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Ubuntu

Ubuntu 16.04.5 LTS, Lubuntu 16.04.5, and UBports' Ubuntu Touch on 16.04.x

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Ubuntu
  • Ubuntu 16.04.5 LTS Released on Heels of Ubuntu 18.04 LTS, Bundles All Past Stable Release Updates

    A few days ago we covered the release of Ubuntu 18.04 LTS, and also the NCSC’s guidelines on Ubuntu 18.04 security, but there’s more news yet from the Ubuntu team – they just released Ubuntu 16.04.5 Xenial Xerus LTS (Long Term Support) for folks who will not upgrade to Ubuntu 18.04 LTS.

    This latest update to Ubuntu 16.04 has a new hardware enablement stack intended to work with the latest hardware out-of-the-box. Support for this is offered on all architectures except 32-bit powerpc, and it is installed by default when using the desktop images as an installation media. Ubuntu Server will default to installing the GA kernel, but users can optionally choose to install the HWE kernel instead.

  • Ubuntu 16.04.5 LTS Released, Available to Download Now

    Download Ubuntu 16.04.5 LTS, the fifth (and final) point release of Ubuntu 16.04 LTS. It features Linux kernel 4.15, Xorg updates, and various bug fixes.

  • Ubuntu 16.04.5 LTS released

    The Ubuntu team is pleased to announce the release of Ubuntu 16.04.5 LTS (Long-Term Support) for its Desktop, Server, and Cloud products, as well as other flavours of Ubuntu with long-term support.

    Like previous LTS series’, 16.04.5 includes hardware enablement stacks for use on newer hardware. This support is offered on all architectures except for 32-bit powerpc, and is installed by default when using one of the desktop images. Ubuntu Server defaults to installing the GA kernel, however you may select the HWE kernel from the installer bootloader.

    As usual, this point release includes many updates, and updated installation media has been provided so that fewer updates will need to be downloaded after installation. These include security updates and corrections for other high-impact bugs, with a focus on maintaining stability and compatibility with Ubuntu 16.04 LTS.

  • Lubuntu 16.04.5 has been released!

    Thanks to all the hard work from our contributors, we are pleased to announce that Lubuntu 16.04.5 LTS has been released!

  • UBports' Ubuntu Touch Unlikely To Move To Ubuntu 18.04 Anytime Soon

    Given that it was only earlier this summer when UBports' Ubuntu Touch OTA-4 upgraded to an Ubuntu 16.04 LTS base, you might be wondering when they intend to transition to Ubuntu 18.04 LTS... But don't hold your breath.

    During the latest Ubuntu Touch Q&A, the matter came up of if/when they will transition from Ubuntu 16.04 to Ubuntu 18.04 as the newest Long Term Support release. But long story short is they have no immediate plans to do so.

    The resources of the community-driven UBports is limited as is and the migration to Ubuntu 18.04 would require systemd, among other changes, as well as 18.04 using newer versions of Mir, Unity 8, and libhybris that would conflict with the current UBports work.

Proprietary: ​Opera as Snap on GNU/Linux, Chrome 69 Beta

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Software
Ubuntu
  • Opera launches as a Snap for Linux users

    Opera and Canonical today announce that Opera, the popular web browser, is now available as a Snap in the Snap Store. Opera is the latest notable addition to the Snap Store providing ever more choice to Linux users via an easy to install, always up to date application direct from the software vendor.

    Opera, founded in 1995 in Oslo has been delivering browsers and AI-driven content delivery products to 322 million users worldwide across a range of devices and operating systems. It is responsible for now standardised browser features such as tabs or speed dial. Currently, it is the browser of choice for more demanding users who seek features such as a built-in VPN, ad blocker or a separate messengers sidebar.

  • ​Opera is available in a Snap on Linux

    They've done this by packing Opera into a Snap in the Snap Store. The Opera snap is supported on Debian, Elementary, Fedora, Linux Mint, Manjaro, OpenSUSE, Ubuntu, and other Linux distributions.

    Snaps are containerised software packages. They're designed to work securely within any Linux environment across desktop, the cloud, and IoT devices. Thousands of snaps have been launched since 2016. Users like them because they come with automatic updates and roll-back features.

