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Ubuntu

Ubuntu 18.04 LTS Integrates Canonical Livepatch for Rebootless Kernel Updates

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Ubuntu

Canonical Livepatch is a free and commercial solution for applying Linux kernel updates without rebooting your Ubuntu computer. Initially designed for the Ubuntu 16.04 LTS (Xenial Xerus) operating system series, Canonical's kernel livepatch service is coming in an easier-to-use form in Ubuntu 18.04 LTS, due for release on April 26.

The Software & Updates utility found in the default Ubuntu installation now integrates the Canonical Livepatch service in the Updates tab, but, to use it, you'll have to create an Ubuntu SSO (Single Sign-On) account and login with it by clicking on the "Sign In" button (see the screenshot gallery below for details).

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Open spec router SBC has M.2 and a pair each of SATA, GbE, and HDMI

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Android
Linux
Debian
Ubuntu

SinoVoip has launched a $93 “Banana Pi BPI-W2” multimedia router and NAS board that runs Android or Linux on a quad -A53 Realtek RTD129, and offers 2x GbE, 2x SATA 3.0, 3x M.2, HDMI in and out, and a 40-pin RPi connector.

After starting off its Spring collection earlier this week with a pair of ESP32 based Banana Pi boards, SinoVoip has returned to the Linux/Android world to release a Banana Pi BPI-W2 “multimedia network” and “smart NAS” router SBC. Available for $93 on AliExpress, the BPI-W2 has a faster processor and more advanced features than last year’s similarly sized (148 x 100.5mm) Banana Pi BPI-R2, which is available for $89.50 on AliExpress. However, the new model has only two Gigabit Ethernet ports instead of four.

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Ubuntu 18.04 LTS Will Let Users Choose Between Normal and Minimal Installations

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Ubuntu

Canonical's upcoming Ubuntu 18.04 LTS (Bionic Beaver) operating system is coming with numerous new changes, besides updated components and various other improvements.

In February, we took a look at the new Minimal Installation feature that would allow users to install a version of the operating system that includes only a few pre-installed apps, but it appears that Canonical recently changed the graphical installer to add another option for users.

Earlier development versions of Ubuntu 18.04 LTS only showed a "Minimal Installation" option on the "Preparing to Install Ubuntu" screen of the graphical installer, noting the fact that "This will install a minimal desktop environment with a browser and utilities."

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Also: Ubuntu available on IBM LinuxOne Rockhopper II

Ubuntu Is Now Available on the IBM LinuxONE Rockhopper II and IBM z14 Model ZR1

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Ubuntu

It appears that Canonical worked closely with IBM to ensure Ubuntu works out-of-the-box on IBM's recently announced IBM z14 Model ZR1 and IBM LinuxONE Rockhopper II servers, along with the company's LXD next-generation system container manager, OpenStack open-source software platform for cloud computing, Juju application and service modelling tool, and Canonical’s Distribution of Kubernetes.

These will provide companies and developers with all the tools they need to get the job done, building and deploying apps on their infrastructures at a large scale within a single system. For hybrid-cloud environments, IBM's new systems also come with a Docker-certified infrastructure for Docker Enterprise Edition (EE), which integrates management and scale tested on up to 330,000 Docker containers.

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Ubuntu 18.04 Makes it Easier to Install Kernel Updates without Rebooting

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Linux
Ubuntu

With Ubuntu 18.04 LTS Canonical is making it super easy to take advantage of Linux kernel live patching.

Live patching lets you install and apply critical Linux kernel security updates without rebooting your system.

This means you can keep your computer safe at kernel level without any impact on your uptime or productivity.

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Also: Ubuntu Server development summary – 10 April 2018

Debian and Canonical: Build Tools, PET, LXD, MAAS

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Debian
Ubuntu
  • A tale of three Debian build tools

    Many people have asked me about my Debian workflow. Which is funny, because it's hard to believe that when you use three different build tools that you're doing it right, but I have figured out a process that works for me. I use git-buildpackage (gbp), sbuild, and pbuilder, each for different purposes. Let me describe why and how I use each, and the possible downsides of each tool.

