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Ubuntu

Bionic Beaver 18.04 LTS to use Xorg by default

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Ubuntu

Bionic Beaver, the codename for the next Ubuntu LTS release, is due in April 2018 and will ship with both the traditional Xorg graphics stack as well as the newer Wayland based stack, but Xorg will be the default.

17.10, released in October 2017, ships with the Wayland based graphics server as the default and the Xorg based equivalent is available as an option from the login screen. When we started out on the GNOME Shell route for 17.10 (Artful Aardvark) we knew that we needed to have Wayland as the default option otherwise we wouldn’t know if it would work well for our users in the LTS only 6 months later. The LTS is supported for five years meaning that we need to be certain that what goes out the door on release day will be maintainable and sustainable for the duration and will serve all our users and customers needs, which is no mean feat.

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Also: Ubuntu 18.04 LTS (Bionic Beaver) Will Ship with XOrg by Default, Says Canonical

Ubuntu Linux 18.04 'Bionic Beaver' LTS will default to Xorg

Ubuntu 18.04 LTS Will Default To The X.Org Stack, Not Wayland

Canonical/Ubuntu: Ubuntu Development Summary, LXD, and Kernel Patches for Intel's Sabotage

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Ubuntu
  • Ubuntu Development Summary – 23 Jan 2018

    The purpose of this communication is to provide a status update and highlights for any interesting subjects from the Ubuntu Server Team. If you would like to reach the server team, you can find us at the #ubuntu-server channel on Freenode. Alternatively, you can sign up and use the Ubuntu Server Team mailing list.

  • LXD Weekly Status #31

    Nothing too major happened this past week. Part of the time was at an internal planning meeting and the rest have been working on clustering, preparation for 3.0 and fixing a variety of bugs.

  • Kernel Team Summary: January 24, 2018

    The Kernel Team is completely focused on addressing any Spectre and Meltdown issues as they arise. A secure Ubuntu is our top priority. No new Livepatches are being produced and our regular SRU cycles are suspended while we address Spectre and Meltdown.

  • Meltdown, Spectre and Ubuntu: What you need to know

    As details of the Meltdown and Spectre vulnerabilities1 have become clearer a number of statements have been published by the multiple vendors affected; Canonical has issued advisories and updates on fixes and mitigations, the latest of which mitigate known Spectre attacks. However, most of these statements focus on the mechanics of applying fixes and corresponding damage control, and not on explaining what the problems are, how the mitigations work, and how they may affect you.

Canonical Releases Spectre Patches for Ubuntu Linux, Meltdown Fix for PowerPC

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Security
Ubuntu

Canonical published today a new set of kernel updates for all of its supported Ubuntu Linux releases that include patches for the Spectre and Meltdown security vulnerabilities.

After pulling Intel's microcode firmware update from the software repositories of Ubuntu 17.10, 16.04 LTS, and 14.04 LTS, Canonical now released the Spectre patches for all supported Ubuntu Linux releases, including all official flavors and those using HWE (Hardware Enablement) kernels, and Meltdown kernel patches for PowerPC (PPC64el) architectures.

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Also: Canonical announces Ubuntu product month for February

Welcome To The (Ubuntu) Bionic Age: Nautilus, a LTS and desktop icons

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Ubuntu

If you are following closely the news of various tech websites, one of the latest hot topic in the community was about Nautilus removing desktop icons. Let’s try to clarify some points to ensure the various discussions around it have enough background information and not reacting on emotions only as it could be seen lately. You will have both downstream (mine) and upstream (Carlos) perspectives here.

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Canonical Says Ubuntu 18.04 LTS (Bionic Beaver) Will Come with Boot Speed Boost

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Ubuntu

Canonical's Will Cooke published a new Ubuntu Desktop newsletter today to inform the community on the development progress of the upcoming Ubuntu 18.04 LTS (Bionic Beaver) operating system.

Besides various improvements for the GNOME desktop environment, the Ubuntu Desktop team over at Canonical recently started to investigate the boot speed of the Ubuntu Linux operating system, planning to give it another boost by using systemd’s latest features to do some profiling, which will help them identify any issues that might cause slow boot up time.

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Also: Canonical Pulls Intel's Spectre Update from Ubuntu Repos Due to Hardware Issues

FOSS Linux App Development In Decline, Canonical Promotes Snap Using Proprietary Software

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Ubuntu
  • Is Native Linux App Development In Decline?

    A blog like mine thrives, in part, on there being a steady supply of good quality native Linux apps to write about.

    We do news too of course, and tutorials, how tos, lists, eye candy, and even the odd opinion piece (like this post). But I know you like reading about new and updated Linux apps, and, to be fair, I like writing about them.

    And yet… Where have all the Linux apps gone?

    Bear with me as what follows is more of a ramble than a coherent essay. For background, I’m writing this on day four of an enthusiasm drought.

  • Slack launches on Linux
  • Slack gets the Linux treatment: New snap available for Mint, Ubuntu, Debian, and more

    Slack is now available as a snap, which means Linux users can take advantage of the workplace collaboration platform, Canonical announced last week.

    Slack has recently debuted a number of features that make it more appealing to businesses, including Shared Channels and Private Shared Channels, which allow employees from different companies to work together on projects in private if they so choose. With more than 9 million weekly active users, Slack has gained a lot of traction in the enterprise, as noted by our sister site ZDNet.

