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Ubuntu Exodus

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Ubuntu
  • Ubuntu Exodus, Tumbleweed a Day, Open Source Notebook

    Two long-time Ubuntu developers have given their notice. It's probably just a coincidence, but if more leave it could only be bad news. Elsewhere, Tumbleweed has seen five releases in as many days and CoreOS has changed its name. Bash got a new logo and blogger DarkDuck said Zorin OS 12 is a diamond in the rough.

  • Taking a break

    It’s a bit strange to write this blog post in the same week as Martin Pitt is announcing moving on from Canonical. I remember many moments of Martin’s post very vividly and he was one of the first I ran into on my flight to Sydney for Ubuntu Down Under in 2005.

  • The alphabet and pitti end here: Last day at Canonical

Canonical Brain Drain

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Ubuntu
  • Longtime Ubuntu Developer Martin Pitt Leaving Canonical, Joining Red Hat
  • Another Veteran Ubuntu Member Is Leaving Canonical

    Well, this is a bit strange and hopefully just developers looking to recharge and find new endeavors for 2017 as opposed to any exodus, but just hours after writing about Martin Pitt leaving Canonical to join Red Hat, another longtime Ubuntu developer is leaving the company too.

    Martin Pitt had been at Canonical for 12.5 years while the other developer leaving was there for 11 years: Daniel Holbach. Daniel had been with Canonical since 2005 and served as a developer on the desktop team, founded Ubuntu's community teams, and then in the past few years had been working in community management and related community/relations areas.

Canonical's Snapd 2.19 Snappy Daemon Launches for Ubuntu Core 16 & Ubuntu 16.04

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Ubuntu

Canonical's Michael Vogt announced the release and general availability of the Snapd 2.19 Snappy daemon for Ubuntu Core 16, Ubuntu 16.10 (Yakkety Yak), and Ubuntu 16.04 LTS (Xenial Xerus) operating systems.

Snapd 2.19 is here almost three weeks after the release of Snapd 2.18 and only one week after its first maintenance update, version 2.18.1. According to the release notes, which we've attached at the end of the article for your reading pleasure, Snapd 2.19 is a major update implementing numerous improvements and new features.

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Also: Preview Linux Mint 18.1 (Serena) new features

Make Ubuntu Work Like ChromeOS

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OS
Ubuntu

It might surprise some of you that with a little effort, you can make Ubuntu work like ChromeOS. Best of all, you can do so and still keep Ubuntu's advantages. In this article, I'll share some tips and thoughts on how you can run Ubuntu with similar features to those found in ChromeOS.

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Devs Plan ‘Ultra Minimal’ Version of Ubuntu Budgie

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Ubuntu

You know I love a good tease, and the Ubuntu Budgie team have done just that.

Ubuntu Budgie tweets that it is testing an “ultra minimal version” of the spin which ‘uses 220MB or less of RAM’.

Intriguing.

The minimal spin is being pitched at users “who love customising their distro” and is unlikely to ship with much of anything pre-installed.

The team has shared precious little else about this nimble version but, assuming their claim is true, it could find itself pitched as a contender to other “lightweight” Linux distributions. The Budgie desktop the distro is based around is already fairly light compared to other modern desktop environments.

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Leftovers: Ubuntu

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Ubuntu
  • The 6 Biggest Ubuntu News Stories of 2016

    What a year it’s been — and I’m only talking about Linux, open source and related communities!

    2016 has been a pretty knock-out year for Linux. In this post we highlight 6 news stories from the past twelve months that relate specifically

    Ubuntu fans have had it especially cushy this year, with 2016 gifting not 1 but 2 convergent devices: a high-end Ubuntu Phone, and a mid-range Ubuntu tablet. This year was also host to a rock solid, super dependable LTS release in the form of Ubuntu 16.04 LTS, and a forward-looking short-term release in Ubuntu 16.10.

  • System 76 Talks With Ubuntu, WordPress Ups Game and More…

    This week we learned that Canonical has been working with another company that’s not located anywhere near Redmond for a change. Denver based System 76, the OEM that’s built it’s reputation marketing desktops and laptops preloaded with Linux, has been talking with Canonical to help developers at Ubuntu up their game on the desktop front. To be more specific, the two have been working together to increase HiDPI (High Dots Per Inch) support in Unity 7.

  • System76 Working with Canonical on Improving HiDPI Support in Ubuntu

    Last week System76 engineers participated in a call with Martin Wimpress of the Ubuntu Desktop team to discuss HiDPI support in Ubuntu, specifically Unity 7. HiDPI support exists in Unity 7, but there are areas that could use improvement, and the call focused around those. The conversation was primarily focused around bugs that still remain in the out-of-the-box HiDPI experience; specifically around enabling automatic scaling and Ubuntu recognizing when a HiDPI display is present so that it can adjust accordingly.

  • The Wait Is Almost Over: KDE Plasma 5.8 LTS Is Coming to Kubuntu, Linux Mint KDE

    Today, December 11, 2016, the Kubuntu and Linux Mint developers were proud to announce the availability of the KDE Plasma 5.8 LTS desktop environment in the Kubuntu Backports Landing PPA repository.

    It's been a long time coming, but Kubuntu 16.04.1 LTS (Xenial Xerus) and Kubuntu 16.10 (Yakkety Yak) users will soon be able to update their beloved KDE Plasma 5 desktop environment to the latest, long-term supported KDE Plasma 5.8 release. The KDE Frameworks 5.28.0 and KDE Applications 16.04.3 software suite are available as well, and these KDE technologies are also available for Linux Mint 18 "Sarah" KDE users.

