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Ubuntu

Canonical and Ubuntu

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Ubuntu
  • RADV & ANV Vulkan Drivers Are One Command Away On Ubuntu 17.04

    Similar to Ubuntu 16.10, the Mesa Vulkan drivers are not present by default on new Ubuntu installations. But to get the packaged Vulkan drivers, simply sudo apt install mesa-vulkan-drivers. When running some tests on Ubuntu 17.04 this weekend, I was a bit surprised to see that Mesa's Intel ANV and Radeon RADV drivers aren't present by default -- since it's been one year since the Vulkan 1.0 debut and the ANV/RADV drivers have matured a lot during this time. There's also more and more software becoming available that can make use of Vulkan while personally wishing for more Linux desktops to push Vulkan. But it's easy to install the Vulkan drivers as mentioned. Similarly, vulkan-utils isn't installed by default.

  • Wishful Thinking Of Non-Free Software Makers

    Regardless of my personal problems with non-Free software, the world has largely accepted FLOSS to SAS’s chagrin. I guess Canonical should be glad except they barely mention “Linux” on their site. What’s with that? They are like some purveyors of non-Free software that talk about the benefits of their products without even mentioning what the software actually does as if that’s best kept secret…

  • 2017: Should Linux Benchmarking Still Be Mostly Done With Ubuntu?

    Every year or so it comes up how some users believe that at Phoronix we should be benchmarking with Antergos/Arch, Debian, or [insert here any other distribution] instead of mostly using Ubuntu for our Linux benchmarking. That discussion has come back up in recent days.

    In our forums and Twitter the past few days, that discussion seems to have come up by some users requesting I use a different Linux distribution than Ubuntu as the main test platform for all of our benchmarking. As I've said before, Ubuntu is used given it's the most popular when it comes to Linux desktop usage as well as significant usage of it on servers / workstations / cloud. But I have no tie to it beyond focusing upon using the Linux distribution that's used by the most folks for obtaining the maximum relevance to users, gamers, and enthusiasts reading said articles. And for allowing easy comparisons / out-of-the-box expectations. On my main production system I still use Fedora Workstation as my personal favorite and in the basement server room there are a variety of operating systems -- both BSDs and Linux and from Antergos to openSUSE and Debian.

Canonical Releases Snapcraft 2.28 Snap Creator Tool with over 50 Improvements

Filed under
Ubuntu

Canonical released today Snapcraft 2.28, a new maintenance update to the tool application developers can use to package their apps as Snaps for Ubuntu Linux and other distros that support the Snappy technologies.

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netOS Server 10.65.1 Released, Based on Ubuntu 16.04 LTS and Xfce 4.12 Desktop

Filed under
OS
Ubuntu

Black Lab Software CEO Roberto J. Dohnert is informing Softpedia today about the release and general availability of the netOS Server 10.65.1 server-oriented and open-source operating system.

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Ubuntu GNOME 17.04 Final Beta Features GNOME 3.24 with Night Light, Flatpak 0.8

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GNOME
Ubuntu

As part of yesterday's Ubuntu 17.04 Final Beta release, the Ubuntu GNOME 17.04 operating system got its second Beta milestone bringing with it the latest development version of the recently released GNOME 3.24 desktop environment.

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Also: Kubuntu 17.04 Beta 2 Includes KDE Plasma 5.9 Desktop, KDE Applications 16.12.3

Ubuntu Budgie 17.04 Beta 2 Brings Latest GNOME 3.24 Apps, Budgie 10.2.9 Desktop

Early Look at Ubuntu 17.04

Filed under
Ubuntu
  • Trying Out Unity 8 + Mir On Ubuntu 17.04

    With Ubuntu 17.04, Unity 7 with the X.Org Server remains the default desktop environment, but Unity 8 and Mir can be found on the default ISO and it's just a matter of logging out and into the experimental Unity 8 session. It's really easy to try out for those interested. For my tests today I was using an Intel Xeon box with a Radeon RX 470 graphics card atop Ubuntu 17.04's default Mesa packages and kernel. Overall it was an interesting experience and while a lot of bugs remain, the Unity 8 experience was much better than the last time I tried it a few months ago and is almost up to being usable for a daily Linux desktop.

  • The Ubuntu 17.04 Beta Is Now Available to Download
  • They’re Here: Ubuntu 17.04 Beta 2 Flavours Available to Download
  • Ubuntu Linux 17.04 'Zesty Zapus' Final Beta now available for download in multiple DE flavors

    When someone is interested in trying a Linux-based desktop operating system for the first time, they often choose Ubuntu. This is a smart choice, as it is easy to use, well supported, and quite beautiful. Even if you don't like the Unity desktop environment, there are several other DEs, or flavors, from which to choose -- GNOME, KDE, and Xfce to name a few.

    Today, the Final Beta of Ubuntu 17.04 'Zesty Zapus' becomes available for download. While it is never a good idea to run pre-release software on production machines, Canonical is claiming that it should be largely bug free at this point. In other words, if you understand the risks, it should be fairly safe. Home users aside, this is a good opportunity for administrators to conduct testing prior to the official release next month.