    Snaps also are a bit more secure than most Linux apps. They make it easier for developers to roll out their programs. When your program in encased in a Snap, you don't need to worry about the distribution's native packaging or whether the desktop distro includes a vital library your application needs.

  • Opera Web Browser Is Now Available as a Snap on Ubuntu, Other Linux Distros

    Canonical and Opera Software informs Softpedia today about the availability of the Chromium-based Opera web browser as a Snap package in the Snap Store for Ubuntu and supported Linux-based operating systems.

    Used by more than 322 million users worldwide on a wide range of devices and computer operating systems, including GNU/Linux, macOS, and Microsoft Windows, Opera is a very popular web browser based on the latest technologies from the open-source Chromium project. On Linux platforms, users can install Opera as DEB and RPM packages.

  • Opera Browser is Now Available in the Ubuntu Snap Store

    It just got a whole lot easier to install the Opera web browser on Ubuntu and other Linux distros. Canonical has announced that the well-known web browser is now available as a Snap app in the Ubuntu Snap store.

  • Chrome 69 Beta: CSS tricks, and more

    Unless otherwise noted, changes described below apply to the newest Chrome Beta channel release for Android, Chrome OS, Linux, macOS, and Windows. View a complete list of the features in Chrome 69 on ChromeStatus.com. Chrome 69 is beta as of August 2.

  • Chrome 69 Beta Released With AV1 Decode & Various CSS Additions

    Google has rolled out the Chrome 69 beta web-browser update today for Linux, Android, and other supported platforms.

    Chrome 69 Beta is quite exciting in that it introduces initial support for AV1 video decoding support -- albeit still in very early form but now possible thanks to AV1 v1.0 being firmed up. There are also a number of CSS styling enhancements with Chrome 69 Beta including support for conic gradients, new margin/padding/border properties, scroll snap positions, display cutouts, and more.

How to Install and Configure Sound Themes in Ubuntu

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Ubuntu

This beginner’s guide will explain how you can install sound themes in Ubuntu.

If you like to give your desktop different look and feel via various themes, icon themes, then why not sound also. There are plenty of cool sound themes available in Ubuntu covering lots of events. This gives a feel of life in your Ubuntu desktop experience, rather than a ‘silent’ usage. Here’s how you can install sound theme in Ubuntu.

We have chosen “Smooth” sound theme containing 58 system events.

Read more

Ubuntu 16.04.5 LTS (Xenial Xerus) Released as Last in the Series, Download Now

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Ubuntu

Every LTS (Long Term Support) version of the Ubuntu Linux operating system is supported by Canonical with security and software updates for five years on the Ubuntu Desktop, Server, and Cloud images, and they received a total of five point releases every six months or so.

Dubbed Xenial Xerus, Ubuntu 16.04 LTS was released on April 21, 2016, with the Unity desktop environment, and it's supported until April 2021. The Ubuntu 16.04.5 LTS point release is the last in the series and like all the previous point releases, it represents an up-to-date installation medium for those who want to install a fresh Ubuntu 16.04 LTS system.

Read more

Also: Ubuntu 16.04.5 LTS Released For Those Not Yet Upgrading To Ubuntu 18.04

Ubuntu: uCaresystem, Server, and National Cyber Security Centre (NCSC)

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Ubuntu
  • How to keep your Ubuntu Linux systems updated with uCaresystem

    If you're like me, you prefer to keep your Linux systems as up to date as possible. After all, vulnerabilities are patched, new features are added, and a server or desktop can be made to run more smoothly and securely by keeping it as "in the now" as possible. To that end, most users will open up a terminal window and run the tried-and-true sudo apt-get update && sudo apt-get upgrade command to catch anything available for their system.

    The thing is, those two commands either may not catch everything or they leave behind outdated files that can lead to problems down the road. Of course, you could add to your list of commands the likes of sudo apt-get autoremove and apt-get clean. Wouldn't it be nice if there were a single tool to take care of all that? Oh wait, there is! That tool is called uCareSystem. Let's install and use this one-stop-shop updater.

