification aims to be a screenshot API that will work not only cross-desktop (e.g. KDE, GNOME, etc) but also work for sandboxed applications (i.e. Flatpak) and also work regardless of whether you are using Wayland or X11.
  • GCC Prepares For Fortran 2018 Support
    The Fortran committee decided last month to rename the upcoming Fortran 2015 programming language update to Fortran 2018. GCC support is being prepped. With this updated programming language technical specification not expected to be published until mid-2018, the committee behind this long-standing programming language decided to rename Fortran 2015 to Fortran 2018. Fortran 2018 should further improve interoperability with C code, improve its parallel programming capabilities, support hexadecimal inputs/outputs, and other improvements over Fortran 2008.