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Ubuntu

Canonical Also Patches Ubuntu 12.04 LTS Against the Stack Clash Vulnerability

Filed under
Security
Ubuntu

Canonical today announced that it released a new kernel security update for the Ubuntu 12.04 LTS (Precise Pangolin) operating system series to patch the infamous Stack Clash vulnerability discovered recently by Qualys Research Labs.

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Debian and Ubuntu Leftovers

Filed under
Debian
Ubuntu
  • Why I will not write a full-feature review of Debian 9

    Its codename is Stretch, which is yet another character from the Toy Story animated film.

    It is available for download in both Install and Live versions, and Live version is available in many flavours: GNOME, KDE, Xfce, Cinnamon, LXDE and so on.

    I hope you will read the review of Debian 9 somewhere else, but I will not feature it on my blog.

  • Debian 9 "Stretch" Download Links & Release Info
  • Ubuntu 17.10 Is Finally Unifying and Cleaning Up the Networking Configuration

    Last year in August, Canonical's Martin Pitt, the systemd maintainer for the Ubuntu Linux operating system at that time, announced the company's plans to unify and clean up the networking configuration in Ubuntu Linux.

    They introduced netplan, a project that promised to centralize the network configuration for all Ubuntu Linux operating system versions, including Desktop, Server, Cloud, and Core (Snappy) under a single file (e.g. /etc/netplan/*.yaml) instead of using /etc/network/interfaces files.

  • Former Ubuntu Phone Insider Shares His Thoughts on Why the Project Failed

    Former Ubuntu Phone developer, Simon Raffeiner, which many of you know as sturmflut, has written a detailed article on his blog to share his thoughts on why he thinks the Ubuntu Phone and Ubuntu Touch projects failed.

    Simon Raffeiner worked on the Ubuntu Touch operating system since its official announcement back in 2013, believing in the project's goals and objectives. He worked for about three years, up until mid-2016, on various Ubuntu Phone-related things, including but not limited to Click apps, bug reports, and tutorials for others to start hacking on Ubuntu Touch.

Ubuntu: Accelerated Video Playback, Netplan By Default, Linux 4.13

Filed under
Linux
Ubuntu
  • Ubuntu Is Finally Looking At Shipping Accelerated Video Playback Support

    It's 2017 and Ubuntu is finally looking at shipping GPU-accelerated video playback support out-of-the-box on the Ubuntu desktop.

    Various forms of video acceleration have been available if installing them from the archive on Ubuntu, but nothing has been available by default... But it's looking like that may change, though their direction is a bit peculiar.

  • Netplan by default in 17.10

    Friday, I uploaded an updated nplan package (version 0.24) to change its Priority: field to important, as well as an update of ubuntu-meta (following a seeds update), to replace ifupdown with nplan in the minimal seed.

  • Ubuntu 17.10 To Fully Use Netplan By Default For Network Configuration

    One year after Ubuntu developers announced their Netplan project for consolidated networking configuration across platforms, they are now planning to use Netplan by default in Ubuntu 17.10 across all editions.

    Netplan has picked up many features in the year it's been under development as a replacement to ifupdown. Netplan aims to handle all network configuration use-cases and can in turn generate configuration files for use by NetworkManager and systemd-networkd.

  • Ubuntu 17.10 Continues Aiming For The Linux 4.13 Kernel

    Mentioned in the weekly Ubuntu Kernel Newsletter are the developers reiterating their plans to ship Ubuntu 17.10 "Artful Aardvark" with the Linux 4.13 kernel.

    They've previously expressed plans for shipping Ubuntu 17.10 Artful with Linux 4.13 and this week's newsletter repeats those claims.

Latest quad-core Banana Pi offers SATA support for $32

Filed under
Android
Linux
Debian
Ubuntu

SinoVoiP’s open-spec, Linux- and Android-ready “Banana Pi BPI-M2 Berry” SBC has a Raspberry Pi-like layout, WiFi, BT, GbE, HDMI, 4x USB, CSI, and SATA.

SinoVoip’s Banana Pi project has introduced a variation on its $40 Banana Pi M2 Ultra hacker SBC with a smaller, Raspberry Pi like, 85 x 56mm footprint instead of the Ultra’s 92 x 60mm. The quad-core Banana Pi BPI-M2 Berry offers fairly similar features as the Ultra, which is also somewhat like to that of the older, 92 x 60mm Banana Pi M2. The main difference compared to the M2 is that the Berry and the Ultra models add SATA support, and not just the under-powered USB variety.

