Ubuntu

*buntu or Canonical news/reviews

Ubuntu 14.04 gets new lock screen and borderless windows

Filed under
GNU
Linux
Ubuntu

Canonical is making it really hard not to like Ubuntu 14.04 LTS. Last week, I discussed about the improvements and new features which has landed in Ubuntu 14.04. Since then, two new features have been added. Both of them have been previewed in earlier development cycles but never made it to a release build, until now.

Now Canonical is introducing brand new lock screen in Ubuntu 14.04, which is simply gorgeous. We have seen glimpses of this lock screen in the past. The proposal for this change was given way back in 2011.The bug report can be found here. The new lock screen is handled by LightDM and so it resembles the login screen. Unlike the previous lock screen, it now integrates well with the rest of the OS. Some of the system indicators such as sound, calendar (no meetings requests are displayed), user switching menu and language indicator are accessible while the screen is locked. Locking the screen does not stop music or video playback.

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Mir Gets Screencasting Improvements, Other Changes

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Ubuntu

While the Mir display server isn't being relied upon by the desktop in Ubuntu 14.04 LTS, it is being used right now by Ubuntu Touch and Canonical developers are still working on its development in a steadfast manner for deployment in a future Ubuntu Linux release. Here's some of the latest commits to Mir.

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Wil Wheaton ‘Not Crazy’ About Direction Ubuntu Is Taking

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Ubuntu

Not put off by his encounter with Unity, Wil goes on to mention that he opted to run the lightweight XFCE desktop on his Chromebook. Not his favourite, but one whose speed he appreciates and that evokes a nostalgia within him.

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Ubuntu 14.04 default and community wallpapers revealed

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Ubuntu

Continuing the new trend of adding community wallpapers to the default Ubuntu installation, Ubuntu devs released today 11 community contributed wallpapers to be included in the latest iteration of Ubuntu, 14.04 LTS. These 11 wallpapers were chosen from a community wallpaper contest which ended on 5th March. Shortly after releasing the community wallpapers, the default wallpaper was also released.

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Linux Bugs, Cheese Quesadilla, and Ubuntu Looks

Filed under
Linux
Ubuntu

It was a bit slow today, but have no fear, I was able to find several interesting stories. First up is Ubuntu and OMG!Ubuntu! reports on the new Ubuntu theme. Katherine Noyes puts her ear to the tracks for this week's bug reports. And finally, Bryan Lunduke says "Linux is like a cheese quesadilla."

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CeBIT: Ubuntu smartphones to cost between $200 and $400

Filed under
Ubuntu
Gadgets

Smartphones on Canonical’s Ubuntu operating system will cost between $200 and $400, according to the firm’s chief executive Mark Shuttleworth.

Speaking at CeBIT, he said: “Ours will come out in the mid-higher edge, so $200 to $400. We’re going with the higher end because we want people who are looking for a very sharp, beautiful experience and because our ambition is to be selling the future PC, the future personal computing engine.”

The Ubuntu project aims to produce hardware that can act as a smartphone and also work as a PC when plugged into a monitor, something Shuttleworth said many audiences found attractive.

Canonical teamed up with phone makers Meizu and BQ earlier this year to produce the devices, following what Shuttleworth called the “spectacular failure” of the firm’s efforts to raise $32m for the Ubuntu Edge smartphone. But he also called it a “spectacular success” because of the amount of attention it drew and the influence it could have on the industry.

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Is Ubuntu Animosity Misplaced?

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GNU
Linux
Ubuntu

As for the feelings of the Linux community in general, the consensus is that it felt like GNOME was somehow being slighted or ignored. Remember early on, Ubuntu was a GNOME-centric experience. While today, Ubuntu is most definitely Unity-centric instead. Obviously alternative desktop environments are a mere "apt-get install" away, but most people will use Ubuntu because they're fans of the entire experience – end to end.

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Makulu, Ubuntu, and Red Hat

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Red Hat
Ubuntu

Today's perusal of the headlines revealed a review of MakuluLinux 5, a Debian derivative with unusual default software. In addition, Matt Hartley asks if animosity towards Ubuntu is misplaced and recounts recent controversies. Finally today, another interview with Red Hat CEO and a review of Red Hat clone ClearOS are covered.

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Lubuntu might be the best Linux distro for Windows XP users

Filed under
Linux
Interviews
Ubuntu

In today's open source roundup: Lubuntu could be the best replacement for Windows XP. Plus: A review of Portal 2 for Linux, and an interview with the creator of educational distro Ubermix

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The Performance Impact Of Linux Disk Encryption On Ubuntu 14.04 LTS

Filed under
Linux
Ubuntu

For any Linux laptop users or those concerned about their data's safety on production systems, I highly recommend utilizing disk encryption for safeguarding the data. However, what's the performance impact like these days? In this article with the current development snapshot of Ubuntu 14.04 LTS on a modern Intel ultrabook we're looking at the impact (including CPU utilization) of using an eCryptfs-based home directory encryption and LUKS-based full-disk encryption on Ubuntu Linux.

