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Ubuntu

Ubuntu MATE 16.10 In Development, Software Boutique and Welcome Get New Features

Filed under
Ubuntu

Ubuntu MATE lead developer and maintainer Martin Wimpress announced earlier today, May 24, 2016, that the Ubuntu MATE 16.10 operating system is now open for development.

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Watch: Ubuntu Convergence in Action on Meizu PRO 5 Ubuntu Edition with Miracast

Filed under
Ubuntu

Earlier today, May 23, 2016, the Ubuntu Community Manager at Canonical, Mr. Alan Pope, received his Meizu PRO 5 Ubuntu Edition smartphone, so he immediately ran some tests to see the Ubuntu convergence with his own eyes.

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Quortus selected in joint Lime, Ubuntu wireless network development

Filed under
Ubuntu

Quortus and Lime Micro today announce that the Quortus EdgeCentrix (ECX) technology has been selected as part of a fully programmable mobile network capability launched last month by Lime Micro. The new network capability, itself a collaboration between Lime and Canonical, two of the UK’s leading open source technology innovators, will dramatically change the way mobile networks are built in the future.

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Leftovers: Ubuntu and Debian

Filed under
Debian
Ubuntu
  • Reproducible builds: week 56 in Stretch cycle
  • Adopting pristine-tar

    As of yesterday, I am the new maintainer of pristine-tar. As it is the case for most of Joey Hess’ creations, it is an extremely useful tool, and used in a very large number of Debian packages which are maintained in git.

    My first upload was most of a terrain recognition nature: I did some housekeeping tasks, such as making the build idempotent and making sure all binaries are built with security hardening flags, and wrote a few automated test cases to serve as build-time and run-time regression test suite. No functional changes have been made.

  • No Audio in Lubuntu? - Lubuntu Audio Configuration and Volume Control
  • Vulkan Support Might Be Implemented in Ubuntu Linux's Mir Display Server Soon

    As many of you might already know, Canonical is working hard these days on pushing the Unity 8 user interface and its convergence vision to the Ubuntu desktop.

    Unity 8 is the next-generation Unity desktop environment for the popular GNU/Linux operating system, Ubuntu Linux, and Canonical founder Mark Shuttleworth promised earlier this month that it would be available, installed by default, in the upcoming Ubuntu 16.10 (Yakkety Yak) release.

    Installed by default does not mean enabled by default, as Unity 7 will remain the main desktop environment for Ubuntu 16.10, which should see the light of day later this year, on October 20, 2016. And, of course, the new Unity 8 interface will be ready for use, without the need for users to install any special packages.

Why Linus Torvalds Doesn’t Like Using Debian Or Ubuntu Linux?

Filed under
GNU
Linux
Red Hat
Debian
Ubuntu

From the past 25 years, Linus Torvalds is working tirelessly to make Linux a more efficient and user-friendly computing platform. His creation is now available to the open source lovers in the form of many Linux distros that serve a wide variety of users.

Linux and open source software support the idea of choice and it acts as their driving force. However, with time, the internet is filled with tons of Linux distros based on Debian and Ubuntu-like feature

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Raspberry Pi-based signage stack gets Snappy

Filed under
Linux
Ubuntu

The Screenly signage software for the Raspberry Pi is being converted to Ubuntu Snappy Core, enabling OTA updates and transactional rollbacks.

Canonical and Screenly, which makes what it calls “the most popular digital signage solution for the Raspberry Pi,” have announced a partnership to build the Screenly signage stack on Ubuntu Snappy Core. Screenly, which is currently available in commercial (Pro) and free, open source “OSE” versions based on Raspbian Linux, is adopting the lightweight, transaction-oriented Ubuntu Core “to give its customers a stable platform that is secure, robust, simple to use and manage,” says Screenly.

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Leftovers: Devuan and Ubuntu

Filed under
Debian
Ubuntu
  • Debian Fork Devuan Beta Released

    A team of developers made good on their threats to fork Debian Linux late last year, after the community’s leadership voted to replace sysvinit with systemd, making systemd the default init boot process.

  • A Telegram Snap Package Is Available on Ubuntu 16.04

    Using Ubuntu 16.04 and want to install the official Telegram Linux app?

    Don’t run off to the official website to get the official binary: there’s now a Telegram app snap package available on Ubuntu 16.04.