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My Ubuntu for mobile devices post mortem analysis

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Ubuntu

Now that Ubuntu phones and tablets are gone, I would like to offer my thoughts on why I personally think the project failed and what one may learn from it.

To recapitulate my involvement in the project: I had been using Ubuntu Touch on a Nexus 7 on an on-and-off-basis between its announcement in 2013 and December 2014, started working on Click apps in December 2014, started writing the 15-part “Hacking Ubuntu Touch” blog post series about system internals in January 2015, became an Ubuntu Phone Insider, got a Meizu MX4 from Canonical, organized and sponsored the UbuContest app development contest, worked on bug reports and apps until about April 2016, and then sold off/converted all my remaining devices in mid-2016. So I think I can offer some thoughts about the project, its challenges and where we could have done better.

Please note that this post does not apply to the UBPorts project, which continues to work on the phone operating system, Unity 8 and other components.

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Canonical Outs Major Security Updates for All Supported Ubuntu Linux Releases

Filed under
Security
Ubuntu

Canonical released major kernel security updates for all supported Ubuntu Linux operating systems patching up to eleven vulnerabilities across all of the supported architectures.

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Canonical, Ubuntu, Unity, KeePassXC Snap, and MAAS

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Ubuntu
  • Canonical Wants to Add Hardware Accelerated Video Playback by Default to Ubuntu

    In his latest report, Canonical's Will Cooke reports on the efforts the Ubuntu Desktop team is making to enable hardware-accelerated video playback for the upcoming Ubuntu 17.10 (Artful Aardvark) by default.

    According to Will Cooke, the team's goal right now is to lay the groundwork for a solution that would enable hardware-accelerated playback of video files by default, with a focus on making it work on Intel graphics cards. Suppor for Nvidia and AMD Radeon GPUs should come at a later time thanks to Canonical's new testing infrastructure.

  • More Unity Desktop Features Coming to Dash to Dock

    More features familiar to users of the Ubuntu Unity desktop could be making their way to Dash to Dock, a popular desktop dock GNOME extension.

  • Distributing KeePassXC as a snap

    KeePassXC, for KeePass Cross-Platform Community Edition, is an extension of the KeePassX password manager project that incorporates major feature requests and bug fixes. We are an active open source project that is available on all Linux distributions, Windows XP to 10, and Macintosh OSX. Our main goal is to incorporate the features that the community wants while balancing portability, speed, and ease of use. Some of the major features that we have already shipped are browser integration, YubiKey authentication, and a redesigned interface.

  • MAAS Development Summary – June 12th – 16th

    The purpose of this update is to keep our community engaged and informed about the work the team is doing. We’ll cover important announcements, work-in-progress for the next release of MAAS and bugs fixes in release MAAS versions.

Leftovers: Debian, Ubuntu and Derivatives

Filed under
Debian
Ubuntu
  • Debian9 release party in Tokyo

    We celebrated Debian9 "stretch" release in Tokyo (thanks to Cybozu, Inc. for the place).

  • Debian 9 KDE
  • Debian 9 Stretch Stable Is Released! Check Out The New Features

    Debian 9 Stretch has been released two years after the last major release Debian 8 codenamed Jessie. Before we see Debian 9 features, let me add an anecdote about those funny sounding code names.

  • Debian 9 ‘Stretch’ GNU/Linux Distro Released — Here Are The New Features And Download Links
  • Debian 9 Stretch operating system released
  • Debian devs dedicate new version 9 to the late Ian Murdock
  • Debian 9 released after 26 months of development
  • Debian 9 Edu (Skolelinux) Released — A Complete Linux Distro For Students And Schools
  • alioth needs your help
  • AIMS Desktop 2017.1 released

    The AIMS desktop is a Debian-derived distribution aimed at mathematical and scientific use. This project's first public release, based on Debian 9, is now available. It is a GNOME-based distribution with a bunch of add-on software. "It is maintained by AIMS (The African Institute for Mathematical Sciences), a pan-African network of centres of excellence enabling Africa’s talented students to become innovators driving the continent’s scientific, educational and economic self-sufficiency."

