Language Selection

English French German Italian Portuguese Spanish

Ubuntu

Desktop: Fedora 27 and Next/Existing Ubuntu

Filed under
Red Hat
Ubuntu
  • Overview of aarch64 SBC support in Fedora 27

    Support for ARM 64 bit (aarch64) Single Board Computers (SBCs) has been one of the most highly requested features along side the Raspberry Pi. It’s something I’ve been working towards almost as long too. Finally with Fedora 27 I felt we would have enough of the bits in place for a Minimum Viable Product (MVP).

  • Call for participation: an ubuntu default theme lead by the community?

    As part of our Unity 7 to GNOME Shell transition in 17.10, we had last August a Fit and Finish Sprint at the London office to get the Shell feeling more like Ubuntu and we added some tweaks to our default GTK theme.

  • Mesa 17.2.4 for Ubuntu 16.04 & 17.10

    Hi, the X-SWAT updates PPA has actually shipped Mesa 17.2 for 16.04 for a few weeks now, but it got bumped to the latest stable release yesterday. It’s available for the latest Ubuntu LTS (16.04) plus most recent interim release (17.10) as usual.

Ubuntu: Ubuntu Theme, Sound, and Firefox Quantum

Filed under
Ubuntu
  • Does Ubuntu Need a New Theme? [Poll]

    Does Ubuntu need a new theme? Ubuntu developers certainly think so. They’ve started a new initiative to try and find a new GTK theme (as well as new GNOME Shell theme and icon set). But is Ambiance really outdated and unfit for purpose?

  • Ubuntu Is Looking for a New Theme

    Ubuntu 18.04 LTS will be the next gold-standard Ubuntu release when it arrives in April 2018 — and it seems it could have a shiny new theme to boot.

    Ubuntu developers are hoping to run an Ubuntu theme contest (or more accurately let the community run one with some oversight and guidance).

  • Ubuntu 18.04 LTS Might End Up Redoing The System Sounds

    The latest in the development of the "Bionic Beaver" is that new system sounds might come to Ubuntu 18.04 LTS.

    Following a discussion, there appears to be interest in redoing the system sounds for the Beaver release. Though at the moment there is no new sounds already being suggested as the replacement and a shortage of resources by the Ubuntu desktop team itself. The sounds of Ubuntu Touch were also brought up into the discussion.

  • How to Install Firefox Quantum in Ubuntu Right Now

    Mozilla has an official PPA to test the beta version. You can use the same PPA to install Firefox Quantum.

Canonical Wants You to Contribute to the Default Theme for Ubuntu 18.04 LTS

Filed under
Ubuntu

As you probably know, Didier Roche was the one to lead the huge migration task from the Unity 7 user interface to the GNOME Shell one during the development cycle of Ubuntu 17.10 (Artful Aardvark), the current stable release of Ubuntu.

During Artful cycle, the team lead by Didier Roche only managed to create a fork of the popular Dash-to-Dock extension for the GNOME Shell user interface that they call Ubuntu Dock, as well as some minor modifications to adapt their old Ambiance theme to the GNOME desktop environment.

Read more

Ubuntu 18.04 Daily Builds Now Available to Download

Filed under
Ubuntu

Ubuntu 18.04 daily builds are now available to download. Their availability comes as the Ubuntu 18.04 LTS 'Bionic Beaver' development cycle gets in to gear.

Read more

Ubuntu 17.10 - unhappy remarriage

Filed under
Reviews
Ubuntu

Ubuntu 17.10 is a new operating system not just because it was released very recently, in October 2017. It is also the first operating system from Canonical since it reverted from Unity to the GNOME desktop environment as default. It was GNOME 2 in use at the divorce time, and now it is GNOME 3 after the re-marriage.

Linux notes from DarkDuck has already reviewed the GNOME version of Ubuntu, when Unity was still in place. There is also a quick screenshot-style review of Ubuntu 17.10, but it is now time to get a more in-depth look into this operating system.

Read more

Ubuntu Leftovers

Filed under
Ubuntu

Ubuntu 18.04 LTS (Bionic Beaver) Daily Builds Now Available to Download

Filed under
Ubuntu

Canonical CEO Mark Shuttleworth dubbed the upcoming Ubuntu 18.04 LTS operating system as the "Bionic Beaver," but he didn't reveal any of the plans for the next long-term supported release of one of the most popular free operating systems in the world, which Canonical will maintain for the next five years.

Ubuntu 18.04 LTS (Bionic Beaver) is in early development stages, which means that the daily build ISO image is currently based on the stable branch, Ubuntu 17.10 (Artful Aardvark). As such, it's running the Linux 4.13 kernel and uses the latest GNOME 3.26 desktop environment.

