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Ubuntu

Leftovers: Ubuntu

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Ubuntu
  • HOWTO: Host your own SNAP store!

    SNAPs are the cross-distro, cross-cloud, cross-device Linux packaging format of the future. And we're already hosting a fantastic catalog of SNAPs in the SNAP store provided by Canonical. Developers are welcome to publish their software for distribution across hundreds millions of Ubuntu servers, desktops, and devices.

    Several people have asked the inevitable open source software question, "SNAPs are awesome, but how can I stand up my own SNAP store?!?"

    The answer is really quite simple... SNAP stores are really just HTTP web servers! Of course, you can get fancy with branding, and authentication, and certificates. But if you just want to host SNAPs and enable downstream users to fetch and install software, well, it's pretty trivial.

  • The Open(Snap)Store

    There has been a major update to the OpenStore today. We now fully support snaps! Due to the huge push by Ubuntu and Canonical around snaps recently, we decided to integrate snaps into the OpenStore. Thanks to some work by Marius Gripsgård (mariogrip) parsing data from snap packages was super easy (check out the click-parser library). After that it was just a matter of integrating snaps fully into the website.

  • bitmath – Now available in Ubuntu PPAs
  • Installation Media and supportability of i386 in 18.04 LTS Re: Ubuntu Desktop on i386
  • Must-Know Ubuntu Terminal Commands for a Smart User
  • Here's How To Get .NET Core Running On Ubuntu [Ed: How to infect GNU/Linux with a Microsoft Trojan horse and software patents trap which is not Open Source but Open Core]
  • elementary OS 0.4 Loki

    The developers of elementary OS have released a new development snapshot. The new beta, elementary OS 0.4 Beta, carries the code name “Loki” and is built using software from the Ubuntu 16.04 LTS repositories. One of the significant new features is the removal of tools which make it easy to (accidentally) install software which has not been vetted.

  • gobanglinux "pure" openbox

Leftovers: Ubuntu

Filed under
Ubuntu

Leftovers: Ubuntu, Mint, and Debian

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GNU
Linux
Debian
Ubuntu
  • End of an era: Linux distributions will soon stop supporting 32-bit PCs

    AMD and Intel released the first 64-bit CPUs for consumers back in 2003 and 2004. Now, more than a decade later, Linux distributions are looking at winding down support for 32-bit hardware.

    Google already took this leap back in 2015, dumping 32-bit versions of Chrome for Linux.

  • Ubuntu 16.10 Yakkety Yak Alpha 1 Released
  • Linux Mint 18 Brings Mint-Y Theme to Linux Deskto

    The Linux Mint 18 milestone release is the first major update for the popular desktop Linux distribution in 2016 and follows the Linux Mint 17.3 update that debuted in December 2015. Linux Mint 18 is based on the Ubuntu 16.04 Long Term Support (LTS) Linux distribution released April 21 and, like Ubuntu 16.04, Linux Mint 18 is being supported as an LTS, with support until the year 2021. As was the case with previous Linux Mint distribution updates, there are multiple desktop environment choices. Cinnamon 3.0, which is developed by Linux Mint and typically is the primary deployment choice for users, brings new window tiling capabilities and default effects for window transitions and actions. Additionally, Linux Mint 18 includes a new desktop theme option called Mint-Y that brings newly styled icons to users. In terms of new integrated applications, Linux Mint 18 includes the gufw application, a graphical interface for firewall configuration. In this slide show, eWEEK takes a look at some of the highlights of the Linux Mint 18.

  • My Free Software Activities in June 2016
  • Debian: Reproducible builds update

Leftovers: Ubuntu and Debian

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Debian
Ubuntu

Ubuntu 16.10 Alpha 1 Is Out for Opt-in Flavors, Final Release to Land October 13

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Ubuntu

Believe it or not, the development cycle of the next Ubuntu release has started, and a first Alpha build is now officially released, today, June 30, 2016, as expected based on the release schedule for Ubuntu 16.10 (Yakkety Yak).

