Language Selection

English French German Italian Portuguese Spanish

Ubuntu

Linux For Beginners: Understanding The Many Versions Of Ubuntu

Filed under
Ubuntu

Maybe you've been considering ditching Windows for Linux (Microsoft has supplied plenty of reasons lately), or perhaps you just want to dip your toes into the world of fast, secure and open source operating systems to see what all the excitement is about. Either way, it's a good bet that Ubuntu has flown across your radar as you search the myriad distributions out there. It's one of the most popular Linux operating systems in the world due to its ease of use, pleasing interface and stability. It's the perfect gateway into Linux because of how user-friendly it is. But did you know there are seven different "flavors" of Ubuntu?*

Read more

Ubuntu Touch OTA-6 Update for Ubuntu Phones Slated for Release on December 7th

Filed under
Ubuntu

Coming only two months after the OTA-5 update, which finally rebased the mobile OS on the Ubuntu 16.04 LTS (Xenial Xerus) operating system series, the Ubuntu Touch OTA-6 release is expected to introduce more improvements like support for passwords that contain special characters for Nextcloud accounts.

The new Morph web browser received various improvements like support for restoring the previous browsing session at startup, ReCaptcha support, the ability to stop the media when closing a tab, themed scrollbars, better tabbed browsing experience, and support for web apps to access locally stored content on the device.

Read more

Ubuntu: Ubuntu Touch OTA-6, Ubuntu Weekly Newsletter, Ubuntu at KubeCon and CloudNativeCon, DeX and Xubuntu 18.10

Filed under
Ubuntu
  • Call for Testing: Ubuntu Touch OTA-6

    As I publish this, the OTA-6 update for Ubuntu Touch may have just entered the Release Candidate (rc) channel. It also may not have. It's our job to decide that over the next week.

    We have a set of 25 issues which were closed over the OTA-6 cycle. A summary of the changes can be found below, but for now I'd like to talk about our role in its release.

  • UBports' Ubuntu Touch OTA-6 Is On The Way With Browser Improvements, Oneplus One Fixes

    The UBports community is in the process of rolling out the release candidate for their next Ubuntu Touch Over The Air update.

    UBports' Ubuntu Touch OTA-6 is getting tidied up for entering the release candidate phase for interested testers while in early December the goal is to get the OTA-6 update officially released. In particular, their target for having Ubuntu Touch OTA-6 buttoned up is 7 December.

  • Ubuntu Weekly Newsletter Issue 555
  • Ubuntu at KubeCon & CloudNativeCon

    Held between December 10th – 13th at the Washington State Convention Center in Seattle, KubeCon and CloudNativeCon will be a great opportunity to meet and talk with the Ubuntu team here at Canonical.

    The Ubuntu team will be showcasing their work across Kubernetes and containers and highlighting what makes Ubuntu the platform of choice for developers.

  • Linux on DeX beta tested on the Samsung Galaxy S9

    Two weeks ago Samsung announced the final dates of the new Linux on DeX feature which would allow users to run Linux on Galaxy phones using DeX, their Continuum-like environment.

    The feature is still in beta and is under testing but the folks at XDA Developers managed to get their hands on the latest beta APK of DeX and have posted a review of the desktop environment running on the Samsung Galaxy S9.

  • Hands-on with Linux on Samsung DeX for the Samsung Galaxy Note 9
  • Xubuntu 18.10 overview | A operating system that combines elegance and ease of use.

    In this video, I am going to show an overview of Xubuntu 18.10 and some of the applications pre-installed.

Kubuntu 18.10 Cosmic Cuttlefish - Quite all right

Filed under
KDE
Ubuntu

Kubuntu 18.10 Cosmic Cuttlefish is a good distro. Not perfect, not amazing. But good. Better than I'd expect from an interim release, better than either Xubuntu or Ubuntu MATE. Fewer glitches, more solid results overall, with an odd bug here and there to spoil the overall experience. Smartphone glitches, network support and Discover remain the unpolished parts of this distro. The rest was rather solid.