Read more

Also: Daily ISOs Begin For Ubuntu 18.04 LTS "Bionic Beaver"

Review of Ubuntu 17.10 and Other Caonical/Ubuntu News

Filed under
Ubuntu
  • Ubuntu 17.10 - unhappy remarriage

    Ubuntu 17.10 is a new operating system not just because it was released very recently, in October 2017. It is also the first operating system from Canonical since it reverted from Unity to the GNOME desktop environment as default. It was GNOME 2 in use at the divorce time, and now it is GNOME 3 after the re-marriage.

    Linux notes from DarkDuck has already reviewed the GNOME version of Ubuntu, when Unity was still in place. There is also a quick screenshot-style review of Ubuntu 17.10, but it is now time to get a more in-depth look into this operating system.

    Ubuntu 17.10 is available to download through a large global network of mirrors, and torrents are available. The 32-bit ISO images are no longer available, only the 64-bit. The most recent 32-bit image for Ubuntu users is Ubuntu 16.04 LTS, which still will be supported for a few more years. However, all newer versions will only be available with the 64-bit kernel, unless you are looking for the low-resource distributions like Lubuntu or Xubuntu.

  • What Unity Users Need to Know About Ubuntu 17.10’s GNOME Shell

    Rather than clicking the Ubuntu logo icon at the top of the launcher, you’ll click the 9-dot “Show Applications” button at the bottom of the dock to view, search, and launch your installed applications. Most of the applications are the same ones Ubuntu used on Unity, as Unity has always borrowed a lot of applications from GNOME.

  • LXD Weekly Status #22
  • Top snaps in October: IntelliJ IDEA, MuseScore and more

    Hot on the heels of the Ubuntu 17.10 release, the snap store has seen some great additions for musicians with MuseScore, for developers with IntelliJ IDEA, and many more! Let’s have a look at our october selection...

Black Lab Enterprise Linux 11.5 Distro Coming Soon Based on Ubuntu 16.04.3 LTS

Filed under
Linux
Ubuntu

If you're wondering, there weren't any other betas released for the Black Lab Enterprise Linux 11.5 operating system, so the Beta 3 release comes as a surprise to us all. It rebases the OS on Canonical's latest Ubuntu 16.04.3 LTS (Xenial Xerus) operating system and brings various performance improvements.

For example, the driver capabilities have been increased through the inclusion of a new Linux kernel, and the operating system now offers much better performance on various devices. However, this beta release still has some known issues, especially with Microsoft Surface computers, as noted in the release announcement.

Read more

Debian. Ubuntu and Derivatives

Filed under
Debian
Ubuntu
  • Reviving GHDL in Debian

    It has been a few years since Debian last had a working VHDL simulator in the archive. Its competitor Verilog has been covered by the iverilog and verilator simulator packages, but GHDL was the only option for VHDL in Debian and that has become broken, orphaned and was eventually removed. I have just submitted an ITP to make my work on it official.

    A lot has changed since the last Debian upload of GHDL. Upstream development is quite active and it has gained free reimplementations of the standard library definitions (the lack of which frustrated at least two attempts at adoption of the Debian package). It has gained additional backends, in addition to GCC it can now also use LLVM and its own custom mcode (x86 only) code generator. The mcode backend should provide faster compilation at the expense of lacking sophisticated optimization, hence it might be preferable over the other two for small projects.

  • Thorsten Alteholz: My Debian Activities in October 2017
  • debconf mailinglists moved to lists.debian.org

    Today I had the pleasure to move the debconf mailinglists to lists.debian.org.

  • Ubuntu Podcast: S10E35 – Berserk Miniature Need
  • LXTerminal 0.3.1 released

    This is an security and bugfix update. However, there is also minor feature added to enhance usability. It will be integrated into Lubuntu very soon.

Syndicate content

More in Tux Machines

GNOME: WebKit, Fleet Commander, Introducing deviced

  • On Compiling WebKit (now twice as fast!)
    Are you tired of waiting for ages to build large C++ projects like WebKit? Slow headers are generally the problem. Your C++ source code file #includes a few headers, all those headers #include more, and those headers #include more, and more, and more, and since it’s C++ a bunch of these headers contain lots of complex templates to slow down things even more. Not fun.
  • Fleet Commander is looking for a GSoC student to help us take over the world
    Fleet Commander has seen quite a lot of progress recently, of which I should blog about soon. For those unaware, Fleet Commander is an effort to make GNOME great for IT administrators in large deployments, allowing them to deploy desktop and application configuration profiles across hundreds of machines with ease through a web administration UI based on Cockpit. It is mostly implemented in Python.
  • Introducing deviced
    Over the past couple of weeks I’ve been heads down working on a new tool along with Patrick Griffis. The purpose of this tool is to make it easier to integrate IDEs and other tooling with GNU-based gadgets like phones, tablets, infotainment, and IoT devices. Years ago I was working on a GNOME-based home router with davidz which sadly we never finished. One thing that was obvious to me in that moment of time was that I’m not doing another large scale project until I had better tooling. That is Builder’s genesis, and device integration is what will make it truly useful to myself and others who love playing with GNU-friendly gadgets.

