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Ubuntu

Why You Should Use Ubuntu LTS

Filed under
Ubuntu

One of the most common issues I see among newer Linux users is the desire to upgrade their distribution needlessly to a new bleeding-edge version. This is especially true with those who use Ubuntu and its derivatives. In this article, I'll explain why most people would be much better off sticking to stable distribution releases that have been "in the wild" for six months or longer.

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Snappy vs flatpak

Filed under
Red Hat
Ubuntu
  • Snappy vs flatpak

    There is fierce debate brewing in the Linux community right now. Here we have two rival formats for packaging software. which one will be victorious and become the standard across all Linux desktops ? The answer in our opinion is that both will find a strong following for various reasons. Both will serve the common user, but one will reign supreme for industrial use. From as security viewpoint, at least for now, Flatpak has the advantage.

  • Linux Snap Package Format Goes Multi-Distro

    Snapcraft -- the Linux package format Canonical developed for Ubuntu -- now works on multiple Linux distros, including Arch, Debian, Fedora and various flavors of Ubuntu, Canonical announced last week.

    They're being validated on CentOS, Elementary, Gentoo, Mint, OpenSUSE, OpenWrt and RHEL.

    "Distributing applications on Linux is not always easy," said Canonical's Manik Taneja, product manager for Snappy Ubuntu Core.

  • Goodbye to other packages (rpm & deb), Say Hello to Snaps

    Multiple Linux distributions and companies announced collaboration on the “snap” universal Linux package format, enabling a single binary package to work perfectly and securely on any Linux desktop, server, cloud or device.

Software radio apps are open-source on Ubuntu App Store

Filed under
Ubuntu

Lime Micro (London, UK) has announced that Ubuntu is putting together an App Store for LimeSDR that can be accessed once the LimeSDR crowd funding campaign successfully reaches its $500,000 pledge goal. The Snappy Ubuntu App Store will ensure the software defined radio (SDR) apps developed with the LimeSDR board are downloadable and those developed by Lime remain completely open-sourced.

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Peppermint 7 Could Land on June 30, Will Be an LTS Release Based on Ubuntu 16.04

Filed under
GNU
Linux
Ubuntu

In a brief Google+ announcement, the Peppermint OS developers have informed the community about the possible upcoming availability of the Peppermint 7 Linux operating system.

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Ubuntu phone is not yet ready for prime time

Filed under
Ubuntu

Phones that run Canonical's Ubuntu Phone operating system have been around for more than a year but given that they appear to be predominantly aimed at European markets, they are a rare sight in Australia.

One cannot blame Canonical, the company behind the phone, for Australia is a very small market and one that tends to follow American trends.

The first Ubuntu phones were released in February 2015 and came in for some criticism because they were under-powered, being a modified version of the Aquaris E4.5. With a 4.5-inch, 540x960 resolution display, a 1.3GHz quad-core MediaTek Cortex A7 processor, 1GB of RAM and 8GB of internal storage, they were not much to write home about.

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Leftovers: Ubuntu and Debian

Filed under
Debian
Ubuntu
  • New APT signing key for code.liw.fi/debian
  • More work on aptitude

    The last few months have been a bit of a crazy period of ups and downs, with a tempest of events beneath the apparent and deceivingly calm surface waters of being unemployed (still at it).

  • Snaps - A Good Way to Test the Latest Apps

    If you've been following the latest Ubuntu news around the traps, you've probably heard about Canonical's "Snappy" system. We actually did an article on Snappy back in late 2014 when the project had just started to surface. As of the latest Ubuntu 16.04 LTS release, the core program 'snapd' is included out of the box, allowing you to install 'Snaps' right away.

  • Linux App Distribution Gets A Little Easier With 'Snap'
  • Community Appreciation Day

    Today is Ubuntu Community Appreciation Day, but this year I am going to expand my appreciation beyond the boundaries of the Ubuntu Community to include anyone in open source that has impacted my journey in open source.

Leftovers: Ubuntu

Filed under
Ubuntu

Leftovers: Ubuntu

Filed under
Ubuntu
  • Ubuntu: Quick install guide

    Honestly, modern Linux is easier, faster and less hassle to install than any recent release of Windows. That's the truth. No messing with keys, no worrying about activation and no digging out that lost install disc or USB drive.

    The beauty of Linux is that because it's free software anyone can download (or pop in a disc) and start using it. You don't even have to install anything! Linux technology and its free and easy licence means that it can be run straight off a CD or DVD.