  • Ubuntu Server development summary – 31 July 2018

    The purpose of this communication is to provide a status update and highlights for any interesting subjects from the Ubuntu Server Team. If you would like to reach the server team, you can find us at the #ubuntu-server channel on Freenode. Alternatively, you can sign up and use the Ubuntu Server Team mailing list.

  • UK cyber security boffins dispense Ubuntu 18.04 wisdom

    The UK’s National Cyber Security Centre (NCSC) has dispensed advice aimed at securing Ubuntu installs and followed it up with help for Dixons customers.

    The NCSC, part of the UK’s Government Communications Headquarters (GCHQ) exists to make the UK a safer place to do business online and, in an unusual step for a Government agency, does a pretty good job of dispensing sensible security advice.

    Dixons Carphone customers got the treatment yesterday, following the admission that, er, maybe a bit more than 1.2 million users had actually had their privates exposed in a data breach. More like 10 million records. GCHQ's infosec crew suggested Dixons users shouldn't fill in their log-in info via that link on that unsolicited email, hmm?

    Last week, however, it was Ubuntu 18.04 LTS upon which the agency turned its gimlet gaze. The security wonks first stated the obvious – route data over a secure VPN to avoid prying eyes, stop users installing whatever they want and for goodness sake, cut down on the admin rights.

New Login Screen of Ubuntu 18.10 (Cosmic Cuttlefish)

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Ubuntu

A quick look at the upcoming Ubuntu 18.10 login screen via Yaru theme.

Ubuntu 18.10 (Cosmic Cuttlefish), the next major release of Ubuntu operating system which is currently in development. Among all the features, enhancements of Ubuntu 18.10, the main attractive feature is the look-n-feel. With 18.10 release, Ubuntu is bringing change to its default theme with a new theme called ‘Communitheme’ which is recently renamed as Yaru.

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The best way to update and install apps on Ubuntu

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Ubuntu

Ubuntu is a great Linux distribution that is soon to become even better. Already it's stable, secure, and user-friendly, so what's about to change? Recently I received an interesting question about Ubuntu. The question was about the best way to update and install apps on Ubuntu. That's where one major improvement is about to happen.

The thing that needs to be considered, for Ubuntu, is that they are migrating over to GNOME in 17.10, which means the now-defunct Ubuntu Software Center is officially switching to GNOME Software. This is a good thing on so many levels. First off, the Ubuntu Software Center has been broken for a long time. Also, with the old system, you had to install software from one tool and upgrade software from another. Now, thanks to the new GNOME Software tool, everything happens in one happy location.

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Xubuntu Development Update August 2018

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GNU
Linux
Ubuntu

This is the final point release for Xubuntu 16.04 “Xenial Xerus”. As Xubuntu has a 3-year support cycle, this release will be supported until April 2019. There have not been any major changes from the Xubuntu team for this point release, but there have been a number of other improvements and security updates for other components.

16.04.5 is expected to be released tomorrow, August 2, 2018. If you have a few moments, feel free to do some testing and make sure everything is working as well as we think it is!

Read more

Also: Snapcraft Build Environments

Ubuntu 16.04.5 LTS Release Candidate Ready for Testing Ahead of August 2 Release

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Ubuntu

Canonical's Lukasz Zemczak put out a call for testing today for the upcoming Ubuntu 16.04.5 LTS point release of the Ubuntu 16.04 LTS (Xenial Xerus) operating system series.

Release Candidate (RC) images of the Ubuntu 16.04.5 LTS point release, which is the fifth and also the last for the long-term supported Ubuntu 16.04 LTS (Xenial Xerus) operating system, are now ready for public testing. The Ubuntu community is urged to download and test drive the new RC images in case some unknown issues arise.

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Original: First set of 16.04.5 RC images ready for testing

Here's the New Login Screen of Ubuntu 18.10 (Cosmic Cuttlefish) with Yaru Theme

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Ubuntu

One of the most attractive things about the forthcoming Ubuntu 18.10 operating system, due for release later this fall on October 18, 2018, is its new look and feel, which is provided by the so-called Communitheme that was recently renamed as Yaru, a system-wide theme for Ubuntu Desktop.

