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Ubuntu

Dell XPS 13 9380 + Intel Core i7 8565U Ubuntu Linux Performance Benchmarks

Filed under
Graphics/Benchmarks
Ubuntu

At the end of January, Dell announced the Dell XPS 13 9380 Developer Edition laptop as an upgraded version of the XPS 9370 with now having Intel Whiskey Lake CPUs and other minor improvements. Over the past two weeks I've been testing out the Dell XPS 9380 with Intel Core i7 8565U processor with 256GB of NVMe SSD storage and 16GB of RAM. Here are benchmarks of the Dell XPS 9380 compared to several other laptops running Ubuntu Linux as well as looking at the system thermal and power consumption among other metrics.

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Also: Ubuntu 18.04.2 LTS Working To Be Released This Week With New Hardware Enablement Stack

Open source project aims to make Ubuntu usable on Arm-powered Windows laptops

Filed under
OSS
Ubuntu

Back in December 2017, Microsoft and Qualcomm announced a partnership to pair Windows 10 and Snapdragon Arm processors for ultra-thin LTE-connected netbooks with a 20+ hour battery life. This Windows-on-Arm initiative has faced several stumbling blocks, with the the first-generation HP Envy x2 and Asus NovaGo criticized for poor performance and app compatibility in Windows 10, due in large part to an inline x86 emulator for apps written for Windows on Intel or AMD processors.

Now, a group of programmers and device hackers are working to bring proper support for Ubuntu to Arm-powered Windows laptops, starting with first-generation Snapdragon 835 systems, like the HP Envy x2 and Asus NovaGo. The aarch64-laptops project on GitHub provides prebuilt images for the aforementioned notebook PCs, as well as the Lenovo Miix 630.

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Ubuntu 14.04 is Reaching the End of Life. Here are Your Options!

Filed under
Ubuntu

Ubuntu 14.04 is reaching its end of lie on April 30, 2019. This means there will be no security updates for Ubuntu 14.04 users beyond this date. Here’s what you can do if you are still using Ubuntu 14.04.
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A Look at Xubuntu 18.04

Filed under
GNU
Linux
Reviews
Ubuntu

I finally got around to looking at Xubuntu 18.04… It’s nice!

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Canonical Apologizes for Boot Failure in Ubuntu 18.10 & 18.04, Fix Available Now

Filed under
Ubuntu

Canonical released a new kernel update for Ubuntu 18.10 (Cosmic Cuttlefish) and Ubuntu 18.04.1 LTS (Bionic Beaver) systems to address a regression introduces by the last kernel security patch.
After patching a nasty Linux kernel regression in the Ubuntu 18.04 LTS operating system series, Canonical now addressed another regression affecting the Linux 4.18 kernel packages of Ubuntu 18.10 and Ubuntu 18.04.1 LTS systems, which was introduced by an important kernel security update released earlier this week.

The kernel security update that Canonical published on February 4th was available for Ubuntu 18.10, Ubuntu 16.0.4 LTS, and Ubuntu 14.04 LTS systems, but only Ubuntu 18.10 machines were affected by a regression that could prevent them from booting when certain graphics chipsets are used.

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Ubuntu 18.04.2 LTS (Bionic Beaver) Delayed for Valentine's Day Due to Boot Error

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Ubuntu

Canonical announced today that the upcoming Ubuntu 18.04.2 LTS (Bionic Beaver) operating system would be delayed for a week, until February 14th, due to a boot error that cannot be fixed in time.

In a mailing list announcement published earlier today, Canonical's Adam Conrad announced that Ubuntu 18.04.2 LTS would be released next week, on Valentine's Day, February 14th, instead of the initial February 7th launch. The cause for the delay appears to be a critical boot error with the Linux 4.18 kernel.

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Also: What’s the OOPS ID?

Ubuntu Preloaded by Zotac and Debian Development Reports

Filed under
Debian
Ubuntu
  • Zotac launches its first five embedded mini-PCs — with Ubuntu

    Zotac unveiled a line of Linux-ready, embedded “ZBox Pro” mini-PCs. The fanless systems include an Apollo Lake based “Pico” ultra-mini-PC plus Braswell and Apollo Lake based “Nano” and Kaby Lake based “QK” models.

    Consumer mini-PC maker Zotac has announced its first line of embedded mini-PCs and the first available with pre-loaded Linux. The Intel-based ZBox Pro series computers are aimed more at light embedded duty such as digital signage than industrial work, and they offer processors and I/O that are very similar to Zotac’s consumer media, desktop replacement, and gaming designs. However, they offer more durable, aluminum cases with extended -20 to 40⁰ to 45⁰ support, depending on the model. They also provide “more controlled tolerances” than Zotac’s consumer mini-PCs, and they offer 5-year longevity support.

  • Debian build helpers: dh dominates

    It's been a while since someone did this. Back in 2009, Joey Hess made a talk at Debconf 9 about debhelper and mentioned in his slides (PDF) that it was used in most Debian packages.

  • Molly de Blanc: Free software activities (January, 2019)

    January was another quiet month for free software. This isn’t to say I wasn’t busy, but merely that there were fewer things going on, with those things being more demanding of my attention. I’m including some more banal activities both to pad out the list, but to also draw some attention to the labor that goes into free software participation.

