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Ubuntu

Canonical Releases Snapcraft 2.24 Snap Creator Tool for Ubuntu 16.04 and 16.10

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Ubuntu

Canonical's Sergio Schvezov had the great pleasure of announcing the release of Snapcraft 2.24, the latest stable version of the tool application developers can use for packaging their apps as Snaps, a universal binary format for Linux OSes.

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Leftovers: Ubuntu and Derivatives

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Ubuntu
  • Ubuntu spotted during AMD Instinct announcement
  • Ubuntu Unity 8 snap - edge r283
  • Ubuntu Unity 8 update
  • Get 50% off Linux Foundation training and certification

    It’s been a great year for Ubuntu. More and more cloud users are turning to Ubuntu for their needs on public clouds. On the private cloud side you can find us on most production deployments of OpenStack, and we’re bringing you the latest bits of Kubernetes and other exciting cloud technologies, like fresh Docker packages. That’s a ton of new technology, it can be challenging to keep on top of things!

  • SemiCode OS takes Ubuntu to next level

    While Canonical is keeping on expanding its presence in the world of open source, SemiCode OS has just emerged to take its Ubuntu to the next level. The platform uses Ubuntu 14.04 to deliver an advanced computing experience.

    SemiCode OS is designed as the Linux for programmers and web developers. As a replacement for Windows and macOS, the new operating system includes GNOME desktop environment. It also comes preloaded with IDEs of some popular programming languages.

    To nurture non-coders with some primary coding skills, the initial beta version of SemiCode OS has Scratch IDE. There are tools such as Slack and Git to support development teams.

  • Linux Mint 18.1 Cinnamon and MATE Released

    Clement Lefebvre today released Linux Mint 18.1 LTS in the Cinnamon and MATE flavors for 32 and 64-bit machines. Beta users can upgrade through the Update Manager, but 18.0 users will have to wait for until the end of the month. Today's release brought several updated components as well as new features.

    Linux Mint 18.1 features MATE 1.16 bringing additional GTK3 ports including the notification daemon, session manager, and MATE terminal. The Cinnamon version got a new screensaver application that looks and works much better. One can control multimedia from the screensaver screen without unlocking it, it can display the battery power level, and any missed notifications. Notifications can now have an accompanying sound if desired and panels can be set on the vertical. The sound applet can now control more than one device at a time and the keyboard applet can support more than one layout for the same language.

Leftovers: Ubuntu

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Ubuntu
  • Ubuntu To Begin Making Use Of Swapfiles In Place Of SWAP Partitions

    Ubuntu is going to begin making use of swapfiles in place of swap partitions on new (non-LVM) based installations.

  • Ubuntu 17.04 Swaps Swap Partitions for Swap Files

    Do you like, use or see the need for Swap partitions on your Ubuntu system? If not, Ubuntu 17.04 ships one change that’ll be of interest.

    Canonical’s Dimitri John Ledkov announced today that Ubuntu 17.04 will use Swap files by default on non-LVM installs (which if you just click through the installer, is the default setting).

    He explains that, quite simply, the need for a separate swap partition that’s (at least) twice the RAM size “makes little sense” on systems where memory isn’t limited.

  • Remote Code Execution Bug Found in Ubuntu Quantal

    A remote code execution bug has been patched in the default installation of Ubuntu Desktop affecting all default installations of Quantal version 12.10 and later.

Flaky Wi-Fi is an annoyance on the Ubuntu phone

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Ubuntu

While the Ubuntu phone has seen a great deal of improvement since it was launched in February 2015, one aspect of the operating system that does not work as it should is Wi-Fi.

A smartphone is useless without an Internet connection and if Wi-Fi connections keep going up and down like a yo-yo, then even the small number of people who would prefer a Linux phone to any other may well have to start looking elsewhere.

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Debian vs. Fedora

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Red Hat
Ubuntu

Debian Linux and the Fedora Project are among the most influential Linux distributions of all time. Not only are both Debian and Fedora among the top ten for page hits on Distrowatch, but many of the other top ten are derived from them. But why would you pick one over another?

To be honest, the differences are fewer than they were fifteen years ago. In 2003, when Fedora began, Debian was the main representative of the .deb package format, and Red Hat, Fedora's predecessor, represented the .rpm format, and your Linux experience was very different depending on which you chose. Since then, the differences have diminished, but there are still subtle differences that might influence your choice.

However, those differences no longer include package management. Around the turn of the millennium,.debs were alone in resolving package dependencies, but .rpms added the feature long ago. Today, contrary to old myths that refuse to die, using Fedora's dnf command to install packages is roughly equivalent to installing packages with Debian's apt- get. Even the comparative slowness of yum, dnf's predecessor, has become irrelevant as the change of tools becomes complete.

Where differences do exist is in the organization, governance, available system architectures, package repositories, and default installations. These differences may affect your choice, or simply be necessary to know to avoid uncertainty.