But my comparison will always go back to Zesty, which was the ultimate Kubuntu distro EVAR. Now, after a while, I did get my 18.04 LTS on Slimbook working nicely, and several other test instances are behaving pretty well, and this Cosmic seems to be in the same group. It needs a bit of love before it will love you back, and the papercuts do leave a sore feeling on your fingers. However, so far this autumn, Kubuntu 18.10 is shaping up to be a cautiously fun choice. Grade 8/10. I'd suggest you take it for a spin. We're done.

Read more

23 Things To Do After Installing Ubuntu 18.04 LTS Bionic Beaver

Filed under
Ubuntu

Ubuntu 18.04 LTS Bionic Beaver shows promise being the latest LTS offering from Canonical after its initial release this year. So now, after installing the latest Ubuntu 18.04 LTS Bionic beaver version on your system, it’s time to set things up. Here is our top list of the important things that you should do after installing this open source OS.

Read more

Ubuntu, Canonical and Debian-based Purism Devices

Filed under
Debian
Ubuntu
  • Ubuntu Podcast from the UK LoCo: S11E37 – Thirty Seven: Essays On Life, Wisdom, And Masculinity

    This week we’ve been building a new home server using SnapRAID and upgrading a Thinkpad to Ubuntu 16.04. Samsung debut the beta of Linux on DeX, Wireframe Magazine is out, the Raspberry Pi 3 Model A+ is available, Ubuntu 18.04 will be supported for 10 years and we round up community news.

  • How to effortlessly modernise your cloud

    Companies across all industries have now adopted the cloud computing paradigm, with many leveraging OpenStack to manage private clouds. But what happens when first generation environments become obsolete, non-upgradeable and exposed to security vulnerabilities? The first option that you choose may not the the one that your businesses will always operate.

    Because these migration projects are driven by business demand, they must be completed quickly and with minimal interruptions. Businesses often fear the worst and prepare doomsday scenarios when migrating clouds with the worry of substantial downtime front of mind. Such concerns often lead to businesses annexing themselves from the significant benefits of cloud computing.

  • Give the Gift of Privacy with Purism’s Black Friday Deals

    2018 has been a rough year for digital privacy, but this is the home stretch. Many shoppers will be looking for retail therapy this holiday season, scanning retail shelves and storefronts across the Web. When the shopping’s over, and the presents are opened, what will you have given your friends and loved ones? Will you have saddled them with spying “smart home” appliances, mobile app trackers, and eavesdropping speakers?

Canonical on Privacy and Open Infrastructure Summit

Filed under
Ubuntu
  • Ubuntu, security & compliance

    Security, regulations and compliance are everyday issues for businesses, whether global or not.
    HIPAA, GDPR, MiFID II, and a whole host of other regulations, security and compliance demands are shaping the way businesses operate and the technologies that they can use.
    Although technological choices are not always able to completely solve particular regulatory or compliance hurdles, they are capable of easing the path to being a compliant business, say for PCI for example.
    In other cases, technology can provide peace of mind. Take GDPR, it has become one of the most hotly debated regulatory issues in recent history. GDPR has touched people of all walks of life, many of whom would never have thought it applicable to them. Many of those that hold GDPR responsibilities choose to run older versions of the Ubuntu operating system on their servers, with LTS and ESM, Ubuntu makes sure that those older versions are covered, while technologies such as Landscape can help ensure that there is no case for gross negligence under GDPR if you are hacked, because it will have ensured the latest patches are in place.
    For Ubuntu, helping our customers to be compliant, meet regulatory requirements, and helping them to be secure is built into everything that we do because we know that protecting your customers and avoiding the significant financial and reputational ramifications that threaten non-compliant organisations, is a must, and this starts with the technology powering your enterprise.