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Distro diaspora: Four flavours of Ubuntu unpacked

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Linux
Ubuntu

Version 14.04, nicknamed Trusty Tahr, will be an important one because it culminates in a Long Term Support (LTS) version, the first in two years.

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Mark Shuttleworth Talks Up The Phone's Bottom Edge On Ubuntu

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Ubuntu

Daniel Oliver, a Canonical designer, earlier this week blogged about loving the bottom edge of phones. "The bottom edge is the most pleasurable edge to use. Grab a phone, any phone, and slide your thumb up over the bottom edge, then back. Go on, do it a few times. Feel good? Yeah, our extensive research suggests this feels pretty amazing to pretty much everyone."

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What to expect in Ubuntu 14.04 LTS

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Reviews
Ubuntu

Every two years a Long Term Support (LTS) release of Ubuntu is made available to the public. Every LTS is supported for 5 years by Canonical. This year is the year of LTS release and its just 1 month away. Canonical will be keen to keep up the stability of LTS release like it has done in the past. Lets have a quick look at what can we expect from this year’s LTS release.

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Ubuntu 14.04 beta 1 offers a sneak peek at 'Trusty Tahr'

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Reviews
Ubuntu

Not long ago we learned that Ubuntu will be ditching Unity’s global menu and returning to in-app menus instead. I’m hoping we’ll see that later this month when the next beta release arrives, since the main, Unity-based Ubuntu version will be participating in that one. Stay tuned for more updates when that happens.

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How to get a side launcher like Ubuntu on your Android device

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Android
Ubuntu

Ubuntu users get to take advantage of a sidebar giving them access to shortcuts for many programs. Thanks to the Glovebox, this app allows you to get this Ubuntu feature on your Android smartphone.

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30-Way Graphics Card Comparison On Ubuntu Linux 14.04 LTS

Filed under
Graphics/Benchmarks
Linux
Ubuntu

...in this article we are benchmarking the AMD Catalyst and NVIDIA binary drivers on Ubuntu Linux.

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Early Look at How Ubuntu 14.04 Trusty Is Shaping Up

Filed under
Ubuntu

The next Ubuntu Long-Term Release, codenamed Trusty Tahr, will be released on April 17th, 2014 and will ship with several notable features, while mainly focusing on stable main components rather than bleeding-edge software, a very good decision which fits perfectly such a big release. Trusty will be supported for five years on both the desktop and the server. I must say, this is a long awaited release, and probably not only by Ubuntu users, but also the ones of Mint and other distributions based upon Ubuntu, since the upcoming Mint 17 will be based on Trusty. I’m really expecting a solid experience here, which could last for years as a main desktop and development machine.

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Ubuntu Gnome wants to get LTS status

Filed under
GNOME
Ubuntu

Ubuntu Gnome team wants to join the elite club of Ubuntu flavours which enjoy the LTS (Long Term Support) status. 14.04 is going to be an LTS release and its apt for Ubuntu Gnome team to get extended support of 2 years and 3 months as an LTS release which will make it easier for those users to use Gnome who want to use stable LTS releases.

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Android woes could be an opportunity for Ubuntu smartphones

Filed under
Android
Ubuntu
Gadgets

Canonical announced in February that it plans to release smartphones based on its widely used Ubuntu distribution of the Linux platform are back on, with the first devices expected later this year.

This triggered eager anticipation among some members of the V3 team, including yours truly, as Canonical's original vision for an Ubuntu phone sounded like a compelling prospect, as well as a novel one for those of us who have seen smartphones become ever-more generic over recent years as vendors try to copy Apple's formula for success.

First disclosed early last year, Canonical proposed a version of Ubuntu with a touch-optimised user interface that could run on high-end smartphone hardware. While some mobile platforms, notably Android, are already underpinned by the Linux kernel, Ubuntu for phones was going to be the real deal; it would be able to run full Linux applications as well as HTML5 web apps optimised for mobile devices.

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Ubuntu is the most used OS for production OpenStack deployments

Filed under
Linux
Server
Ubuntu

According to an official OpenStack User Survey Ubuntu is the most used Operating System for production deployment of OpenStack. OpenStack is an Open Source project to build a framework for the creation of cloud platforms, predominately Infrastructure as a Service (IaaS) platforms. The survey found that Ubuntu accounts for 55% of the host Operating Systems used for OpenStack deployments, CentOS accounts for 24% and Red Hat for 10%. These results are not completely surprising as Canonical invests heavily in Ubuntu’s OpenStack development, it was one of the founding members of The OpenStack Foundation and is a Platinum Sponsor of the foundation.

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