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Ubuntu Exodus

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Ubuntu
  • Ubuntu Exodus, Tumbleweed a Day, Open Source Notebook

    Two long-time Ubuntu developers have given their notice. It's probably just a coincidence, but if more leave it could only be bad news. Elsewhere, Tumbleweed has seen five releases in as many days and CoreOS has changed its name. Bash got a new logo and blogger DarkDuck said Zorin OS 12 is a diamond in the rough.

  • Taking a break

    It’s a bit strange to write this blog post in the same week as Martin Pitt is announcing moving on from Canonical. I remember many moments of Martin’s post very vividly and he was one of the first I ran into on my flight to Sydney for Ubuntu Down Under in 2005.

  • The alphabet and pitti end here: Last day at Canonical

Canonical Brain Drain

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Ubuntu
  • Longtime Ubuntu Developer Martin Pitt Leaving Canonical, Joining Red Hat
  • Another Veteran Ubuntu Member Is Leaving Canonical

    Well, this is a bit strange and hopefully just developers looking to recharge and find new endeavors for 2017 as opposed to any exodus, but just hours after writing about Martin Pitt leaving Canonical to join Red Hat, another longtime Ubuntu developer is leaving the company too.

    Martin Pitt had been at Canonical for 12.5 years while the other developer leaving was there for 11 years: Daniel Holbach. Daniel had been with Canonical since 2005 and served as a developer on the desktop team, founded Ubuntu's community teams, and then in the past few years had been working in community management and related community/relations areas.

Canonical's Snapd 2.19 Snappy Daemon Launches for Ubuntu Core 16 & Ubuntu 16.04

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Ubuntu

Canonical's Michael Vogt announced the release and general availability of the Snapd 2.19 Snappy daemon for Ubuntu Core 16, Ubuntu 16.10 (Yakkety Yak), and Ubuntu 16.04 LTS (Xenial Xerus) operating systems.

Snapd 2.19 is here almost three weeks after the release of Snapd 2.18 and only one week after its first maintenance update, version 2.18.1. According to the release notes, which we've attached at the end of the article for your reading pleasure, Snapd 2.19 is a major update implementing numerous improvements and new features.

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Also: Preview Linux Mint 18.1 (Serena) new features

Make Ubuntu Work Like ChromeOS

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OS
Ubuntu

It might surprise some of you that with a little effort, you can make Ubuntu work like ChromeOS. Best of all, you can do so and still keep Ubuntu's advantages. In this article, I'll share some tips and thoughts on how you can run Ubuntu with similar features to those found in ChromeOS.

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Devs Plan ‘Ultra Minimal’ Version of Ubuntu Budgie

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Ubuntu

You know I love a good tease, and the Ubuntu Budgie team have done just that.

Ubuntu Budgie tweets that it is testing an “ultra minimal version” of the spin which ‘uses 220MB or less of RAM’.

Intriguing.

The minimal spin is being pitched at users “who love customising their distro” and is unlikely to ship with much of anything pre-installed.

The team has shared precious little else about this nimble version but, assuming their claim is true, it could find itself pitched as a contender to other “lightweight” Linux distributions. The Budgie desktop the distro is based around is already fairly light compared to other modern desktop environments.

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More in Tux Machines

Leftovers: Software

  • Flowblade Video Editor 1.12 Released, Adds 2 New Tools
    A shiny new version of open-source video editor Flowblade is available for download. Flowblade 1.12 introduces a pair of new tools. Progress has also been made towards creating a distribution agnostic .AppImage, though, alas, there are still kinks to be ironed out so you won’t find an app image of the current release.
  • Vivaldi 1.8 Web Browser Launch Imminent As First Release Candidate Is Out
    Vivaldi's Ruarí Ødegaard announced today, March 24, 2017, the release and immediate availability of the first Release Candidate of the forthcoming Vivaldi 1.8 web browser for all supported platforms. Dubbed as Vivaldi Snapshot 1.8.770.44, the Release Candidate of Vivaldi 1.8 is here to fix some last-minute bugs for the new History feature, which is the star of the new upcoming web browser release based on the latest Chromium 57 open-source project, as well as to improve the user interface zoom functionality.
  • Epiphany 3.24 Web Browser Has New Bookmarks UI, Improves Tracking Protection
    GNOME 3.24 arrived a couple of days ago, and it's the biggest release of the popular desktop environment so far, shipping with lots of new features and improvements across all of its applications and components. During its 6-month development cycle, we managed to cover all the major features implemented in the GNOME 3.24 desktop environment, but also the various improvements included in many of the apps that are usually distributed under the GNOME Stack umbrella.
  • Firefox Sync Support Is Coming to GNOME Web
    GNOME Web (aka the browser formerly known as Epiphany) is working to add Firefox Sync support, letting users keep bookmarks, history and open-tabs in sync across devices.

Games and CrossOver

Red Hat and Fedora

Android Leftovers