KDE: Usability & Productivity, AtCore , Krita

  • This week in Usability & Productivity, part 6
  • AtCore takes to the pi
    The Raspberry Pi3 is a small single board computer that costs around $35 (USD). It comes with a network port, wifi , bt , 4 usb ports , gpio pins , camera port , a display out, hdmi, a TRRS for analog A/V out. 1GB of ran and 4 ~1GHz armv8 cores Inside small SOC. Its storage is a microSd card they are a low cost and low power device. The Touchscreen kit is an 800×480 display that hooks to the Gpio for touch and dsi port for video. To hold our hardware is the standard touch screen enclosure that often comes with the screen if you buy it in a kit.
  • Look, new presets! Another Krita 4 development build!
    We’ve been focusing like crazy on the Krita 4 release. We managed to close some 150 bugs in the past month, and Krita 4 is getting stable enough for many people to use day in, day out. There’s still more to be done, of course! So we’ll continue fixing issues and applying polish for at least another four weeks. One of the things we’re doing as well is redesigning the set of default brush presets and brush tips that come with Krita. Brush tips are the little images one can paint with, and brush presets are the brushes you can select in the brush palette or brush popup. The combination of a tip, some settings and a smart bit of coding! Our old set was fine, but it was based on David Revoy‘s earliest Krita brush bundles, and for Krita 4 we are revamping the entire set. We’ve added many new options to the brushes since then! So, many artists are working together to create a good-looking, useful and interesting brushes for Krita 4.

Software: GIMP, Spyder, SMPlayer

  • Five free photo and video editing tools that could save burning a hole in your pocket and take your creativity to the next level
    GIMP stands for the Gnu Image Manipulation Program and is the first word that people usually think about when it comes to free image editors. It’s a raster graphics editor, available on multiple platforms on PC. It has a similar interface to Photoshop: you have your tools on one side, there’s an option for your tool window and then you have your layers window on another side. Perhaps one of the most useful features of GIMP is the option of plugins. There is a wide database for them and there’s a plugin for almost any task you might need to carry out. GIMP is extremely extensive, and it’s the choice of the FOSS community, thanks to the fact that it’s also open source. However, there are also some disadvantages. For example, GIMP has no direct RAW support yet (you have to install a plugin to enable it, which means a split workflow). It also has quite a bit of a learning curve as compared to Photoshop or Lightroom.
  • Introducing Spyder, the Scientific PYthon Development EnviRonment
    If you want to use Anaconda for science projects, one of the first things to consider is the spyder package, which is included in the basic Anaconda installation. Spyder is short for Scientific PYthon Development EnviRonment. Think of it as an IDE for scientific programming within Python.
  • SMPlayer 18.2.2 Released, Install In Ubuntu/Linux Mint Via PPA
    SMPlayer is a free media player created for Linux and Windows, it was released under GNU General Public License. Unlike other players it doesn't require you to install codecs to play something because it carries its own all required codecs with itself. This is the first release which now support MPV and some other features such as MPRIS v2 Support, new theme, 3D stereo filter and more. It uses the award-winning MPlayer as playback engine which is capable of playing almost all known video and audio formats (avi, mkv, wmv, mp4, mpeg... see list).

Funding: Ethereum and Outreachy

  • How Will a $100 Mln Grant Help Ethereum Scale?
    On Feb. 16, six large-scale Blockchain projects OmiseGo, Cosmos, Golem, Maker and Raiden, that have completed successful multi-million dollar initial coin offerings (ICOs) last year, along with Japanese venture capital firm Global Brain have created the Ethereum Community Fund (ECF), to fund projects and businesses within the Ethereum ecosystem.
  • Outreachy Is Now Accepting Applications For Their Summer 2018 Internships
    This week Google announced the participating organizations for GSoC 2018 for students wishing to get involved with open-source/Linux development. Also happening this week is the application period opened for those wishing to participate in the summer 2018 paid internship program.