  • [Older] Testing Yunit on Debian Unstable ( Virtual machine )
  • Ubuntu 17.10 to Improve Secure Boot for Booting Windows from GRUB, Enable PIE

    Canonical's Steve Langasek presented the first edition of the Ubuntu Foundations Team weekly newsletter with some exciting information about the upcoming Ubuntu 17.10 (Artful Aardvark) operating system.

    The first Alpha builds of Ubuntu 17.10 are almost here, due for release next week on June 29, 2017, for opt-in flavors, so the Ubuntu developers are working around the clock to add various new features, such as PIE (Position Independent Executables) support enabled by default for better security, as well as some other improvements in many areas of interest like Secure Boot.

    "PIE is now enabled across all architectures by default in Artful. Targeted rebuilds have been done of packages which would break reverse-build-dependencies due to not being compiled with PIE," says Steve Langasek. "The rest of the archive will now pick up PIE support on i386, armhf, and arm64 over the development cycle with rebuilds."

  • Mission Reports

    Well, taking just over 60 days to write again is not generally a good sign. Things have been incredibly busy at the day job. Finding out that a Reduction In Force is expected to happen in late September/early October also sharpens the mind as to the state of the economy. Our CEO at work is somewhat odd, to say the least. Certain acts by the CEO remain incredibly confusing if not utterly baffling.

    In UK-slang, I guess I could probably be considered a "God-botherer". I've been doing work as an evangelist lately. The only product though has been the Lord's Kingdom. One of the elders at church wound up with their wife in a local nursing home due to advanced age as well as deteriorating health so I got tasked with conducting full Sunday services at the nursing home. Compared to my day job, the work has been far more worthwhile serving people in an extended care setting. Sadly it cannot displace my job that I am apparently about to lose in about 90 days or so anyhow thanks to pending actions of the board and CEO.

  • Linux Mint 18.2 “Sonya” Beta Is Now Available
  • Loki Updates for May

    If you’ve recently installed Loki 0.4.1 you may not have noticed that some of these things are new. But for those upgrading from Loki 0.4.0 here’s a list of updates for the month of May.

Ubuntu, UBports, Quick Look at Ubuntu 17.10, Ubuntu Studio, and elementaryOS

Filed under
Ubuntu
  • Building Apps for Linux without Linux

    I spend a lot of my day talking to developers about their Linux software packaging woes. Many of them are using Linux desktops as their primary development platform. Some aren't, and that's their (or their employers) choice. For those developers who run Windows and want to target Linux for their applications, things just got a bit easier.

  • Stable OTA-1, Halium is Heating up, Convergence Works!

    The UBports project is proud to announce Stable OTA-1 for all of our officially supported devices, minus the Nexus 5 (hammerhead) and Nexus 4 (mako).

  • Quick Look at Ubuntu 17.10 June 10 2017 Nightly Release With Gnome as the Default Desktop

    Quick Look at Ubuntu 17.10 Artful Aardvark June 10, 2017, Nightly Release With Gnome as the Default Desktop

  • Ubuntu Studio Audio Production Features

    Ubuntu Studio is a Linux distribution loaded with various programs for music and video production. Many of these open source programs are simple to use, and extremely powerful, making this operating system useful for anyone looking to express their creativity without purchasing expensive software. In this video, we cover some of the best programs for audio production included with Ubuntu Studio.

  • "elementaryOS App Store Ships" - Lunduke Hour - May 17, 2017

    In this episode of the Lunduke Hour I chat with the founder of elementaryOS, Daniel Fore. They just shipped a new version of elementaryOS that includes their recently crowd-funded App Store. We talk about what he thinks it'll take to make this App Store successful where so many others have failed.

Latest round of backports PPA updates include Plasma 5.10.2 for Zesty 17.04

Filed under
Ubuntu

The latest 5.10.2 bugfix update for the Plasma 5.10 desktop is now available in our backports PPA for Zesty Zapus 17.04.

