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Ubuntu

Ubuntu: Nimbusoft, SnapRoute, Artful Aardvark, Kubernetes

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Ubuntu
  • Meet the Laptops & Desktop PCs Being Sold with Ubuntu Budgie

    UK-based computer outfit Nimbusoft is gearing up to sell two laptops and an all-in-one desktop PC pre-loaded with the aforementioned nimble, GNOME-based Ubuntu spin.

    Product pages for these “Ubuntu Budgie Edition” devices are live over on the Nimbusoft website, although neither the company or the Ubuntu Budgie project itself has made an announcement about the partnership.

  • SnapRoute Integrates its FlexSwitch with Canonical’s Ubuntu

    SnapRoute and Canonical joined forces to create an integrated software stack for white-box switch deployments. They’re combining SnapRoute’s FlexSwitch and Canonical’s Ubuntu operating system for cloud environments.

    The FlexSwitch+Ubuntu stack is certified on multiple white-box switches including the Facebook Wedge 100, according to the partners.

  • Ubuntu 17.10 Shifts To Linux 4.12, Linux 4.13 Still In Testing

    The Ubuntu 17.10 Artful Aardvark has finally moved past the Linux 4.11 kernel and now has a 4.12-based kernel in its main archive.

  • Canonical announces further enterprise Kubernetes support options

    Canonical continues to push forward with its Kubernetes container DevOps management plans. In its latest move, Ubuntu Linux's parent company announced two consulting packages for enterprise Kubernetes deployments. In addition, it's offering expanded enterprise support with partners. This will include Galactic Fog's serverless infrastructure, Rancher's container management workflow, and Weaveworks' Weave Cloud.

    This comes as Canonical prepares for an initial public offering (IPO). These moves are both to gain new cloud and container customers and to show that Canonical is laser-focused on the enterprise market. Earlier, Canonical had tried, and failed, to dominate the Linux desktop and become a smartphone leader.

Kubuntu and Ubuntu Leftovers

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Ubuntu
  • Help needed testing newest bugfix release of Plasma on Kubuntu 17.04

    Are you using Kubuntu 17.04, our current release? Help us test a new bugfix release for KDE Plasma! Go here for more details: https://wiki.ubuntu.com/Testing/EnableProposed.

    Unfortunately that page illustrates Xenial and Ubuntu Unity rather than Zesty in Kubuntu. Using Discover or Muon, use Settings > More, enter your password, and ensure that Pre-release updates (zesty-proposed) is ticked in the Updates tab.

  • Ubuntu Sees Sense, Will Support Indicator Applets in Ubuntu 17.10

    Ubuntu 17.10 will have GNOME Shell indicator applet support by default. Hurrah for sanity! The results of the GNOME desktop user survey made it crystal clear that, alongside a visible desktop dock, Ubuntu uses want legacy system tray icons to sit in the GNOME Shell top bar, alongside the main system menu.

  • Ubuntu Weekly Newsletter Issue 517

    Welcome to the Ubuntu Weekly Newsletter. This is issue #517 for the week of August 15 – 21, 2017, and the full version is available here.

Didier Roche: Ubuntu GNOME Shell in Artful: Day 7

Filed under
GNOME
Ubuntu

Today’s change will be about one of our last transformation (non visual but in term of feature) on our journey on transforming the default session in Ubuntu Artful. For more background on this, you can refer back to our decisions regarding our default session experience as discussed in my blog post.

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Debian and Ubuntu Leftovers

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Debian
Ubuntu

Ubuntu: Bare Metal Kubernetes, Numix Square Icons, Imported Repositories

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Ubuntu

Debian, Ubuntu, and Black Lab

Filed under
Debian
Ubuntu
  • Debian Policy call for participation -- August 2017

    At the Debian Policy BoF at DebConf17, Solveig suggested that we could post summaries of recent activity in policy bugs to Planet Debian, as a kind of call for participation. Russ Allbery had written a script to generate such a summary some time ago, but it couldn’t handle the usertags the policy team uses to progress bugs through the policy changes process. Today I enhanced the script to handle usertags and I’m pleased to be able to post a summary of our bugs.

  • LXD: Weekly status #11
  • Black Lab Enterprise Linux 11.0.3 Ubuntu-based operating system now available

    The perfect Linux distribution doesn't exist. Take it from someone that does a lot of distro-hopping -- you will find yourself searching forever. Instead, it is wise to find a Linux-based operating system that meets your needs and try to stick with it. After all, constantly fiddling with various distributions will just drain your energy and steal your time.

    With that said, Black Lab Enterprise Linux 11.0.3 is now available. Should you download it? Well, if you are not satisfied with your current Linux-based operating system, then maybe. I've got to tell you, this Ubuntu-based distro looks like a winner. It features modern versions of both Google Chrome and the Linux kernel, plus it offers support for many file systems. Despite being designed for organizations, it should serve as a great desktop OS for home users too.

  • Black Lab Enterprise Linux 11.0.3 Brings Linux 4.10, Based on Ubuntu 16.04.3 LTS

    Black Lab Software's CEO Robert Dohnert informs Softpedia today on the immediate availability for download of what it would appear to be the third maintenance update to the Black Lab Enterprise Linux 11 operating system series.

    Based on the recently released Ubuntu 16.04.3 LTS (Xenial Xerus) operating system, Black Lab Enterprise Linux 11.0.3 uses its HWE (Hardware Enablement) Linux 4.10.0-37 kernel and comes with up-to-date components, including LibreOffice 5.4, Google Chrome 60, Mozilla Thunderbird 52.3, Webmin 1.8, and Samba 4, as well as all the latest security patches from upstream.

