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Ubuntu

Leftovers: Ubuntu

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Ubuntu
  • Raspberry Pi competitor taps Ubuntu community

    The Orange Pi compute module is based on a quad-core 64 bit ARM Cortex A7 Allwinner SoC. It is available in several models from the entry level Orange Pi Zero to the 2Gb of RAM Orange Pi Plus 2.

    The app store allows developers to share their applications, projects and scripts between themselves and with the wider Orange Pi community.

  • Ubuntu App Store Created For Orange Pi Mini PC

    Canonical has announced the launch of a dedicated Ubuntu App Store for the Orange Pi mini PC providing a wide range of different applications that can be easily installed on the single board computer.

    To recap the Orange Pi mini PC is equipped with a quad-core 64 bit ARM Cortex A7 Allwinner SoC and is available in a number of different versions from the entry level Orange Pi Zero to the 2GB of RAM Orange Pi Plus 2.

  • Canonical Goes Long for Ubuntu Server Support

    When it comes to production-grade deployments of operating systems on servers, some servers systems will stay in production longer than others. While consumers refresh hardware and software rapidly, that is typically not always the case for many different reasons, in enterprise deployments.

Ubuntu: A follow-up on 32-bit powerpc architecture

Filed under
Ubuntu

Dear developers,

Last year, I wrote[1] to let you know that the powerpc architecture would be
dropped from zesty as of Feature Freeze.

We are well into Feature Freeze at this point, so an update is overdue. As
of Feature Freeze in February, the status is that powerpc packages are no
longer considered for proposed-migration, and we have discontinued all CD
image builds for powerpc in zesty.

Read more

How Canonical makes money from Ubuntu

Filed under
Ubuntu

There are three active LTS releases of Ubuntu: 12.04, 14.04 and 16.04. The support for 12.04 is ending this year on April 28, 2017. While Canonical is encouraging users to upgrade to 14.04 or 16.04 LTS, there are still a lot of companies using 12.04.

Customers running critical services on their servers and cloud really don’t like frequent upgrades. They tweak, tune and customize different components of their infrastructure and when you bring in too many changes at the same time with a major release upgrade, something is going to break.

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Orange Pi PCs get Ubuntu App Store thanks to Canonical

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Ubuntu

There’s no shortage of small, low-power PC-on-a-module devices designed to piggyback on the success of the Raspberry Pi. But one problem with some of these cheap single board computers is that they don’t have the same kind of user and developer community as the Raspberry Pi, which can make it harder to get official support.

So it’s interesting to see that the makers of the Orange Pi line of products have partnered with Ubuntu Linux maker Canonical to offer an official app store for Orange Pi products running Ubuntu software.

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Ubuntu 17.04 — Official Mascot Artwork Revealed

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Ubuntu

With its stable release now under a month away, Canonical has revealed the official mascot artwork for Ubuntu 17.04 ‘Zesty Zapus’.

In keeping with previous Ubuntu mascots the new Zesty Zapus graphic resembles a folded paper mouse.

Created by the Canonical design team, the official Zesty Zapus graphic will appear in Ubuntu 17.04 desktop documentation and show up on merchandise, like the traditional official release t-shirt, and event banners.

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Also today:

Ubuntu 12.04 LTS Lives Beyond 5 Years

Filed under
Ubuntu

Linux Mint and Mir 1.0

Filed under
Debian
Ubuntu
  • Refreshed stable Linux Mint Debian Edition (LMDE) 2 'Betsy' ISO images now available
  • Mir and Zesty

    Mir is continuing to make progress towards a 1.0 release and, meanwhile, Zesty Zapus (Ubuntu 17.04) is continuing to make progress towards final freeze.

  • Mir 1.0 Expected To Come Early In Ubuntu 17.10 Cycle

    Canonical developer Alan Griffiths has shared a few details about getting Mir 1.0 ready for release.

    Long story short, they are expecting to officially release Mir 1.0 with an ABI guarantee early in the Ubuntu 17.10 development cycle. It's yet to be firmly decided whether there will be one major release before going to v1.0 (it would be v0.27), but it's looking like not too far after Ubuntu 17.04 is released next month, we could see Mir 1.0 declared.

Ubuntu-Based Black Lab Linux Gets New Weekly Build with Linux 4.8, Unity Desktop

Filed under
Ubuntu

Another week, another weekly build of the Ubuntu-based Black Lab Linux operating system is available for download, as Black Lab Software Robert J. Dohnert informed Softpedia.

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Canonical announces Ubuntu Linux 12.04 ESM (Extended Security Maintenance)

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Ubuntu

On April 25th, Ubuntu Linux 12.04 LTS will no longer be supported by Canonical. Why? That is the 5 year anniversary of the release, which is the amount of support time given to an LTS (Long Term Support) version of the Linux distribution.

For many home users, this really doesn't matter, as they have probably already upgraded to a newer version. Unfortunately, some businesses do not upgrade as regularly. In fact, some organizations may not be ready to move on from Ubuntu 12.04. Tough luck? Not at all. Today, Canonical introduces Ubuntu Linux 12.04 ESM. This "Extended Security Maintenance" release is not free, however -- organizations must pay for the extended support.

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Tiny, open spec quad -A53 SBC sells for $15

Filed under
Ubuntu

FriendlyElec’s 40 x 40mm, Ubuntu Core ready “NanoPi Neo2” updates the Neo with a 64-bit Allwinner H5 and a GbE port.