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More in Tux Machines

OpenSUSE fonts – The sleeping beauty guide

Pandora’s box of fonts is one of the many ailments of the distro world. As long as we do not have standards, and some rather strict ones at that, we will continue to suffer from bad fonts, bad contrast, bad ergonomics, and in general, settings that are not designed for sustained, prolonged use. It’s a shame, because humans actually use computers to interface with information, to READ text and interpret knowledge using the power of language. It’s the most critical element of the whole thing. OpenSUSE under-delivers on two fonts – anti-aliasing and hinting options that are less than ideal, and then it lacks the necessary font libraries to make a relevant, modern and pleasing desktop for general use. All of this can be easily solved if there’s more attention, love and passion for the end product. After all, don’t you want people to be spending a lot of time interacting, using and enjoying the distro? Hopefully, one day, all this will be ancient history. We will be able to choose any which system and never worry or wonder how our experience is going to be impacted by the choice of drivers, monitors, software frameworks, or even where we live. For the time being, if you intend on using openSUSE, this little guide should help you achieve a better, smoother, higher-quality rendering of fonts on the screen, allowing you to enjoy the truly neat Plasma desktop to the fullest. Oh, in the openSUSE review, I promised we would handle this, and handle it we did! Take care. Read more

Today in Techrights

Direct Rendering Manager and VR HMDs Under Linux

  • Intel Prepping Support For Huge GTT Pages
    Intel OTC developers are working on support for huge GTT pages for their Direct Rendering Manager driver.
  • Keith Packard's Work On Better Supporting VR HMDs Under Linux With X.Org/DRM
    Earlier this year Keith Packard started a contract gig for Valve working to improve Linux's support for virtual reality head-mounted displays (VR HMDs). In particular, working on Direct Rendering Manager (DRM) and X.Org changes needed so VR HMDs will work well under Linux with the non-NVIDIA drivers. A big part of this work is the concept of DRM leases, a new Vulkan extension, and other changes to the stack.

Software: Security Tools, cmus, Atom-IDE, Skimmer Scanner

  • Security Tools to Check for Viruses and Malware on Linux
    First and foremost, no operating system is 100 percent immune to attack. Whether a machine is online or offline, it can fall victim to malicious code. Although Linux is less prone to such attacks than, say, Windows, there is no absolute when it comes to security. I have witnessed, first hand, Linux servers hit by rootkits that were so nasty, the only solution was to reinstall and hope the data backup was current. I’ve been a victim of a (very brief) hacker getting onto my desktop, because I accidentally left desktop sharing running (that was certainly an eye opener). The lesson? Even Linux can be vulnerable. So why does Linux need tools to prevent viruses, malware, and rootkits? It should be obvious why every server needs protection from rootkits — because once you are hit with a rootkit, all bets are off as to whether you can recover without reinstalling the platform. It’s antivirus and anti-malware where admins start getting a bit confused. Let me put it simply — if your server (or desktop for that matter) makes use of Samba or sshfs (or any other sharing means), those files will be opened by users running operating systems that are vulnerable. Do you really want to take the chance that your Samba share directory could be dishing out files that contain malicious code? If that should happen, your job becomes exponentially more difficult. Similarly, if that Linux machine performs as a mail server, you would be remiss to not include AV scanning (lest your users be forwarding malicious mail).
  • cmus – A Small, Fast And Powerful Console Music Player For Linux
    You may ask a question yourself when you see this article. Is it possible to listen music in Linux terminal? Yes because nothing is impossible in Linux. We have covered many popular GUI-based media players in our previous articles but we didn’t cover any CLI based media players as of now, so today we are going to cover about cmus, is one of the famous console-based media players among others (For CLI, very few applications is available in Linux).
  • You Can Now Transform the Atom Hackable Text Editor into an IDE with Atom-IDE
    GitHub and Facebook recently launched a set of tools that promise to allow you to transform your Atom hackable text editor into a veritable IDE (Integrated Development Environment). They call the project Atom-IDE. With the release of Atom 1.21 Beta last week, GitHub introduced Language Server Protocol support to integrate its brand-new Atom-IDE project, which comes with built-in support for five popular language servers, including JavaScript, TypeScript, PHP, Java, C#, and Flow. But many others will come with future Atom updates.
  • This open-source Android app is designed to detect nearby credit card skimmers
    Protecting our data is a constant battle, especially as technology continues to advance. A recent trend that has popped up is the installation of credit card skimmers, especially at locations such as gas pumps. With a simple piece of hardware and 30 seconds to install it, a hacker can easily steal credit card numbers from a gas pump without anyone knowing. Now, an open-source app for Android is attempting to help users avoid these skimmers.