  •  

  • Goodbye OpenStack, hello Open Infrastructure Summit

    We have reached the end of an era, the end of the OpenStack Summit, but we’ve started a new era – the beginning of the Open Infrastructure Summit.
    Canonical has been with the OpenStack Summit since its inception, designing, building, operating and supporting OpenStack private clouds on Ubuntu. We understand the importance of certainty, stability, performance and economic efficiency for private cloud infrastructure and that has helped us to become the company that manage more OpenStack clouds for more different industries, more different architectures than any other company.
    We make sure that we support every single OpenStack release with upgrades because we know that what matters isn’t just day 2, it’s every day, living with OpenStack, scaling it, upgrading it, growing it, that is important to master in order to really get value for your business.

Canonical/Ubuntu: Apellix, Ubuntu Appreciation Day, One Mix 2S Yoga and Xubuntu Development

Filed under
Ubuntu
  • Behind the drone: how aerial robotics solve industrial IOT challenges

    Apellix, an emerging leader in the field of aerial robotics, are creating innovative industrial solutions with the help of Ubuntu.

    The development of aerial robotic systems to carry out tasks at height has taken the responsibility of dangerous activity away from human workers. With 150 workers dying everyday in the USA as a result of hazardous working conditions, there is a clear need for improved occupational safety practices. Of these deaths, 849 came as a result of falling whilst on the job, a figure that Apellix endeavours to reduce. Not only are the benefits significant from a workplace safety perspective, Apellix systems provide a cost-effective and time saving solution to such tasks.

    None of this however, would be possible without software. Software is allowing the industrial world to move from analog to digital and Apellix aerial robotic systems are at the forefront of innovation.

    Ubuntu enables Apellix’s aerial robotics to conduct autonomous flights without the assistance of human navigation, eliminating the risk of human error or danger which can occur with pilot operated drones. To achieve this, each aerial robot is fitted with several sensors which are constantly processing data through an Ubuntu server. The data, once processed is then sent to the autopilot electronics systems to precisely locate and control the drone in a 3D space.

  • Costales: Ubuntu Community Appreciation Day: Thanks Rudy (~cm-t)!

    Today is the Ubuntu Appreciation Day in which we share our thanks to people in our community for making Ubuntu great.

    This year, I want to thank you to Rudy (~cm-t)! Why? Because IMHO he is an incredible activist, helpful, funny, always with a smile. He prints passion in everything related to Ubuntu. A perfect example for everyone!

  • One Mix 2S Yoga mini laptop running Ubuntu 18.04

    If you are interested in learning more about running the latest Ubuntu 18.04 Linux operating system on the new One Mix 2S Yoga mini laptop. You’ll be pleased to know that Brad Linder from the Liliputing website has created an in-depth run-through complete with video revealing what you can expect from the operating system and performance of the mini laptop.

  • Hitting a Break Point

    I am seeking support to be able to undertake freelance work. The first project would be to finally close out the Outernet/Othernet research work to get it submitted. Beyond that there would be technical writing as well as making creative works. Some of that would involve creating “digital library” collections but also helping others create print works instead.

    Who could I help/serve? Unfortunately we have plenty of small, underfunded groups in my town. The American Red Cross no longer maintains a local office and the Salvation Army has no staff presence locally. Our county-owned airport verges on financial collapse and multiple units of government have difficulty staying solvent. There are plenty of needs to cover as long as someone had independent financial backing.

    Besides, I owe some edits of Xubuntu documentation too.

    It isn’t like “going on disability” as it is called in American parlance is immediate let alone simple. One of two sets of paperwork has to eventually go into a cave in Pennsylvania for centralized processing. I wish I were kidding but that cave is located near Slippery Rock. Both processes are backlogged only 12-18 months at last report. For making a change in the short term, that doesn’t even exist as an option on the table.

    That’s why I’m asking for support. I’ve grown tired of spending multiple days at work depressed. Showing physical symptoms of depression in the workplace isn’t good either especially when it results in me missing work. When you can’t help people who are in the throes of despair frequently by their own fault, how much more futile can it get?