  • Aquaris M10 Ubuntu Edition: a tablet that runs like a desktop

    At first, the Aquaris M10 Ubuntu Edition — often called the Ubuntu tablet — resembles most modern tablets, with a hard plastic case that folds into a stand, limited multi-tasking from an overview screen, and some ability to act like a workstation or laptop. However, even a tentative exploration reveals that the Ubuntu Edition is much more, due mostly to its operating system and the Unity interface, which comes of age at last on this tablet.

  • Meizu Pro 5 Ubuntu Edition Review
  • UbuntuBuzz Magazine #11 - Converting PDF
  • UbuntuBuzz Magazine #10 - sK1
  • NoNotifications: Use Do Not Disturb Feature in Ubuntu

    If you are trying to focus on your work and don't want to disable notifications completely then here is a tool called "NoNotifications" for you, which works in Ubuntu Unity. It is just a simple panel indicator which allows you to disable notification temporarily. This tool should be enhanced to offer more features like mobile OS's already have, to completely disable everything Like: tones, alerts, notifications, and so, and schedule a time to activate/deactivate could be a plus for this small application.

  • Temporarily Disable Notifications In Ubuntu (w/ Unity 7) With NoNotifications Indicator

    NoNotifications is a simple indicator for Ubuntu (Unity 7) that allows you to temporarily suppress NotifyOSD notifications. The tool is useful for presentations, when working, and so on, to prevent unwanted notifications from getting in your way or distracting you.

  • Ubuntu’s Got Tablet, Fedora’s Kernel Decision & More…

    Back in the hippie days there was a lot of talk about plastic people, which would be fake people. Back in those days, plastic people were to be avoided, as was plastic anything.

    How times have changed. These days we embrace a plastic world. As example, we replace carefully hand crafted wristwatches made to last a lifetime with electronic rhinestone wearables that will be obsolete in a year or two because they tell us how fast and how seldom we walk.

    You see, by the ’60s definition, plastic didn’t need to be made of plastic to be plastic. You dig?

    [...]

    Swapnil Bhartiya at CIO found BQ’s hardware to be more than up to the task and also thought that nearly all aspects of the Ubuntu Touch with convergence to be beyond super fantastic. Gesture swiping is amazing, Scopes are the best thing since sliced bread, and using convergence to run in full blown desktop mode is “one of it’s greatest features.” The App Store, which he calls the “most exciting part of this Ubuntu tablet,” disappoints him because despite having tons of cool apps he’s never seen offered for phones before, it doesn’t have a few things he likes.

    “After using the tablet for a while,” he opines, “I had to face the harsh reality that as much as wanted to like the tablet, the lack of what I consider essential native apps will prevent me from using it as my primary, or even as a secondary, device.”

    The only apps he mentions that he would like but which are MIA? “[N]one of the streaming services such as Netflix, Hulu or Amazon Prime are available on the device.”

    Maybe he should just buy himself a TV.

    [...]

    In case you missed it, the conference live streamed Corey Doctorow’s Thursday morning keynote address, called “Open, Closed, and Demon Haunted: An Internet of Things That Act Like Inkjet Printers,” along with all other keynotes throughout the event. Included below is a short snippet of the talk that’s available on YouTube. Doctorow’s complete talk is available online, but requires the opening of an account with O’Reilly in order to view it.

  • Cinnamon 3.0 - See What's New

    Cinnamon 3.0 is the latest release of Cinnamon Desktop Environment and it will become as default desktop for upcoming Linux Mint 18 codenamed "sarah".

Xubuntu Xenial Xerus - Triple X - The spy who failed me

Filed under
GNU
Linux
Reviews
Ubuntu

Before you read this conclusion, please do me a favor. Please read my review of Vivid, then go back up, find the links to the Werewolf review and the best distro of 2015 summary, and then read those, too. Then, come back to this piece here. Now, please try to explain, in human lingo, how it is possible than only one year apart, we get such a huge, drastic difference in the distro behavior.

Xubuntu 16.04 Xenial Xerus is meant to be the rock-solid LTS, beautiful and elegant and majestic. It is none of that. There are so many bugs and problems it really turns me off the whole Linux thing. I feel like an idiot for doing these reviews, for wasting hundreds and thousands of hours of my life trying to promote a cause and technology that ultimately just ends up failing randomly, because people can't be bothered to invest time in proper QA rather than pointless, arbitrary release dates and silly changes that serve no purpose.

