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Review: Gatter Linux 0.8

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Reviews
Ubuntu

Gatter Linux is an Ubuntu-based distribution which features the Openbox window manager as the default user interface. The project claims to be developing a desktop operating system which is user friendly: "For people who want switch from Windows to [the] Linux world and for people who want [a] lightweight operation system and also fully functional." I could find very little other information on the distribution on its website.

The latest release of Gatter Linux is version 0.8 and it is based on Ubuntu 16.04 LTS. The distribution is available in one edition for 64-bit x86 computers. The ISO the project provides is approximately 830MB in size. Booting from this disc brings up a menu asking if we would like to boot into a live desktop environment, boot a live desktop displayed in safe graphics mode, or launch the project's system installer. Taking the live desktop option brings us to a graphical login screen where we can sign into the default account if we have the right password. I did not find any reference to a password on the project's website, but quickly got signed in by guessing the password "gatter".

The live disc features the Openbox window manager. Openbox has been set up with a fairly sparse layout. There is a panel placed at the top of the screen which shows four unlabeled buttons and a system tray. I soon found the four blank buttons are actually a virtual desktop switcher that lets us switch between workspaces. The theme is dark and minimal.

When we sign in a welcome window appears. This welcome screen features launchers which can open configuration tools. One button launches an application which will switch our keyboard's layout, another button opens a third-party driver manager, a third tool helps us set our time zone. One button marked Gatter Settings opens up a panel with options for changing the appearance of the Openbox environment. Another button is labelled Gatter Software. This button opens a terminal window and displays a menu of possible package-related actions such as updating the system, cleaning the package cache or performing a "dist upgrade".

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Intel's Microcode Update for Spectre Makes a Comeback in Ubuntu's Repositories

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Security
Ubuntu

After it's been pulled from Ubuntu's repositories in late January at Intel's request due to serious hardware issues reported by numerous users, Inte's microcode update to mitigate the Spectre security vulnerability makes a comeback.

On January 22, 2018, Canonical replaced the Intel microcode firmware versioned 20180108 with the older 20170707 release at Intel's request, thus no longer protecting users' computers against the Spectre security vulnerability that could allow a local attacker to expose sensitive information from kernel memory.

"Jann Horn discovered that microprocessors utilizing speculative execution and branch prediction may allow unauthorized memory reads via side-channel attacks. This flaw is known as Spectre. A local attacker could use this to expose sensitive information, including kernel memory (CVE-2017-5715)," reads the security advisory.

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Also: Finally extradited from Europe, suspected LinkedIn [cracker] faces US charges

Ubuntu: 7 Reasons to Upgrade to Ubuntu 18.04 LTS, Ubuntu Podcast and Snaps

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Ubuntu

How to install and use Gitkraken on Ubuntu with snap

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Ubuntu
HowTos

If you're a developer, you know Git. Most likely, you use Git on a regular basis. And you probably know Linux as well. In fact, you probably develop with Linux (as Linux is one of the most popular development platforms in the world). If you're a Git user on Linux, you might be using the command line to interact with the service.

However if you could have an outstanding GUI tool for that purpose, you'd probably use it to make your work a bit more efficient. One such tool is the cross platform Gitkraken. With Gitkraken you can easily interact with your Git account, without having to use the command line.

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You Can Now Install Ubuntu 18.04 LTS on Your Raspberry Pi 3 Model B+ with RaspEX

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Linux
Ubuntu

RaspEX developer Arne Exton released today a new version of its Linux distro for Raspberry Pi SBCs (single-board computers) with support for Raspberry Pi Foundation's recently announced Raspberry Pi 3 Model B+, which features a faster 1.4GHz 64-bit quad-core ARM Cortex-A53 CPU, dual-band 802.11ac wireless, and Gigabit Ethernet.

Under the hood, the developer rebased the kernel on Linux 4.14.30 LTS with support for Raspberry Pi 3 Model B+'s hardware, as well as the base system on the Ubuntu 18.04 LTS operating system, though some packages are borrowed from Debian GNU/Linux 9 "Stretch" and Linaro software for ARM SoCs.

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Ubuntu: Design and Web, LXD, Ubuntu Budgie Review and Mintbox Mini 2

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Ubuntu
  • Design and Web team summary – 27 March 2018

    The design and web team work on a wide array of projects throughout Canonical. Therefore, we are split into seven squads to handle different aspects of the company. Here is a rundown of the work we completed this week by squad.

  • LXD weekly status #40

    We also made good progress replacing the command line parser in LXD, finishing the port of the lxd command line tool with only lxc left to port at this point.

    Remote copy and move of storage volume was completed and merged in LXD, as was the addition of a new lifecycle event class and a number of improvements to the clustering code.

  • Ubuntu Budgie Review – For The Record

    Ubuntu Budgie Review. On today’s For The Record, I provide a tour of Ubuntu Budgie. For those who aren’t aware, the Budgie desktop is the flagship desktop environment for a Linux distro called Solus.

  • Mintbox Mini 2 Compact Linux Mini PC

    Linux Mint has this week unveiled a new Linux compact mini PC they have created in the form of the new Mintbox Mini 2, which comes equipped with an Apollo Lake quad-core CPU and is expected to be available during the summer months of 2018 with prices starting from $299.