FriendlyElec (FriendlyARM) has added to its line of tiny, open spec NanoPi Neo SBCs with a Neo2 model that advances to an ARMv8 architecture. Whereas the similarly 40 x 40mm NanoPi Neo and wireless-enabled NanoPi Neo Air run Ubuntu Core on a quad-core, Cortex-A7 Allwinner H3 clocked to 1.2GHz, the NanoPi Neo2 moves up to a quad-core, Cortex-A53 Allwinner H5. The A5, which is also found on the Orange Pi PC 2 hacker SBC, is joined by a higher-end Mali-450 GPU. No clock rate is specified.

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More in Tux Machines

Linux and FOSS Events

  • Keynote: State of the Union - Jim Zemlin, Executive Director, The Linux Foundation
    As the open source community continues to grow, Jim Zemlin, Executive Director of The Linux Foundation, says the Foundation’s goal remains the same: to create a sustainable ecosystem for open source technology through good governance and innovation.
  • Open Source for Science + Innovation
    We are bringing together open source and open science specialists to talk about the “how and why” of open source and open science. Members of these communities will give brief talks which are followed by open and lively discussions open to the audience. Talks will highlight the role of openness in stimulating innovation but may also touch upon how openness appears to some to conflict with intellectual property interests.
  • Announcing the Equal Rating Innovation Challenge Winners
    Six months ago, we created the Equal Rating Innovation Challenge to add an additional dimension to the important work Mozilla has been leading around the concept of “Equal Rating.” In addition to policy and research, we wanted to push the boundaries and find news ways to provide affordable access to the Internet while preserving net neutrality. An open call for new ideas was the ideal vehicle.

Docker/Kubernetes/Containers

  • Containerization Leaders Explore Possible Standardized Data Storage Interface
    A group of engineers from every leading container orchestrator maker have gathered together, virtually, around an initiative to explore a common lexicon for container-based data storage. Initially proposed by Mesosphere’s Benjamin Hindman, the Container Storage Interface initiative — which, for now, is essentially a GitHub document — is exploring the issue of whether the community at large, and their users, would benefit from a standardized API for addressing and managing storage volumes.
  • What are the top open source tools for Docker management?
  • Enterprise container DevOps steps up its game with Kubernetes 1.6
    Managing containers isn't easy. That's where such programs as Docker swarm mode, Kubernetes, and Mesosphere can make or break your containers initiatives. Perhaps the most popular of these, Kubernetes, has a new release, Kubernetes 1.6, that expands its reach by 50 percent to 5,000 node clusters. Conservatively, that means Kubernetes can manage 25,000 Docker containers at once.

Security Leftovers

  • Someone is putting lots of work into hacking Github developers [Ed: Dan Goodin doesn't know that everything is under attack and cracking attempts just about all the time?]
    Open-source developers who use Github are in the cross-hairs of advanced malware that has steal passwords, download sensitive files, take screenshots, and self-destruct when necessary.
  • Security Orchestration and Incident Response
    Technology continues to advance, and this is all a changing target. Eventually, computers will become intelligent enough to replace people at real-time incident response. My guess, though, is that computers are not going to get there by collecting enough data to be certain. More likely, they'll develop the ability to exhibit understanding and operate in a world of uncertainty. That's a much harder goal. Yes, today, this is all science fiction. But it's not stupid science fiction, and it might become reality during the lifetimes of our children. Until then, we need people in the loop. Orchestration is a way to achieve that.

Leftover: Development (Linux)

  • Swan: Better Linux on Windows
    If you are a Linux user that has to use Windows — or even a Windows user that needs some Linux support — Cygwin has long been a great tool for getting things done. It provides a nearly complete Linux toolset. It also provides almost the entire Linux API, so that anything it doesn’t supply can probably be built from source. You can even write code on Windows, compile and test it and (usually) port it over to Linux painlessly.
  • Lint for Shell Scripters
    It used to be one of the joys of writing embedded software was never having to deploy shell scripts. But now with platforms like the Raspberry Pi becoming very common, Linux shell scripts can be a big part of a system–even the whole system, in some cases. How do you know your shell script is error-free before you deploy it? Of course, nothing can catch all errors, but you might try ShellCheck.
  • Android: Enabling mainline graphics
    Android uses the HWC API to communicate with graphics hardware. This API is not supported on the mainline Linux graphics stack, but by using drm_hwcomposer as a shim it now is. The HWC (Hardware Composer) API is used by SurfaceFlinger for compositing layers to the screen. The HWC abstracts objects such as overlays and 2D blitters and helps offload some work that would normally be done with OpenGL. SurfaceFlinger on the other hand accepts buffers from multiple sources, composites them, and sends them to the display.
  • Collabora's Devs Make Android's HWC API Work in Mainline Linux Graphics Stack
    Collabora's Mark Filion informs Softpedia today about the latest work done by various Collabora developers in collaboration with Google's ChromeOS team to enable mainline graphics on Android. The latest blog post published by Collabora's Robert Foss reveals the fact that both team managed to develop a shim called drm_hwcomposer, which should enable Android's HWC (Hardware Composer) API to communicate with the graphics hardware, including Android 7.0's version 2 HWC API.