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Ubuntu

BQ Aquaris M10 Ubuntu Edition review: A rocky start to a new era

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Reviews
Ubuntu

Let me be clear. In reviewing the Aquaris M10, I was very aware that I was reviewing not just the device but the Ubuntu mobile platform. In fact, the review is less about the device than about where Ubuntu stands now in the tablet space and the potential and possibilities the future holds.

Ubuntu mobile is a very promising platform; it just needs some constructive feedback so that developers can improve the user experience. I consider this tablet something similar to Google Glass: a prototype that gives you a glimpse of what to expect from Ubuntu on tablets.

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Pinguy OS Developer Wants to Pull the Plug On His Ubuntu-Based Operating System

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OS
Ubuntu

Just a few minutes ago, Antoni Roman, the developer of the Ubuntu-based Pinguy OS GNU/Linux operating system wrote a short blog post on the distro's website to inform the community that he wants to pull the plug on the entire project.

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Canonical Has Work To Do: The BQ Aquaris M10 Ubuntu Tablet, Hands On

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Ubuntu

The BQ Aquaris M10 is a 10.1-inch touchscreen tablet powered by Ubuntu Core, and it can be used like a laptop by connecting a keyboard and mouse. The device has the ability to alter its navigation interface by connecting to an external display, similar to Microsoft's Continuum, with a feature Canonical calls “convergence.”

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Ubuntu Core Now Ready for Screenly, a Digital Signage Solution for Raspberry Pi

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Linux
Ubuntu

Today, May 18, 2016, Canonical has announced a partnership with Screenly to bring the Snappy Ubuntu Core operating system to the world's most popular digital signage solution for the Raspberry Pi.

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Leftovers: Ubuntu and Debian

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Debian
Ubuntu
  • ZFS to be offered by Debian

    The Debian GNU/Linux distribution will include the ZFS filesystem as a choice from now on, according to an announcement by Petter Reinholdtsen, the developer responsible.

    ZFS is a filesystem developed by Sun Microsystems and now owned by Oracle. The licence under which it is released, the Common Development and Distribution Licence, is not compatible with the GNU General Public Licence under which the Linux kernel is released.

    According to Ana Guerrero López, a member of the Debian publicity team, the inclusion of ZFS was announced slightly more than a year ago, in April 2015 by the project leader at the time, Lucas Nussbaum.

    In an email, Nussbaum wrote "We received legal advice from Software Freedom Law Centre about the inclusion of libdvdcss and ZFS in Debian, which should unblock the situation in both cases and enable us to ship them in Debian soon."

  • 10 Alternative Web Browsers for Ubuntu Linux

    While Firefox is currently the default web browser for Ubuntu 16.04, there are many alternative and special-purpose browsers available to install on Linux. If you're looking for a break from Firefox or need a browser to accomplish a special task, there's probably an alternative browser out there for you.

  • It's Easy Trying Out Intel's OpenGL 4.2 Mesa Driver On Ubuntu 16.04

Mark Shuttleworth: We Are at Our Best When We Are Constantly Improving

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Ubuntu

Earlier today, May 17, 2016, Canonical and Ubuntu founder Mark Shuttleworth published a new blog entry on his website to thank the Ubuntu Community Council for their hard work.

According to Mark Shuttleworth, the Community Council (CC) has done a great job lately at keeping the Ubuntu community happy, unblocked, and healthy. Their role in the grandiose Ubuntu project, for those not in the known, is a critical one if Ubuntu, as a community, wants to be at the top of its game.

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Ubuntu Touch OTA-12 Will Be More About Fixes than Features, Says Canonical

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Ubuntu

We promised to keep our Ubuntu Phone and Ubuntu Tablet readers informed about the latest developments in the Ubuntu Touch mobile operating system, and today we have interesting news to share.

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An Everyday Linux User Review Of Ubuntu 16.04 - The Good, The Bad And The Not Quite So Ugly

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Reviews
Ubuntu

The Good

The developers do appear to listen to their users. Everything that people have asked for in the past few years has been implemented in one way or another.

The Bad

This is a long term support release and it feels like it isn't quite ready. I find it hard to believe that nobody working on Ubuntu tried a clean install, followed by installing some of the more popular applications like Chrome, Dropbox and Steam.

The Not Quite So Ugly

The Software Centre has gone.

This would have been great as a point release, say a 16.10 or a 17.04 because you expect some experimentation and you expect the odd cock-up.

The LTS release should be ready to go from day one with only minor issues. Sadly that isn't the case.

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Canonical to Showcase Ubuntu Core on NXP/Freescale i.MX 6, HiKey at OSCON 2016

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Ubuntu

O'Reilly OSCON 2016, the long-anticipated Open Source convention, is upon us, and it looks like Canonical is there to showcase its latest Snappy Ubuntu Core innovations.

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Ubuntu, Juju, Kubernetes and the DevOps DISCO [VIDEO]

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Ubuntu

There is no shortage of different ways to deploy and manage applications on servers in 2016. Mark Shuttleworth, the founder of Ubuntu Linux and Canonical Inc., has been advocating for the use of Juju and its system of "charms" to help manage server applications since 2011 with the release of Ubuntu 11.10, the "Oneiric Ocelot."

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Also: Portable Apps for Ubuntu 16.04 LTS (Xenial Xerus) Now Available for Download

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More in Tux Machines

today's howtos

Leftovers: Gaming

Leftovers: KDE (Akonadi, KWin)

  • Akonadi for e-mail needs to die
    So, I'm officially giving up on kmail2 (i.e., the Akonadi-based version of kmail) on the last one of my PCs now. I have tried hard and put in a lot of effort to get it working, but it costs me a significant amount of time and effort just to be able to receive and read e-mail - meaning hanging IMAP resources every few minutes, the feared "Multiple merge candidates" bug popping up again and again, and other surprise events. That is plainly not acceptable in the workplace, where I need to rely on e-mail as means of communication. By leaving kmail2 I seem to be following many many other people... Even dedicated KDE enthusiasts that I know have by now migrated to Trojita or Thunderbird.
  • Virtual keyboard support in KWin/Wayland 5.7
    Over the last weeks I worked on improved input device support in KWin/Wayland and support for virtual keyboard. KWin 5.7 will integrate the new QtVirtualKeyboard module which is now available under GPLv3. For us this means that we have access to a high quality QML based keyboard. For Qt it means that the virtual keyboard is exposed to more users and thanks to the open source nature it means that we can upstream fixes.
  • Virtual Keyboard Support For KWin / KDE Wayland 5.7
    The latest KWin/Wayland hacking project by Martin Gräßlin is adding virtual keyboard support to KWin for the upcoming KDE Plasma 5.7 release. This virtual keyboard support is powered by the QtVirtualKeyboard module and provides a high-quality, QML-based keyboard that will work on KWin/Wayland when no hardware keyboard is available. Implementing this virtual keyboard support with Wayland compatibility was actually quite a feat, but has now become a reality thanks to the work by Martin.

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