Debian and Ubuntu

Filed under
Debian
Ubuntu
  • Slax 9.4 Released With Updated Debian Packages, One-Click-To-Install Launchers

    Following the very short RC period, the lightweight Slax 9.4 distribution is now available.

    Since being revived last year as a lightweight Linux distribution now based on Debian rather than Slackware and shifting to Fluxbox and Compton for its desktop stack, the 9.4 release continues pulls in the latest Debian stable package updates.

  • Ubuntu 18.04 LTS Release Date and New Features

    Ubuntu 18.04 is codenamed Bionic Beaver. This is not surprising considering the logic behind the codename and versioning of Ubuntu releases.

  • Latest MintBox miniPC advances to Apollo Lake based FitLet2 foundation

    The Linux Mint project unveiled a “MintBox Mini 2” mini-PC with Linux Mint 19 preloaded on a Compulab Fitlet2 with a quad-core Celeron J3455, up to 8GB RAM and 120GB SSD, dual GbE, wireless, and mini-DP.

  • Linux Mint Announces New MintBox Mini 2, Mozilla Plans to Add Ad Blocking to Firefox, Slax New Version and More

    Linux Mint recently announced the new MintBox Mini 2. The new Mini is "just as small as the original MintBox Mini and the MintBox Mini Pro but with much better specifications, better performance and a few more features". The new Mini 2 has an Intel 8260 chipset, which provides WiFi 802.11ac and Bluetooth 4.2. You can upgrade the RAM to 16GB, and the device is easy to open. The front has two USB 3.0 ports, audio and micro jacks and a microSD slot, as well as two LEDs. The MintBox Mini 2 will be around the same price as the original MintBox Mini and is expected to be available worldwide in June 2018.

LOL! Google Thinks Arch Linux is Based on Ubuntu

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GNU
Linux
Ubuntu

Search ‘Ubuntu based distros’ on Google and laugh at the recommendations as Google shows Arch, Debian etc in the search result.

Ubuntu is based on Debian. Debian is not based on other distribution. Arch Linux is a distribution independent of Debian or any other Linux distribution.

This is what every Linux user already knows.

But not Google, apparently.

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System76 Adds Nvidia Titan V GPU Support to Its Ubuntu-Based Pop!_OS Linux OS

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OS
Ubuntu

The company is currently working hard on Pop!_OS Linux 18.04, a release that's based on Canonical's upcoming Ubuntu 18.04 LTS (Bionic Beaver) operating system and built around the GNOME desktop environment. One essential feature of the next Pop!_OS Linux release appears to be support for Nvidia's Titan V GPUs.

"We now have support for the NVIDIA Titan V, one of the most powerful GPUs on the market today! One of the value adds we do as a company is the ability to quickly incorporate support for new hardware. It’s available in our latest ISO if you want to check it out," said System76 in their latest blog announcement.

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Here's everything new coming to Ubuntu 18.04 LTS

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Ubuntu

Ubuntu 18.04 LTS release date, new features, upgrade procedure and everything important associated with it.
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More in Tux Machines

Suitcase Computer Reborn with Raspberry Pi Inside

Fun fact, the Osborne 1 debuted with a price tag equivalent to about $5,000 in today’s value. With a gigantic 9″ screen and twin floppy drives (for making mix tapes, right?) the real miracle of the machine was its portability, something unheard of at the time. The retrocomputing trend is to lovingly and carefully restore these old machines to their former glory, regardless of how clunky or underpowered they are by modern standards. But sometimes they can’t be saved yet it’s still possible to gut and rebuild the machine with modern hardware, like with this Raspberry Pi used to revive an Osborne 1. Purists will turn their nose up at this one, and we admit that this one feels a little like “restoring” radios from the 30s by chucking out the original chassis and throwing in a streaming player. But [koff1979] went to a lot of effort to keep the original Osborne look and feel in the final product. We imagine that with the original guts replaced by a Pi and a small LCD display taking the place of the 80 character by 24 line CRT, the machine is less strain on the shoulder when carrying it around. (We hear the original Osborne 1 was portable in the same way that an anvil is technically portable.) The Pi runs an emulator to get the original CP/M experience; it even runs Wordstar. The tricky part about this build was making the original keyboard talk to the Pi, which was accomplished with an Arduino that translates key presses to USB. Read more

FOSS FUD From EFF and Black Duck

Posts From MiniDebConf Hamburg 2018

  • Debian is wrong
    So, the MiniDebConf Hamburg 2018 is about to end, it's sunny, no clouds are visible and people seem to be happy. And, I have time to write this blog post! So, just as a teaser for now, I'll present to you the content of some slides of our "Reproducible Buster" talk today. Later I will add links to the video and the full slides.
  • Mini DebConf Hamburg
    Since Friday around noon time, I and my 6-year-old son are at the Mini DebConf in Hamburg. Attending together with my son is quite a different experience than plain alone or with also having my wife around. Though he is doing pretty good, it mostly means the day ends for me around 2100 when he needs to go to sleep.

today's howtos