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Ubuntu

Ubuntu: Ubuntu 16.10 EoL, Snaps, Juju, Ubuntu Podcast, Ubuntu Fridge, and ROS

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Ubuntu
  • Ubuntu 16.10 (Yakkety Yak) End of Life reached on July 20 2017
  • Ubuntu 16.10 reaches end of life

    If you are still running Ubuntu 16.10, which was released last October, it’s time to upgrade. Also known as 'Yakkety Yak', it was released on October 13, 2016, and as per short-term release lifespans, has petered out its nine-month support cycle. If you’re still running 16.10, then it’s time to upgrade to Ubuntu 17.04 which will be supported until the start of 2018.

  • Ubuntu 16.10 (Yakkety Yak) Is No Longer Supported, Upgrade to Ubuntu 17.04 Now

    Today, July 20, 2017, is the last day when the Ubuntu 16.10 (Yakkety Yak) was supported by Canonical as the operating system now reached end of life, and it will no longer receive security and software updates.

    Dubbed by Canonical and Ubuntu founder Mark Shuttleworth as the Yakkety Yak, Ubuntu 16.10 was launched on October 13, 2016, and it was a short-lived release that only received nine (9) months of support through kernel updates, bug fixes, and security patches for various components.

  • Clarification: Snappy and Flatpak

    Recently, I posted a piece about distributions consolidating around a consistent app store. In it I mentioned Flatpak as a potential component and some people wondered why I didn’t recommend Snappy, particularly due to my Canonical heritage.

    To be clear (and to clear up my in-articulation): I am a fan of both Snappy and Flatpak: they are both important technologies solving important problems and they are both driven by great teams. To be frank, my main interest and focus in my post was the notion of a consolidated app store platform as opposed to what the specific individual components would be (other people can make a better judgement call on that). Thus, please don’t read my single-line mention of Flatpak as any criticism of Snappy. I realize that this may have been misconstrued as me suggesting that Snappy is somehow not up to the job, which was absolutely not my intent.

  • Testing the future of Juju with snaps

    Juju 2.3 is under heavy development, and one thing we all want when we're working on the next big release of our software product is to get feedback from users. Are you solving the problems your user has? Are there bugs in the corner cases that a user can find before the release? Are the performance improvements you made working for everyone like you expect? The more folks that test the software before it's out, the better off your software will be!

  • S10E20 – Wry Mindless Ice

    It’s Season Ten Episode Twenty of the Ubuntu Podcast! Alan Pope, Mark Johnson and Martin Wimpress are connected and speaking to your brain.

  • The Fridge: Ubuntu Weekly Newsletter Issue 513
  • Robot development made easy with Husarion CORE2-ROS & Ubuntu – part 2

Support for Ubuntu 16.10 Ends Today

Filed under
Ubuntu

Yup, Ubuntu 16.10 Yakkety Yak hit end of life (EOL) on July 20.

Released on October 13, 2016, Ubuntu 16.10 is a short-term release with a 9-month support cycle.

That support period is at an end and Ubuntu 16.10 will reach end of life on Thursday, July 20, 2017.

Read more

Netrunner Rolling and Ubuntu Upgrades

Filed under
GNU
Linux
Ubuntu
  • Netrunner Rolling Is Back After One and a Half Years, It's Based on Arch Linux

    After one and a half years of silence, the Netrunner Rolling series make a comeback today with the release of version 2017.07, based on Arch Linux and Manjaro operating systems.

    By our count, Netrunner Rolling 2017.07 is here sixteen months after the Netrunner Rolling 2016.01 release, which was unveiled on February 27, 2016, and it's an up-to-date version with all the latest GNU/Linux technologies. The good news is that it's here to stay, and will receive regular updates 3 or 4 for times a year.

  • Clarification and changes to release upgrades

    I’ve recently made some changes to how do-release-upgrade, called by update-manager when you choose to upgrade releases, behaves and thought it’d be a good time to clarify how things work and the changes made.

    When do-release-upgrade is called it reads a meta-release file from changelogs.ubuntu.com to determine what releases are supported and to which release to upgrade. The exact meta-release file changes depending on what arguments, –proposed or –devel-release, are passed to do-release-upgrade. The meta-release file is used to determine which tarball to download and use to actually perform the upgrade. So if you are upgrading from Ubuntu 17.04 to Artful then you are actually using the the ubuntu-release-upgrader code from Artful.

Ubuntu: Ubuntu Upgrades, LXC/LXD, End of Support for Ubuntu 16.10, and More

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Ubuntu
  • “Don’t run this on any system you expect to be up” they said, but we did it anyway

    This is the story of how we upgraded over 2000 Ubuntu production servers – turning over millions an hour – by installing the operating system in memory, wiping the root disk and reinstalling the OS back on disk from RAM. We did it, there was zero data loss and it saved us lots of time and money in support. It also took months of careful planning and many many tests.