Read more

Also: Ubuntu MATE 16.10 Alpha 1 Arrives with MATE 1.14 Built Entirely Against GTK 3.18

Lubuntu 16.10 Alpha 1 Officially Released with LXDE and Linux Kernel 4.4 LTS

Ubuntu Kylin 16.04 Alpha 1 Now Available for Chinese Users with Linux Kernel 4.4

Meizu MX6 with Ubuntu

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Ubuntu
  • Exclusive: Meizu MX6 Ubuntu Edition Promo Images Surface

    Meizu had introduced three new smartphones back in April, the Meizu M3, M3 Note and the PRO 6 flagship. This China-based company is expected to introduce a couple of more devices this year, and the Meizu MX6 handset seems to be the next in line. Its predecessor was announced back in July 2015, and it sported a really compelling spec sheet, while it wasn’t that expensive at all. The Meizu MX5 shipped with a 5.5-inch fullHD display, 3GB of RAM and the Helio X10 64-bit octa-core processor, which was MediaTek’s flagship processor back then. The MX5 also came with a full metal body, and its 20.7-megapixel rear-facing camera was also quite capable.

  • New Ubuntu-Powered Meizu Smartphone Codenamed ‘Midori’ is in the Works

    There are reports that Meizu's upcoming smartphone codenamed "Midori" will run on a new edition of Ubuntu.

  • Meizu MX6 Spy Shot Leaked Along With Specs and Price

    It has been a couple of months since the Meizu PRO 6 was announced, and the phone has got its fair share of popularity. Meanwhile, the Chinese manufacturer is believed to be working on the next MX flagship, the Meizu MX6. Today, we have spotted a new spyshot of the phone along with its specs and price have surfaced online on Chinese site Weibo.

Don’t want to pay for Windows 10? Try Ubuntu - the free operating system

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Ubuntu

In the ever-changing world of high-tech gadgets and gizmos, a whole load of jargon is thrown our way that many of us don’t necessarily understand.

In our regular series What is… we tackle a tech term or object and explain what it means so you can understand it a bit more.

Here we explain Ubuntu, an alternative operating system that works across PC, tablet and more.

Read more

Also: Canonical 32-bit PC Support Being Dropped for Ubuntu

Ubuntu Snap Packages Can Now Run on Any Linux Distro

Is Canonical the Victim of High Expectations?

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Ubuntu

When Ubuntu was new, those who questioned it were mostly Debian developers, disgruntled because they were not hired or because Ubuntu failed to acknowledge its debt to Debian. Today, however, a vocal minority seems to view Canonical Software, the company behind Ubuntu, as a Microsoft in the making. From being the uncritical darling of open source, Canonical is closely and cynically scrutinized, and its motives constantly questioned.

So how did this transformation happen? Suspicion about corporations is hardly new in open source, yet Canonical seems singled out in a way that SUSE or Red Hat only occasionally are.

Read more

Canonical Releases Snapcraft 2.12 Snaps Creator with New Parts Ecosystem, More

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Ubuntu

Today, June 29, 2016, Canonical has had the great pleasure of announcing the release of the highly anticipated Snapcraft 2.12 Snappy creator tool for the Ubuntu Linux operating system.

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AMDGPU-PRO Driver 16.30 Officially Released with Support for Ubuntu 16.04 LTS

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Ubuntu

Today, June 29, 2016, AMD released the final version of the AMDGPU-Pro 16.30 graphics driver for GNU/Linux operating systems, bringing support for new technologies like the Vulkan API.