  • Canonical Goes Snap Happy, Nextcloud 9 Released & More…

    When karma comes to visit, the one thing to remember is that in some way — which might even seem totally unrelated — you have some responsibility for that karmic bite. The best thing to do is to accept it with grace and to move on. I tell you this because that should give you a pretty fair assessment of what my life has been like since the last Week in Review.

    But it hasn’t all been bad karma. There’s been good news on the FOSS front as well…

  • Oh SNAP, and there’s the Devil

    I don’t know how else to put it. I’m sorry. It’s bad. It’s bad in my opinion, not fact. My opinion, is my expectation, will only turn fact by the time it is too late to do anything about it.

    It’s like, “why back-up anything?” — well, you’ll know when you’ve lost everything. In other words, when it is just slightly beyond way too fucking late.

  • Snappy Moves to New Platforms

    Canonical's Snappy package manager is taking its first steps outside the Ubuntu world. As of now, you can install it on Arch, Debian, Fedora and several other popular distros. And with developers like Mozilla getting behind it, it could soon become a new "universal standard".

  • Ubuntu’s SNAPS now available to other Linux Distros
  • Canonical and Chef Add DevOps Options with Habitat and Snap Packages

    DockerCon hasn't even started yet, but the channel has already seen two major open source DevOps announcements. Here's an overview of the latest news from Canonical about snap packages and Chef about its new app automation platform, Habitat.

  • App distribution for Linux just got way better

    Ubuntu's "snap" package format now works on a bunch of other popular Linux distros, including Arch, Debian, Fedora, and most of the Ubuntu flavors. It's also coming to CentOS, Mint, OpenSUSE, and even OpenWrt, among others.

  • Goodbye rpm and deb. Hello Snaps!

On Snappy and Flatpak: business as usual in the Canonical propaganda department

Filed under
Ubuntu

You may have read some stuff this week about an application delivery mechanism called Snappy and how it’s going to unite all distributions and kill apt and rpm!

This is, to put it diplomatically, a heaping pile of steaming bullshit. You may not be surprised to learn that said pile has been served by the Canonical press department.

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Entroware Releases Powerful Linux Gaming Laptop with Ubuntu or Ubuntu MATE 16.04

Filed under
Ubuntu

Today, June 16, 2016, Entroware, a British hardware manufacturer known for building laptops with Ubuntu or Ubuntu MATE GNU/Linux operating system pre-installed, had the great pleasure to inform Softpedia about an exciting new product.

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96Boards SBC showcases Mediatek’s deca-core Helio X20

MediaTek launched the fastest open-spec SBC to date with a 96Boards development board that runs Android on its deca-core Cortex-A53 and -A72 Helio X20 SoC. The “Helio X20 Development Board” is MediaTek’s first 96Boards form-factor single-board computer, and the most powerful open-spec hacker SBC to date. Although we’ve seen some fast 64-bit SoCs among 96Boards SBCs, such as the HiKey, based on an octa-core, Cortex-A53 HiSilicon Kirin 6220, the Helio X20 Development Board offers an even more powerful Helio X20 system-on-chip processor. Read more

Red Hat Financial News

Leftovers: OSS and Sharing

  • New projects, security, and more OpenStack news
  • LibreOffice 5.1.4 Released with Over 130 Fixes
    The first release candidate represented 123 fixes. Some include a fix for a crash in Impress when setting a background image. This occurred with several popular formats in Windows and Linux. Caolán McNamara submitted the patches to fix this in the 5.1 and 5.2 branches. David Tardon fixed a bug where certain presentations hung Impress for extended periods to indefinitely by checking for preconditions earlier. Laurent Balland-Poirier submitted the patches to fix a user-defined cell misinterpretation when using semicolon inside quotes.
  • Open source. Open science. Open Ocean. Oceanography for Everyone and the OpenCTD
    Nearly four years ago, Kersey Sturdivant and I launched a bold, ambitious, and, frankly, naive crowdfunding initiative to build the first low-cost, open-source CTD, a core scientific instrument that measures salinity, temperature, and depth in a water column. It was a dream born from the frustration of declining science funding, the expense of scientific equipment, and the promise of the Maker movement. After thousands of hours spent learning the skills necessary to build these devices, hundreds of conversations with experts, collaborators, and potential users around the world, dozens of iterations (some transformed into full prototypes, others that exist solely as software), and one research cruise on Lake Superior to test the housing and depth and temperature probes, the OpenCTD has arrived.
  • RuuviTag Open-Source Bluetooth Internet Of Things Sensor Beacon Hits Kickstarter (video)
  • Retro gaming on open source 2048 console
    Retro gaming in the open source vein could be on the upswing this season. Creoqode is the London-based technology design company behind 2048, the DIY game console with retro-style video games and visuals that is also supposed to help users learn coding.