  • Condensing Your Infrastructure with System Containers

    When most people hear the word containers, they probably think of Docker containers, which are application containers. But, there are other kinds of containers, for example, system containers like LXC/LXD. Stéphane Graber, technical lead for LXD at Canonical Ltd., will be delivering two talks at the upcoming Open Source Summit NA in September: “GPU, USB, NICs and Other Physical Devices in Your Containers” and “Condensing Your Infrastructure Using System Containers” discussing containers in detail.  

    In this OS Summit preview, we talked with Graber to understand the difference between system and application containers as well as how to work with physical devices in containers.

  • Support for Ubuntu 16.10 Ends Tomorrow

    It’s almost time to bid bon-voyage to one of the most boring exciting releases of Ubuntu there’s ever been. Yup, Ubuntu 16.10 Yakkety Yak hits end of life (EOL) tomorrow, July 20. Released on October 13, 2016, Ubuntu 16.10 is a short-term releases with a 9-month support cycle.

  • Ubuntu Artful Desktop July Shakedown – call for testing

    We’re mid-way through the Ubuntu Artful development cycle, with the 17.10 release rapidly approaching on the horizon.

  • Atom Text Editor Can Now Be Installed Using Snapd in Ubuntu

    Atom is an open-source and free text/source code editor for Linux, Mac and Windows developed by GitHub, written in Node.js and embedded Git control. Atom is based on Electron and built using web technologies (HTML, JavaScript, CSS, and Node.js integration.). It is known as hackable text editor because it can be deeply customized and its functionality can be extended using packages built and maintained by community. It can also be used as an integrated development environment (IDE).

  • WeChat Is Now Available As Snap For Ubuntu 16.04+

    WeChat is a free messaging service, it's initial release was back in 2011 and by 2017 it was one of the largest standalone messaging service by monthly active users. It has applications for all platforms Windows, Mac, Android, iOS, and Linux. The Linux version of the application is based on electron and available as snap package for Ubuntu versions. This desktop version allows you to chat and share files just like you can on the mobile versions.

Ubuntu 17.10 May Make It Easier to Connect to Free Wifi and Improved GUI

Filed under
GNOME
Ubuntu
  • Ubuntu 17.10 May Make It Easier to Connect to Free Wifi

    Connecting to free wifi hotspots might be easier Ubuntu 17.10 — something I personally will appreciate!

    I work out of a coffee shop¹ during the week and their free wifi, while not perfect, is decent enough to feed this hungry blog on.

    But Ubuntu has issues trying to connect to the wifi because it uses a captive portal for authentication.

  • GNOME Devs Debut Improved Wi-Fi Settings Panel

    Improved wifi settings are coming as part a redesigned GNOME Control Center. And as you can see in this video, the new wifi panel is looking seriously good.

UBports Working Lately on Ubuntu Touch Port for Nexus 5, Based on Ubuntu 16.04

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Ubuntu

UBports announced today on Twitter that they managed to successfully run their modification of Canonical's deprecated Ubuntu Touch mobile operating system on the Nexus 5 smartphone.

Read more

Ubuntu 17.10 (Artful Aardvark) Needs Some Testing, Here's How You Can Help

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Ubuntu

Canonical's Alan Pope invites the Ubuntu community today to download and test out the latest daily build ISO images of the upcoming Ubuntu 17.10 (Artful Aardvark) operating system to report if things are working correctly or not on their PCs.

Read more

Ubuntu’s Impact on Software Naming Conventions and Testing of Artful Aardvark

Filed under
Ubuntu
  • Coincidence or Subtle Influence? Ubuntu’s Impact on Software Naming Conventions

    Could Ubuntu have had an impact on the versioning and naming conventions of other software projects, including Windows, Android and more?

    Reader Abu A. pinged us earlier today to share this interesting insight he has on Ubuntu’s contributions to the wider software community.

  • The Artful Aardvark Needs You!

    I don’t consider myself to be psychic and yet, somehow, miraculously, I happen to know what you’re going to be doing later.

    You’re going to help test the Ubuntu 17.10 daily builds on real hardware to uncover unwanted behaviour in user-facing features.

Ubuntu Desktop Testing, Ubuntu Server Development

Filed under
Ubuntu

Ubuntu Linux and Husarion's CORE2-ROS Make Robot Development Easy and Fun

Filed under
Hardware
Ubuntu

Building robots is a challenging task, even for Husarion, a robotic company known for creating a rapid development platform for robots called CORE2-ROS, which, in combination with the popular Ubuntu OS, makes robot development easy and fun.

Husarion's Dominik Nowak explains in a recent blog article how CORE2, the company's second generation robotics controller, and their cloud platform that helps them manage all CORE2-based robots assists those interested in creating robots, using only an SBC (single-board computer) like Raspberry Pi with Ubuntu Linux pre-installed and a real-time microcontroller board.

"Building robots is a challenging task that the Husarion team is trying to make easier," said Dominik Nowak, CEO at Husarion. "CORE2 combines a real-time microcontroller board and a single board computer running Ubuntu. Ubuntu is the most popular Linux distribution not only for desktops but also for embedded hardware in IoT & robotics applications."

Read more

Also Linux/Ubuntu-based: Review: Flying the super-small, super-fun DJI Spark

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