How To Check CPU Temperature in Ubuntu

Filed under
Ubuntu

This quick tutorial shows you how to check CPU temperature in Ubuntu and other Linux distributions with a help of a tool called Psensor.
Read more

Ubuntu: One Mix 2S Yoga, Mir, Ubuntu Weekly Newsletter and More

Filed under
Ubuntu
  • Running Ubuntu 18.04 on the One Mix 2S Yoga mini laptop

    The One Netbook One Mix 2S Yoga looks nearly identical to its predecessor, the One Mix Yoga. But the new model supports USB Type-C charging, has a fingerprint sensor, and sports a much faster processor and speedier storage — and the upgrades result in significantly better performance.

    It turns out that’s not the only thing that’s different — the new model also has slightly better out-of-the-box support for Ubuntu 18.04 Linux.

  • egmde: a project that uses Mir

    Display servers solve a large and complex problem. Mir provides a broad and powerful library to solve those problems, but there is a learning curve to use Mir effectively. It is really helpful to have a step-by-step example that covers enough of the issues to get a decent start.
    To address this need there’s a set of blog posts based around the development of “egmde” [Example Mir Desktop Environment]: a very simple shell that can either form the basis of further development or provide a platform for experimentation. Note that egmde is not a complete desktop: the tutorials (and the code in egmde) don’t cover aspects of a desktop environment that are not related to using Mir. Missing functionality includes: integrating into the system for screen locking & suspend, policy kit integration, internationalization, etc.

  • Ubuntu Weekly Newsletter Issue 554
  • Ubuntu 18.04 Gets 10 Year Lifespan Ahead of Canonical IPO

    At a keynote in Berlin, Canonical's founder Mark Shuttleworth said that Ubuntu 18.04 LTS is getting a 10 year support period, which is 5 years longer than normal. This extension is specifically aimed at the IoT, financial services and telecommunications market, where products will often operate for many years without significant changes. He also reiterated "Canonical's promise to easily enable OpenStack customers to migrate from one version of OpenStack to another," and promised to support versions of OpenStack from 2014 and on. Interestingly, these promises come ahead of Canonical's planned IPO in 2019. Mark seems to think that Ubuntu is a real competitor with Red Hat now, which IBM just recently acquired, and he's quite enthusiastic about the future of Ubuntu. The full Canonical keynote can be seen on Ubuntu's blog here. Thanks to dgz for the tip.

  • Development Setup: Ubuntu MATE 19.04 + Ayatana Indicators

    This is a quick HowTo that shows how to setup a Ubuntu MATE 19.04 development setup in which Ubuntu System Indicators [1] get replaced by Ayatana System Indicators [1].

    The current development strategy is to use nightly DEB packages provided by the Arctica Project and Ayatana Indicators upstream on top of Ubuntu MATE 19.04 and see what details still require work.