    Back in October 2017, Linux overtook MacOS for the first time in terms of global operating system market share—which means the move opens up even more users to the Slack platform.

  • Canonical slaps Slack snap onto stack

    As the ‘company behind’ Ubuntu, Canonical has brought forward the first iteration of Slack as a snap on its software platform.

    Slack is a cloud-based set of proprietary team collaboration tools and services that go some way beyond core ‘messaging’ functionality into areas including project management.

Review: Ubuntu MATE 17.10

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Reviews
Ubuntu

Ubuntu MATE 17.10 is a solid release with a few minor caveats about the Mutiny layout. The Traditional MATE layout is very nice, but Mutiny still needs some work. For users who want the classic GNOME 2 look-and-feel, Ubuntu MATE is an excellent choice. However, Unity users looking for a Unity-like experience should still give Ubuntu MATE with the Mutiny layout a try, but need to be aware that it does have some issues and it won't work exactly like Unity. The Contemporary layout is also an option for Unity users, but is even further removed from the Unity experience than Mutiny is.

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Our Favourite Apps for Ubuntu

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Ubuntu

We enjoy using Ubuntu mainly for gaming, writing, listening to music and browsing the web. (Lots and lots of browsing the web.) There are other apps that we would love to have on Ubuntu like Affinity Photo, a stunning image editor that’s on par with Adobe’s Photoshop that’s available on Windows and Mac as well as Bear, a beautifully designed note taking app that we do most of our writing on that’s only available for macOS.

However, the Ubuntu platform has moved forward in leaps and bounds in recent years when it comes to the official availability of popular apps and we are confident that this trend will continue.

What’s your favourite Ubuntu apps?

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Debian and Ubuntu: TLCockpit, Google, ROS and Ubuntu Core

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Debian
Ubuntu
  • TLCockpit v0.8

    Today I released v0.8 of TLCockpit, the GUI front-end for the TeX Live Manager tlmgr. I spent the winter holidays in updating and polishing, but also in helping me debug problems that users have reported. Hopefully the new version works better for all.

  • Google's Linux workstations are switching from Ubuntu to Debian

    Like many companies, Google uses a variety of operating systems in-house. macOS and Windows are used by a large number of employees, a modified build of Debian Linux is used on its servers (as of 2014, at least), and Chrome OS and Android devices are commonplace. In work environments where Linux is needed, Google uses a customized version of Ubuntu 14.04 called 'Goobuntu,' which has never been released publicly.

  • Your first robot: Introduction to the Robot Operating System [2/5]

    This is the second blog post in this series about creating your first robot with ROS and Ubuntu Core. In the previous post we walked through all the hardware necessary to follow this series, and introduced Ubuntu Core, the operating system for IoT devices. We installed it on our Raspberry Pi, and used it to go through the CamJam worksheets. In this post, I’m going to introduce you to the Robot Operating System (ROS), and we’ll use it to move our robot.

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Slack as a Snap

Filed under
Software
Ubuntu
  • In a Snap, Slack Comes to Linux. Here's How To Install It

    While binaries for Slack have been available for Ubuntu and Fedora, other Linux operating systems are not so lucky. To overcome this, Canonical has released Slack as a Snap, which allows Slack to be installed and used on a greater variety of Linux distributions.

    Snapcraft is a command line tool that allows you to install containerised applications called Snaps on many different Linux distribution. As these Snap containers contain all the required dependencies that a program needs to run, it makes it very easy to create and distribute a single container that works on a variety of Linux versions.

  • Linux Users Can Now Download Slack as a ‘Snap’

    Slack is one step closer to becoming the workplace staple for businesses across the globe. The software is now available for use on Linux environments, bundled as a Snap – an application package for opensource systems.

    Tens of millions of users across the world run Linux on their systems, opting for one among its many distribution avatars. In comparison, Slack reported that over 6 million active profiles used the app daily last year, 2 million of them with paid subscriptions. The new release could open Slack up to a whole new set of customers.

  • Slack has arrived on Linux thanks to Canonical Snap

    CANONICAL HAS made the wishes of its users come true again as it brings another major app to Linux users for the first time.

    This time it's popular team platform Slack. The secret sauce is Ubuntu's "Snap" packages, a form of containerisation which puts an app into a little bubble that makes it run in the Linux environment. At Christmas, the technique was used to bring a desktop Spotify to Linux for the first time.

    The important thing here is that Snaps, first launched in 2016, run on any Linux distro, not just Canonical's own Ubuntu. Named specifically were Linux Mint, Manjaro, Debian, ArchLinux, OpenSUSE and Solus. Not only that, they work across desktop, server, cloud and IoT.

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Openwashing: Intel, Apple, and Microsoft

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An introduction to the GNU Core Utilities

These two collections of Linux utilities, the GNU Core Utilities and util-linux, together provide the basic utilities required to administer a Linux system. As I researched this article, I found several interesting utilities I never knew about. Many of these commands are seldom needed, but when you need them, they are indispensable. Between these two collections, there are over 200 Linux utilities. While Linux has many more commands, these are the ones needed to manage the basic functions of a typical Linux host. Read more