Ubuntu MATE 17.04 Final Beta Is Out with MATE 1.18, Drops 32-bit PowerPC Support

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Ubuntu

Ubuntu MATE leader Martin Wimpress is informing Softpedia today about the immediate availability of the Final Beta release of the upcoming Ubuntu MATE 17.04 (Zesty Zapus) operating system, due for release on April 13, 2017.

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Also: Ubuntu 17.04 Final Beta Released

Ubuntu 17.04 (Zesty Zapus) Final Beta Released with Linux Kernel 4.10, Mesa 17.0

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Ubuntu

Canonical released today, as expected, the Final Beta of the upcoming Ubuntu 17.04 (Zesty Zapus) operating system, due for release on April 13, 2017, along with the rest of the opt-in flavors, such as Kubuntu, Xubuntu, Lubuntu, Ubuntu GNOME, etc.

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Has Interest in Ubuntu Peaked?

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Ubuntu

This graph represents Google search volume for Ubuntu (the OS) from 2004 until now, 2017.

Looking at the image it us hard to not conclude one thing: that interest in Ubuntu has peaked.

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Also: Ubuntu splats TITSUP bug spread in update

Ubuntu Server: The smart person's guide

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Ubuntu

Ubuntu Server is an open source platform that does more than you might think. With its ability to serve as an internal company server or to scale all the way up and out to meet enterprise-level needs, this operating system can do it all.

This smart person's guide is an easy way to get up to speed on Ubuntu Server. We'll update this guide periodically when news and updates about Ubuntu Server are released.

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Why you might want to skip Ubuntu 17.04

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Ubuntu

Linux users have one thing that often sets them apart from their Windows and Mac-using colleagues: They often spend a lot more time fixing things or finding out how to fix things. While this is great for hobbyists and enthusiasts, it’s not great for productivity. For people who need to get stuff done on their laptops and desktops, stability will often take precedence over new features.

Every two years, Canonical offers up a long-term support (LTS) version of the Ubuntu Linux distribution. This year (2017) is an odd year, meaning that while there will be a new version of Ubuntu coming in April, not everyone will want to upgrade. And that’s A-OK.

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Also: Ubuntu Core ported to NXP quad-core ARM Cortex-A53 SoC

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More in Tux Machines

Debian News: Debian 9 'Stretch' Slideshow, HyperThreading, and Voyager 9

today's howtos

Servers: Docker Hub, Internet Archive, DevOps...

  • Building Images with Dockerfile and Docker Hub
    In this series previewing the self-paced Containers for Developers and Quality Assurance (LFS254) training course from The Linux Foundation, we’ve covered installing Docker, introduced Docker Machine, and some basic commands for performing Docker container and image operations. In the three sample videos below, we’ll take a look at Dockerfiles and Docker Hub. Docker can build an image by reading the build instructions from a file that’s generally referred to as Dockerfile. So, first, check your connectivity with the “dockerhost” and then create a folder called nginx. In that folder, we have created a file called dockerfile and in the dockerfile, we have used different instructions, like FROM, RUN, EXPOSE, and CMD.
  • What can developers learn from being on call?
    We often talk about being on call as being a bad thing. For example, the night before I wrote this my phone woke me up in the middle of the night because something went wrong on a computer. That’s no fun! I was grumpy. In this post, though, we’re going to talk about what you can learn from being on call and how it can make you a better software engineer!. And to learn from being on call you don’t necessarily need to get woken up in the middle of the night. By “being on call”, here, I mean “being responsible for your code when it breaks”. It could mean waking up to issues that happened overnight and needing to fix them during your workday!
  • Making the Internet Archive’s full text search faster.
    The Internet Archive is a nonprofit digital library based in San Francisco. It provides free public access to collections of digitized materials, including websites, books, documents, papers, newspapers, music, video and software. This article describes how we made the full-text organic search faster — without scaling horizontally — allowing our users to search in just a few seconds across our collection of 35 million documents containing books, magazine, newspapers, scientific papers, patents and much more.
  • DevOps: More Than Automation
    Type “devops” into any job search site today and the overwhelming majority of results will be for some variation of “DevOps Engineer”. The skills required will centre on tools like Puppet/Chef/Ansible, AWS/Azure, scripting in Python/Perl/Bash/PowerShell etc. Essentially, they’ve taken a deployment automation engineer role, crossed out “deployment automation” and written “DevOps” in its place.

How Linux and makerspaces can strengthen our social fabric

In recent years, we've seen the rise of makerspaces, a new social invention where people with shared interests, especially in STEAM (science, technology, engineering, art, and math), gather to work on projects and share ideas. I was intrigued when I learned about a makerspace in my community, because I had never heard of such a concept before. I've since learned that makerspaces offer so much more than just a place to learn and build. A well-run makerspace also knits together a community and its social fabric—and, most importantly, invites in people who might otherwise be marginalized. Read more