Syndicate content

More in Tux Machines

Games: Metropolisim, Monster Prom, Kingdom Two Crowns and Lots More

  • Metropolisim aims to be the deepest city-building simulation experience ever, will have Linux support
    Metropolisim from developer Halfway Decent Games is releasing next year, with a pretty bold aim to be the deepest city-building simulation experience ever.
  • Monster Prom, the dating sim that won me over is now available on GOG
    Visual novels and dating sims aren't something I'm usually into, however Monster Prom is actually funny and worth playing and it's now available on GOG. I know we have a number of GOG fans here, so hopefully this will be interesting for you. As always, we try to treat all stores equally with release info.
  • Kingdom Two Crowns will be coming to Linux after all with the Quality of Life update
    Kingdom Two Crowns, the third in the Kingdom series released recently for Windows and Mac. It looked like we weren't getting it, but it's now confirmed to be coming. In their new roadmap post on Reddit and Steam, under the "QoL #01 Update" (Quality of Life Update) they noted that they will add "Add SteamOS (Linux) Support". This update is due out sometime early next year. This is really nice news, it's good to know they didn't give up on supporting Linux after all.
  • Steam Link for the Raspberry Pi is now officially available
    After a rather short beta period, the Steam Link application for the Raspberry Pi is now officially out.
  • Valve in it for the 'long haul' with Artifact, first update out and a progression system due soon
    Artifact, the big new card game from Valve isn't doing so well but Valve won't be giving up any time soon. The first major update is out, with a progression system due soon. At release, it had around sixty thousand people playing and that very quickly dropped down hard. Harder than I expected, a lot worse than Valve probably thought it would too.
  • Bearded Giant Games open their own store with a 'Linux First Initiative'
    Bearded Giant Games, developer of Ebony Spire Heresy have announced their new online store along with a 'Linux First Initiative'. I know what you're thinking already "not another store", but fear not. For now, it's mainly going to be a place for them to sell their games directly. Speaking about it in a blog post, they mentioned how they hate having to check over multiple forums, channels, emails and so on to stay up to date and they wish "to spend more time giving love to my projects instead of updating 4 different distribution channels, translating pages, writing different press releases and making separate builds"—can't argue against that.
  • The Forgotten Sanctum, the final DLC for Pillars of Eternity II is out along with a patch
    Pillars of Eternity II: Deadfire expansions come to a close with the release of The Forgotten Sanctum along with a major update now out.
  • Pre-order Meeple Station for instant beta access, what the developers say is like Rimworld in space
    Meeple Station, the space station building sim that the developers say is like Rimworld in space can now be pre-ordered with instant beta access. While we don't like the idea of pre-orders, getting access to the beta right away is a decent way to do it. Sadly, their Kickstarter campaign actually failed which I didn't notice. Making sure that wasn't the end of it, the developer Vox Games decided to go the Early Access route. They weren't left out in the cold of space though, as they also recently announced that Indie DB will be publishing their game. Under the label of Modularity, this will be the first title published by Indie DB.
  • Heroes of Newerth drops support for Linux and Mac
    Heroes of Newerth, the MOBA originally from S2 Games which is now handled by Frostburn Studios has dropped Linux and Mac support. [...] I'll be honest here, I couldn't care less about it personally. The last time i tried it, it was the single most toxic experience I've ever had in an online game. I've played a lot of online games and even so it was still at a level I had not seen before. I tried to go back to it a few times, never with a happy ending. Still, sad for any remaining Linux (and Mac) fans of the game. Looking over some statistics, it's not popular with viewers either. Around 180 on Twitch compared with nearly 100K for League of Legends and over 50K for Dota 2.
  • Unity 2018.3 With HDR Render Pipeline Preview, Updated PhysX & More
    Unity Tech is ending out the year with their Unity 2018.3 game engine update that brings a number of new features and improvements to its many supported platforms.

Wine 4.0 Release Candidate 2

  • Wine Announcement
    The Wine development release 4.0-rc2 is now available. What's new in this release (see below for details): - Bug fixes only, we are in code freeze.
  • Just when you think you can stop drinking, Wine 4.0 has another release candidate available
    Just before the weekend hits you in the face like a bad hangover when you realise it's Monday already, there's another bottle of Wine ready for you. Of course, we're not talking about the tasty liquid! Put down the glass, it's the other kind of Wine. The one used to run your fancy Windows programs and games on Linux. Doing their usual thing, developer Alexandre Julliard announced that the Wine 4.0 Release Candidate 2 is officially out the door today. While this release is nothing spectacular it is an important one, the more bugs they're able to tick off the list the better the 4.0 release will be for more people to use it.

Android Leftovers

A Look At The Clear Linux Performance Over The Course Of 2018

With the end of the year quickly approaching, it's time for our annual look at how the Linux performance has evolved over the past year from graphics drivers to distributions. This year was a particularly volatile year for Linux performance due to Spectre and Meltdown mitigations, some of which have at least partially recovered thanks to continued optimizations landing in subsequent kernel releases. But on the plus side, new releases of Python, PHP, GCC 8, and other new software releases have helped out the performance. For kicking off our year-end benchmark comparisons, first up is a look at how Intel's performance-optimized Clear Linux distribution evolved this year. For getting a look at the performance, on four different systems (two Xeon boxes, a Core i5, and Core i7 systems), the performance was compared from Clear Linux at the end of 2017 to the current rolling-release state as of this week. Read more