    Note: This blog post is aimed at people already familiar with Debian packaging, particularly using Vcs-Git. If you'd like to learn more about the basics of Debian packaging, I recommend you check out my Clojure Packaging Tutorial and my talk about packaging Leiningen.

  • My Free Software Activities in March 2018

    Welcome to gambaru.de. Here is my monthly report that covers what I have been doing for Debian. If you’re interested in Java, Games and LTS topics, this might be interesting for you.

  • Migrating PET features to distro-tracker

    After joining the Debian Perl Team some time ago, PET has helped me a lot to find work to do in the team context, and also helped the whole team in our workflow. For those who do not know what PET is: “a collection of scripts that gather information about your (or your group’s) packages. It allows you to see in a bird’s eye view the health of hundreds of packages, instantly realizing where work is needed.”. PET became an important project since about 20 Debian teams were using it, including Perl and Ruby teams in which I am more active.

  • LXD weekly status #42

    As this was the week following our major 3.0 release, we’ve been very actively working on early bug reports and sorting out packaging for this in the distros.

    This led to quite a number of bugfixes being done, issues investigated and a large number of updates to our snap and Debian packages for the various components.

    We expect to keep this focus on bugfixing for the next 2-3 weeks so that we can ensure we meet our usual quality expectations after a major release and offer a smooth upgrade to our users. We’re also doing some work refreshing our 2.0 stable branches in preparation for the last major bugfix release of the projects before they enter the much slower security-only phase of their support.

  • Design and Web team summary – 10 April 2018

    The MAAS squad have been hard at work fixing any teething problems, since the release of the latest Vanilla on MAAS. The main focus has been on the spacing and padding in tables, to stop columns from wrapping.

You Can Now Install Ubuntu's New Community Theme on Ubuntu 18.04 LTS as a Snap

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Ubuntu

Ubuntu contributor Didier Roche announced today that Ubuntu 18.04 LTS early adopters can now install the Communitheme Ubuntu theme as a Snap package on their computers. You can install it right now by executing the "snap install communitheme" command in the Terminal app.

The theme is available in multiple variants, for the GTK+ 2, GTK+ 3, and Qt frameworks, as well as for the GNOME Shell user interface in both the STABLE and EDGE Snap channels. While most users should install the Communitheme from the stable channel, bleeding-edgers can install it using the "snap install communitheme --edge" command.

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Ubuntu: A Short Review to Ubuntu 18.04 Beta 2, Theme, Testing Weeks and CPLANE

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Ubuntu
  • A Short Review to Ubuntu 18.04 Beta 2

    Ubuntu 18.04 LTS "Bionic Beaver" is planned to be released on this April 26, 2018. Here's a short review to the beta 2 version (aka al beta): it has a new user interface compared to the previous 16.04 LTS, it needs ~1.2GiB of RAM at idle time, it brings latest LibreOffice and Firefox, and it still uses Ubiquity graphical installer. This review brings you the screenshots and information after I installed the daily ISO image on my Acer Aspire One laptop. It feels very smooth on 4GB of RAM and it's very exciting for us to wait the final stable release!

  • Welcome To The (Ubuntu) Bionic Age: New WIP ubuntu theme as a snap

    Before the release of Ubuntu 18.04 LTS, I wanted to write a few words to update you since our first call for a theme crafted by the community.

  • Should Ubuntu Linux Replace Alpha/Beta Release Model With “Testing Weeks”?

    One of the biggest advantages of open source technology projects is that everybody from the community is free to float an idea and if it gains community support, it could be turned into reality. Along the similar lines, well-known Ubuntu developer Simon Quigley has suggested an idea that might change the Ubuntu Linux development process.

  • Canonical and CPLANE partner to simplify cloud management

    Recently announced, Canonical and CPLANE will now offer a distributed cloud orchestration and software-defined networking solution to simplify the complexity of managing distributed clouds.