As part of this community initiative, Ubuntu 18.10 will get a brand-new look and feel that will make the popular computer operating system more modern, more accessible, and more attractive. And, today we finally have a first look at the Yaru theme on the current Ubuntu 18.10 (Cosmic Cuttlefish) development release.

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More in Tux Machines

Kate/KTextEditor Picks Up Many Improvements To Enhance KDE Text Editing

Even with KDE's annual Akademy conference happening this past week in Vienna, KDE development has been going strong especially on the usability front. The Kate text editor and the KTextEditor component within KDE Frameworks 5 have been the largest benefactors of recent improvements. This KDE text editing code now has support for disabling syntax highlighting entirely if preferred. When using syntax highlighting, there have been many KTextEditor enhancements to improve the experience as well as improvements to the highlighting for a variety of languages from JavaScript to YAML to AppArmor files. Read more

KStars v2.9.8 released

KStars 2.9.8 is released for Windows, MacOS, and Linux. It is a hotfix release that contains bug fixes and stability improvements over the last release. Read more Also: KDE Itinerary - How did we get here?

today's leftovers and howtos

  • Project curl governance
    Over time, we've slowly been adjusting the curl project and its documentation so that we might at some point actually qualify to the CII open source Best Practices at silver level. We qualified at the base level a while ago as one of the first projects which did that. Recently, one of those issues we fixed was documenting the governance of the curl project. How exactly the curl project is run, what the key roles are and how decisions are made. That document is now in our git repo.
  • How to install OwnCloud 10 on CentOS 7 and RHEL 7
  • How to Get Google Camera Port for Asus ZenFone Max Pro M1
  • How to check your CentOS Version
  • 5 Practical Examples of chgrp command in Linux
  • Trinity Desktop R14.0.5 Brings Modern Compiler Support and Security Fixes
    Trinity Desktop, the Linux desktop environment which is forked from KDE 3, has just released an update bringing Trinity Desktop to version R14.0.5. Because Trinity Desktop is a “traditional desktop” based on KDE 3 and focuses on function rather than a lot of special effects, its benefits are typically things like increased battery life on laptops, and just overall efficiency for the user.
  • This week in Usability & Productivity, part 32
    I’m back from Akademy, and I can’t wait to share some of the cool stuff that happened there over the past week. I’m going to post the video of my talk as soon as it’s up. But first, I know what you’re all really waiting for: this week’s Usability & Productivity update. Though we were all quite busy, somehow everyone managed to accomplish an enormous amount of work, too!
  • Reminder: Shotwell Facebook publishing no longer working
    As announced earlier, since August 1st, 2018 Shotwell cannot publish to Facebook any more. The API that Shotwell used for that was removed and it is currently not clear to me how developers that do not use Android, iOS or Facebook’s web SDKs should provide similar functionality.
  • Gentoo on Integricloud
    Integricloud gave me access to their infrastructure to track some issues on ppc64 and ppc64le. Since some of the issues are related to the compilers, I obviously installed Gentoo on it and in the process I started to fix some issues with catalyst to get a working install media, but that’s for another blogpost. Today I’m just giving a walk-through on how to get a ppc64le (and ppc64 soon) VM up and running.
  • Industrial Mini-ITX board pumps up with Coffee Lake
    Commell’s “LV-67X” Mini-ITX board runs on 8th Gen “Coffee Lake” processors, with up to 32GB DDR4, 3x SATA, triple 4K displays, USB 3.1, and PCIe x16 and mini-PCIe expansion. The LV-67X, which shares some of the layout and feature set of its Intel Apollo Lake based LV-67U board, is the first industrial Mini-ITX board we’ve seen with Intel’s 8th Gen Coffee Lake CPUs. (Going forward, we’ll likely use the caffeinated nickname rather than “8th Gen” because Intel also applies the 8th Gen tag to the transitional and similarly 14nm Kaby Lake-G chips as well as the new, 10nm Cannon Lake processors.)
  • Unofficial OpenGApps for Android Pie 9.0 Released for ARM and ARM64 Platforms

Red Hat and Fedora News