Not good. Not good at all. Realtek issues, mouse going away after waking from sleep, login niggles, package management woes, sucky Bluetooth stack, Thunar hiccups, Samba crap. This is just a short list of everything that's wrong with Xenial, and then, to make it even worse, the Unity and the Xfce versions can't really agree on the suck list. They all have their own unique problems, and there's no consistency. I'm just pissed off. April 2016 was meant to be a happy, cheerful month. Now, I'm facing total destruction and distros that barely work. And yes, please, skip to the very end, and tell me how it's all my fault. Anyhow, Xubuntu Xerus gets only 3/10. Do not upgrade for now.

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Also: Xubuntu 16.04 - install and enjoy?

Mozilla Firefox 46.0.1 Lands in the Ubuntu Repos, But No Sign of Thunderbird 45

Filed under
Moz/FF
Ubuntu

Canonical recently pushed the first point release of the Mozilla Firefox 46.0 web browser to the stable channels for all supported Ubuntu Linux operating systems, along with Mozilla Thunderbird 38.8.0.

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Open-spec, octa-core “NanoPi M3” SBC sells for $35

Filed under
Android
Linux
Debian
Ubuntu

FriendlyARM’s NanoPi M3 SBC runs Linux or Android on a 64-bit, octa-core Samsung S5P6818, and offers WiFi, BT, GbE, and a 40-pin RPi connector.

In April, FriendlyARM blew away the scant competition in octa-core, 64-bit hacker SBCs with its $60 NanoPC-T3 board. Now it has stepped even harder on the affordability scale with a smaller, somewhat stripped down NanoPi M3 featuring the same Samsung S5P6818 octa-core SoC. The open-spec, community-backed boards sells for only $35, plus $10 shipping to the U.S.

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More in Tux Machines

Chakra GNU/Linux Users Get KDE Plasma 5.7.2, Qt 5.7 and KDE Applications 16.04.3

Chakra GNU/Linux developer Neofytos Kolokotronis today, July 25, 2016, announced the release of the latest KDE and Qt technologies, along with new software versions in the main repositories of the Linux kernel-based operating system. Read more

In a Quiet Market for PCs, Chromebooks are Marching Steadily Forward

It's no secret that Chrome OS has not been the same striking success for Google that the Android OS has been. And yet, Chromebooks--portable computers running the platform--have not only found their niche, but they are also introducing a new generation to cloud computing. Chromebooks are firmly entrenched in the education market, where many young users have become used to the convention of storing apps and data in the cloud. Now, according to new research from Gartner, Chromebooks are ready to hit new milestones. Analysts there report that Chromebook shipment growth will be in the double digits this year. At the same time, though, Chromebooks have not become fixtures in the enterprise, replacing Windows PCs. Read more

Server Administration

  • SysAdmins With Open Source Skills Are In Demand
    System administrators play a crucial role in businesses today. They are the individuals responsible for the configuration, support and maintenance of company computer systems and servers. For this reason, they are a popular hiring request, with defense and media companies alike looking for these professionals on Dice. Yet, despite the ongoing demand, finding and recruiting system administrators may be more of a challenge. Data from the U.S. Bureau of Labor Statistics (BLS) found that the quarterly unemployment rate for system administrators was 0.6%, well below the national quarterly average (4.9%) and the quarterly average for all tech professionals (2.1%). Employers thus need to focus more of their recruitment strategies on poaching this talent from competitors.
  • One Phrase Sysadmins Hate to Hear (And How to Avoid It)
    A few years later, sysarmy, the local IT community, was born as the "Support for those who give support." And in that spirit, for this 8th AdminFest edition, we want to do exactly that: support those who help others in our Q&A platform, sysarmy.com/help. Each 500 points a participant earns, he/she gets a free drink in return!
  • DevOps'n the Operating System
    John Willis takes a brief look at the history of how Devops principles and operating systems have converged. He spends most of the time forward looking at what and how unikernels will converge with Devops tools, processes and culture. He ends with a demo of how containers, unikernels and Devops ideas can work together in the future.
  • 5 reasons system administrators should use revision control
    Whether you're still using Subversion (SVN), or have moved to a distributed system like Git, revision control has found its place in modern operations infrastructures. If you listen to talks at conferences and see what new companies are doing, it can be easy to assume that everyone is now using revision control, and using it effectively. Unfortunately that's not the case. I routinely interact with organizations who either don't track changes in their infrastructure at all, or are not doing so in an effective manner. If you're looking for a way to convince your boss to spend the time to set it up, or are simply looking for some tips to improve how use it, the following are five tips for using revision control in operations.

Kernel Space/Linux