    Canonical will deliver high-performance distributed cloud orchestration to its customers with CPLANE’s Multi-Site Manager (MSM). MSM delivers clouds that scale from a single server for highly-distributed edge clouds to support IoT and edge computing applications, to large data centers with thousands of servers for shared cloud services. Canonical will also provide fully-integrated cloud networking with CPLANE’s Dynamic Virtual Networks – Data Center (DVNd) product. DVNd quickly connects virtual resources within and across multiple clouds to provide secure, end-to-end network connectivity with quality of service.

Are You Ready for Lubuntu Next 18.04?

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Ubuntu

It's still under development but it's lightweight and looks promising. It has some problems but for those love testing, it's very interesting new distro, a new Lubuntu derivative with new user interface and a unique set of applications. And finally, its memory usage is so low, almost similar to Lubuntu 18.04 beta 2 itself (which is only ~230MiB), so Lubuntu Next could be considered as a full-featured Lubuntu alternative within its lightweight league.

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Also: This Week in Lubuntu Development #2

Debian and Ubuntu: debhelper, Ubuntu on USB, Test Weeks, Free Culture Showcase

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Debian
Ubuntu
  • Build system changes in debhelper

    Since debhelper/11.2.1[1], we now support using cmake for configure and ninja for build + test as an alternative to cmake for configure and make for build + test. This change was proposed by Kyle Edwards in Debian bug #895044. You can try this new combination by specifying “cmake+ninja” as build system.

  • Run Ubuntu 18.04 From USB Stick

    Ubuntu 18.04 is a great operating system. It is in beta at the time of this writing. Everyone is so excited and eagerly waiting for its release even as we speak. If you’re one of them, you may wish to carry your favorite Linux distribution with you all the time. Have you ever thought about running Ubuntu 18.04 from a USB stick? Well it is possible. You can run Ubuntu 18.04 from a USB stick. That way your workstation is with you wherever you go. You don’t have to use other people’s setup, you can use your own comfortable setup, also your favorite softwares.

  • Ubuntu Developer Floats The Idea Of "Test Weeks" To Replace Early Alpha/Beta Releases

    Prominent Ubuntu community developer Simon Quigley has sparked a discussion about Ubuntu's release milestones and the possibility of moving away with their alpha and beta one milestones moving forward.

    Quigley's proposal after consulting with the Xubuntu / Ubuntu MATE / Kubuntu / Ubuntu Budgie teams was using "testing weeks" to replace the previous formal alpha / beta releases. During testing weeks, users would be encouraged to use the latest daily ISOs rather than a blessed "alpha" or "beta" image.

  • Announcing the Ubuntu 18.04 LTS Free Culture Showcase winners

    In just under 3 weeks, Ubuntu 18.04 LTS launches. This exciting new release is a new Long Term Support release and will introduce many Ubuntu users to GNOME Shell and a closer upstream experience. In addition, Ubuntu developers have been working long and hard to ensure that 18.04 is a big, brilliant release that builds a bridge from 16.04 LTS to a better, bigger platform that can be built upon, without becoming unnecessarily boisterous.

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Ryzen 7 2700X CPUFreq Scaling Governor Benchmarks On Ubuntu Linux

With this week's Ryzen 5 2600X + Ryzen 7 2700X benchmarks some thought the CPUFreq scaling driver or rather its governors may have been limiting the performance of these Zen+ CPUs, so I ran some additional benchmarks this weekend. Those launch-day Ryzen 5 2600X / Ryzen 7 2700X Ubuntu Linux benchmarks were using the "performance" governor, but some have alleged that the performance governor may now actually hurt AMD systems... Ondemand, of course, is the default CPUFreq governor on Ubuntu and most other Linux distributions. Some also have said the "schedutil" governor that makes use of the kernel's scheduler utilization data may do better on AMD. So I ran some extra benchmarks while changing between CPUFreq's ondemand (default), performance (normally the best for performance, and what was used in our CPU tests), schedutil (the newest option), and powersave (if you really just care about conserving power). Read more