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More in Tux Machines

Avidemux 2.6.13 Open-Source Video Editor Gets AAC/ADTS Import and Export

The developers of the Avidemux open-source and cross-platform video editor software have announced a new maintenance update in the 2.6 series, bringing multiple improvements, bug fixes, and a handful of new features. Read more

5 Best Linux Distros for Security

Security is nothing new to Linux distributions. Linux distros have always emphasized security and related matters like firewalls, penetration testing, anonymity, and privacy. So it is hardly surprising that security conscious distributions are common place. For instance, Distrowatch lists sixteen distros that specialize in firewalls, and four for privacy. Most of these specialty security distributions, however, share the same drawback: they are tools for experts, not average users. Only recently have security distributions tried to make security features generally accessible for desktop users. Read more

Linux Foundation and Linux

  • How IoTivity and AllJoyn Could Combine
    At the Embedded Linux Conference in April, Open Connectivity Foundation (OCF) Executive Director Mike Richmond concluded his keynote on the potential for interoperability between the OCF’s IoTivity IoT framework and the AllSeen Alliance’s AllJoyn spec by inviting to the stage Greg Burns, the chief architect of AllJoyn. Burns briefly shared his opinion that not only was there no major technical obstacle to combining these two major open source IoT specs, but that by taking the best of both standards, a hybrid could emerge that improves upon both. Later in the day, Burns gave a technical overview of how such a hybrid could be crafted in “Evolving a Best-of-Breed IoT Framework.” (See video below.) Burns stated in both talks that his opinions in no way reflect the official position of OCF or the AllSeen Alliance. At the time of the ELC talk in April, Burns had recently left his job as VP of Engineering at Qualcomm and Chair of the Technical Steering Committee at the AllSeen Alliance to take on the position of Chief IoT Software Technologist in the Open Source Technology Center at Intel Corp.
  • ​Linus Torvalds' love-hate relationship with the GPL
    Linux's founder appreciates what the GNU General Public License has given Linux, but he doesn't appreciate how some open-source lawyers are trying to enforce it in court.
  • Linus Torvalds reflects on 25 years of Linux
    LinuxCon North America concluded in Toronto, Canada on August 25th, the day Linux was celebrating its 25th anniversary. Linus Torvalds, the creator of Linux, and Dirk Hohndel, VP and chief of open source at VMware, sat down for a conversation at the event and reflected upon the past 25 years. Here are some of the highlights of that conversation.
  • 6 things you should know from Linux's first 25 years
    Red Hat was founded in 1993, two years after Linux was announced and the company has been one of the top contributors to Linux. There is a symbiotic relationship between the company and the project. Whitehurst pointed out that it’s hard to talk about the history of Red Hat without talking about Linux and vice versa.
  • There Is Talk Of Resuming OpenChrome VIA KMS/DRM Driver Development
    Two or so years back or so it was looking hopeful that the mainline Linux kernel would finally have a proper VIA DRM/KMS driver for the unfortunate ones still have VIA x86 hardware and using the integrated graphics. However, that work was ultimately abandoned but there is talk of it being restored.

Security News

  • New FairWare Ransomware targeting Linux Computers [Ed: probably just a side effect of keeping servers unpatched]
    A new attack called FaireWare Ransomware is targeting Linux users where the attackers hack a Linux server, delete the web folder, and then demand a ransom payment of two bitcoins to get their files back. In this attack, the attackers most likely do not encrypt the files, and if they do retain the files, probably just upload it to a server under their control.
  • How do we explain email to an "expert"?
    This has been a pretty wild week, more wild than usual I think we can all agree. The topic I found the most interesting wasn't about one of the countless 0day flaws, it was a story from Slate titled: In Praise of the Private Email Server The TL;DR says running your own email server is a great idea. Almost everyone came out proclaiming it a terrible idea. I agree it's a terrible idea, but this also got me thinking. How do you explain this to someone who doesn't really understand what's going on? There are three primary groups of people. 1) People who know they know nothing 2) People who think they're experts 3) People who are actually experts
  • Why the term “zero day” needs to be in your brand’s cybersecurity vocabulary
    Linux is “open source” which means anyone can look at the code and point out flaws. In that sense, I’d say Linus Torvalds doesn’t have to be as omniscient as Tim Cook. Linux source code isn’t hidden behind closed doors. My understanding is, all the Linux code is out there for anyone to see, naked for anyone to scrutinize, which is why certain countries feel safer using it–there’s no hidden agenda or secret “back door” lurking in the shadows. Does that mean Android phones are safer? That’s up for debate.