  • Ubuntu-Based KDE Neon User LTS Edition Distro Out Now with KDE Plasma 5.8 LTS

    The development team behind the KDE Neon GNU/Linux distribution have announced the availability of an LTS (Long Term Support) flavor of the KDE Neon User Edition operating system.

    As you might know, KDE Neon is usually distributed as User Edition and Developer Edition 64-bit Live ISO images. While the former is shipping with the latest stable KDE Plasma, Frameworks, and Applications releases, the latter is targeted at developers and bleeding-edge users who want to test drive the pre-release versions of these technologies.

  • Cinnamon 3.2.4 Desktop Environment Lands with Support for Rhythmbox, MATE Panel

    A new maintenance update of the Cinnamon 3.2 desktop environment has arrived this weekend, versioned 3.2.4, for the upcoming Linux Mint 18.1 "Serena" operating system, but also for users of Linux Mint 18 "Sarah."

    Cinnamon 3.2.4 is now the latest stable release of the acclaimed desktop environment for GNU/Linux distributions, and lands approximately three weeks after the Cinnamon 3.2.2 update, and one day after the announcement of Cinnamon 3.2.3, which was a major version adding numerous improvements, new features, and bug fixes.

  • Making System Settings Access a Cross-Desktop Feature

    Corentin Noël has proposed a cross-desktop URL scheme specification for system settings and we’re excited to announce the first release of Switchboard (the system settings app in elementary OS) that makes use of it!

  • Ubuntu Budgie Minimal Edition Coming Soon for Those Who Love Customizing the OS

    We haven't heard anything from the Ubuntu Budgie team since their beloved Linux-based operating system built around the Budgie desktop environment was accepted by Canonical as an official Ubuntu flavor.

    However, we're aware of the fact that the Ubuntu Budgie team have a lot of work on their hands re-branding the entire project from the old name (budgie-remix) to the new one, and we can all agree it's a huge effort. Also, they're preparing for the distribution's first release as an official Ubuntu flavor, as part of Ubuntu 17.04 (Zesty Zapus).

    The first development snapshot of Ubuntu Budgie 17.04 might land later this month, on December 29, when some of the opt-in flavors will participate in the Alpha 1 release. Until then, it looks like the team is working on an ultra minimal version of Ubuntu Budgie, for those who love customizing their installations.

Ubuntu 17.04 | Release Date & New Features

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Ubuntu

Following the release of Ubuntu 16.10, Canonical is gearing up for the release of the next iteration of the world’s most popular open-source operating system, i.e., Ubuntu 17.04. This release is codenamed Zesty Zapus after a jumping mouse found in the North American region. While Zapus stands for the genus name of a mouse, Zesty is an adjective for ‘great enthusiasm and energy.’

As the name suggests, this next short-term release will arrive in the month of April. If you’re an avid Ubuntu user, you must be knowing the significance of .04 in 17.04.

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Debian and Ubuntu News

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Debian
Ubuntu

Canonical Outs Live Patch Kernel Update for Ubuntu 16.04 to Patch Security Flaws

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Security
Ubuntu

Just one day after announcing the availability of new kernel versions for all of its supported Ubuntu Linux operating systems, Canonical published a new kernel live patch security notice for Ubuntu 16.04 LTS (Xenial Xerus).

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Ubuntu Core has the keys to IoT security

Filed under
Security
Ubuntu

In October, a DDoS attack on Dyn's infrastructure took down a big chunk of the internet, making sites like Amazon and Twitter inaccessible. It was the first major attack involving IoT (internet of things) devices. Fortunately, it was also a benign attack: no one got hurt, no one died.

However, the next attack could be catastrophic. No one knows when it will happen. No one knows the magnitude.

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UKSM Is Still Around For Data Deduplication Of The Linux Kernel

Several years back we wrote about Ultra Kernel Samepage Merging (UKSM) for data de-duplication within the Linux kernel for transparently scanning all application memory and de-duping it where possible. While the original developer is no longer active, a new developer has been maintaining the work and continues to support it on the latest Linux kernel releases. Read more

Why Dell’s gamble on Linux laptops has paid off

The whole juggernaut that is now Linux on Dell started as the brainchild of two core individuals, Barton George (Senior Principal Engineer) and Jared Dominguez (OS Architect and Linux Engineer). It was their vision that began it all back in 2012. It was long hours, uncertain futures and sheer belief that people really did want Linux laptops that sustained them. Here is the untold story of how Dell gained the top spot in preinstalled Linux on laptops. Where do you start when no one has ever really even touched such a concept? The duo did have some experience of the area before. George explained that the XPS and M3800 Linux developer’s laptops weren’t Dell’s first foray into Linux laptops. Those with long memories may remember Dell testing the waters for a brief while by having a Linux offering alongside Windows laptops. By their own admission it didn’t work out. “We misread the market,” commented George. Read more Also: New Entroware Aether Laptop for Linux Powered with Ubuntu

A Short MATE Desktop 1.17 Review in February 2017

MATE 1.17 is a testing release, it has no official announcement like 1.16 stable release (odd = unstable, even = stable). But what made me interested is because Ubuntu MATE 17.04 includes it by default so I write this short review. The most fundamental news is about MATE Desktop is now completely ported to GTK+3 leaving behind GTK+2. You may be interested seeing few changes and I have tried Ubuntu MATE 17.04 Alpha 2 to review MATE 1.17 below. Enjoy MATE 1.17! Read more Also: What's up with the hate towards Freedesktop?