Voyager 16.04.3 Linux Distro Launches Officially Based on Ubuntu 16.04.3 LTS

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GNU
Linux
Ubuntu

The French developer behind the Ubuntu-based Voyager GNU/Linux distribution had the please of announcing this past weekend the release of Voyager 16.04.3, a completely redesigned Xubuntu 16.04.3 LTS distro built on top of the Xfce desktop environment.

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Didier Roche: Ubuntu GNOME Shell in Artful: Day 6

Filed under
GNOME
Ubuntu

Today’s change is hopefully an unnoticeale change for most of you, but gives better security, a smoother and great experience on our journey on transforming the default session in Ubuntu Artful. For more background on this, you can refer back to our decisions regarding our default session experience as discussed in my blog post.

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Linux Mint vs Ubuntu: Detailed Comparison

Filed under
Linux
Ubuntu

If you’re looking for a new Linux distro for your desktop, then you must have stumbled upon Linux Mint and Ubuntu. They are the two most popular desktop Linux distros.

Both Linux Mint and Ubuntu have several editions (flavors) to choose from, so we’ll have them in mind while doing this comparison.

This comparison doesn’t really have anything to do with servers or web hosting, but it’s what our readers want to read the most, so we’ll keep these kinds of articles coming.

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Black Lab Enterprise Linux 11.0.3 released

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GNU
Linux
Ubuntu

Today we are pleased to announce the release of Black Lab Enterprise Linux 11.0.3 for general availability.

Black Lab Enterprise Linux 11.0.3 is targeted to small to medium sized businesses and is used in production environments around the world ranging from businesses, education facilities, research laboratories, and multimedia production facilities.

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Also: Snap Apps To Get Big Promo Push in Ubuntu Software

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More in Tux Machines

Software: VirtualBox, TeX Live Cockpit, Mailspring, Qt, Projects, and Maintainers

  • VirtualBox 5.2.2 Brings Linux 4.14 Fixes, HiDPI UI Improvements
    The Oracle developers behind VM VirtualBox have released a new maintenance build in the VirtualBox 5.2 series that is a bit more exciting than their usual point releases.
  • TeX Live Cockpit
    I have been working quite some time on a new front end for the TeX Live Manager tlmgr. Early versions have leaked into TeX Live, but the last month or two has seen many changes in tlmgr itself, in particular support for JSON output. These changes were mostly driven by the need (or ease) of the new frontend: TLCockpit.
  • Mailspring – A New Open Source Cross-Platform Email Client
    Mailspring is a fork of the now discontinued Nylas Mail client. It does, however, offer a much better performance, and is built with a native C++ sync engine instead of JavaScript. According to the development team, the company is sunsetting further development of Mailspring. Mailspring offers virtually all the best features housed in Nylas Mail, and thanks to its native C++ sync engine it uses fewer dependencies which results in less lag and a reduction in RAM usage by 50% compared to Nylas Mail.
  • Removing Qt 4 from Debian testing (aka Buster): some statistics
    We started filing bugs around September 9. That means roughly 11 weeks, which gives us around 8 packages fixed a week, aka 1.14 packages per day. Not bad at all!
  • Products Over Projects
    However, projects are not the only way of funding and organizing software development. For instance, many companies that sell software as a product or a service do not fund or organize their core product/platform development in the form of projects. Instead, they run product development and support using near-permanent teams for as long as the product is sold in the market. The budget may vary year on year but it is generally sufficient to fund a durable, core development organization continuously for the life of the product. Teams are funded to work on a particular business problem or offering over a period of time; with the nature work being defined by a business problem to address rather than a set of functions to deliver. We call this way of working as “product-mode” and assert that it is not necessary to be building a software product in order to fund and organize software development like this.
  • Why we never thank open source maintainers

    It is true that some of you guys can build a tool in a hackathon, but maintaining a project is a lot more difficult than building a project. Most of the time they are not writing code, but [...]

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Tizen News

Mozilla Firefox Quantum

  • Can the new Firefox Quantum regain its web browser market share?
    When Firefox was introduced in 2004, it was designed to be a lean and optimized web browser, based on the bloated code from the Mozilla Suite. Between 2004 and 2009, many considered Firefox to be the best web browser, since it was faster, more secure, offered tabbed browsing and was more customizable through extensions than Microsoft’s Internet Explorer. When Chrome was introduced in 2008, it took many of Firefox’s best ideas and improved on them. Since 2010, Chrome has eaten away at Firefox’s market share, relegating Firefox to a tiny niche of free software enthusiasts and tinkerers who like the customization of its XUL extensions. According to StatCounter, Firefox’s market share of web browsers has fallen from 31.8% in December 2009 to just 6.1% today. Firefox can take comfort in the fact that it is now virtually tied with its former arch-nemesis, Internet Explorer and its variants. All of Microsoft’s browsers only account for 6.2% of current web browsing according to StatCounter. Microsoft has largely been replaced by Google, whose web browsers now controls 56.5% of the market. Even worse, is the fact that the WebKit engine used by Google now represents over 83% of web browsing, so web sites are increasingly focusing on compatibility with just one web engine. While Google and Apple are more supportive of W3C and open standards than Microsoft was in the late 90s, the web is increasingly being monopolized by one web engine and two companies, whose business models are not always based on the best interests of users or their rights.
  • Firefox Nightly Adds CSD Option
    I’ve said it before and I’ll say it again: Firefox 57 is awesome — so awesome that I’m finally using it as my default browser again. But there is one thing it the Linux version of Firefox sorely needs: client-side decoration.