Safer Way to Run Bleeding Edge Software on Debian and Ubuntu

Filed under
Debian
Ubuntu

You may have noticed that some software in your distribution is not the latest available. Most people are not even aware of this because, often, it’s not an issue. It’s only when you need some very recent features when it becomes an issue. Let’s say your favorite video editor had some code changes that improve rendering time by 20%. That may be something you want.

Long story short, most distributions that are considered “stable” or “long term support” will have (at least partially) older software in their repositories. But “rolling distros” have much newer software included, as they constantly pull in updates from upstream developers. Debian Unstable (codenamed Sid) is such a distribution. With some command-line magic, you can run Debain Sid inside your current installation of Debian Stable or Ubuntu.

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Also: Fresh snaps from January 2019

Ubuntu 14.04 LTS (Trusty Tahr) Reaches End of Life on April 30, 2019

Filed under
Ubuntu

Canonical today reminded Ubuntu 14.04 LTS (Trusty Tahr) users that it would make its commercial Extended Security Maintenance (ESM) offering available series starting May 2019.

Released on April 17, 2014, the Ubuntu 14.04 LTS (Trusty Tahr) operating system series will reach its end of life in about three months from the moment of writing, on April 30, 2019. Ubuntu 14.04 was an LTS (Long Term Support) release, which means that it received software and security updates for five years.

Last year on September 19, Canonical informed Ubuntu 14.04 LTS (Trusty Tahr) users that they would be able to purchase additional support for the operating system through its commercial offering called Extended Security Maintenance (ESM), which proved to be a huge success among Ubuntu 12.04 LTS (Precise Pangolin) users.

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Canonical Releases Important Ubuntu Linux Kernel Security Patches, Update Now

Filed under
Security
Ubuntu

Available for the Ubuntu 18.10 (Cosmic Cuttlefish), Ubuntu 16.04 LTS (Xenial Xerus), and Ubuntu 14.04 LTS (Trusty Tahr) operating system series, the new Linux kernel updates address a total of 12 security issues, one affecting both Ubuntu 18.10 and Ubuntu 16.04 LTS, three affecting Ubuntu 18.10, four affecting Ubuntu 16.04 LTS, and other four affecting Ubuntu 14.04 LTS.

For Ubuntu 18.10 (Cosmic Cuttlefish), the new kernel patch fixes a race condition (CVE-2018-14625) discovered in Linux kernel's vsock address family implementation, a use-after-free vulnerability (CVE-2018-16882) in the KVM implementation, as well as two other flaws found in the crypto subsystem and KVM implementation (CVE-2018-19407 and CVE-2018-19854).

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More in Tux Machines

Linux-powered robot kit aims for sweet spot between pro and kid products

Vincross has launched a Kickstarter campaign for a modular “MIND Kit” robotics kit ranging from $89 for the Linux-driven, quad -A53 compute unit to $799 for a complete kit with servo controller, motors, battery, bases, sensors, lidar, and a mic array. Vincross, which was founded in 2014 by Tsinghua University AI scientist Tianqi Sun, went to Kickstarter last year to launch its six-legged, all-terrain HEXA robot, controlled by a Linux-based MIND SDK. Now, the company has returned with a smarter and more modular MIND Kit robotics kit with an updated MIND 2.0 SDK. The company also announced a $10 funding round led by Lenovo (see farther below). Read more

Android Leftovers

Leftovers: Windows 10 Being Called "Linux" (Again), Linux Foundation Controls TNS, Mozilla Developer Tools and LibreOffice at FOSDEM 2019

  • Next Windows update brings better Linux integration [Ed: Disappointing to see even SJVN calling this "Linux" even though it is not Linux, it's Vista 10 hijacking the brand]
    The Windows 10 April 2019 Update boasts many improvements, not least of which is Windows Subsystem for Linux's new ability to let you access Linux files safely from Windows.
  • The Future of Artificial Intelligence at Scale
    For this week’s episode of the The New Stack Analysts podcast, TNS editorial director Libby Clark and TNS London correspondent Jennifer Riggins sat down (via Zoom) with futurist Martin Ford, author of “Architects of Intelligence: The truth about AI from the people building it,” and Ofer Hermoni, chair of the technical advisory council for The Linux Foundation’s Deep Learning Foundation projects, to talk about the current state of AI, how it will scale, and its consequences.
  • ArcticFox has working DevTools again
    The past release of 27.9.15 ArcticFox has the Developer Tools working again, they were broken previously because of excessive work on Private browsing.
  • FOSDEM 2019 video presentations are online
    LibreOffice developers and other community members were present at FOSDEM 2019, the biggest European meetup of free and open source software developers. Check out the talks that they gave! Click a link to find out more and watch the videos…

Red Hat on Middleware, RHEL AUDITD, and More Security Issues

  • Open Outlook: Middleware (part 1)
    Middleware, both as a term and as a concept, has been around for decades. As a term, like other terms in the Darwinian world of IT jargon, it has followed a typical fashion lifecycle and is perhaps somewhat past its apogee of vogue. As a concept, however, middleware is more relevant than ever, and while a memetic new label hasn't quite displaced the traditional term, the capabilities themselves are still very much at the heart of enterprise application development. Middleware is about making both developers and operators more productive. Analogous to standardized, widely-used, proven subassemblies in the manufacture of physical goods such as cars, middleware relieves developers from "reinventing the wheel" so that they can compose and innovate at higher levels of abstraction. For the staff responsible for operating applications in production, at scale, with high reliability and performance, the more such applications use standardized middleware components and services, the more efficient and reliable the running of the application can be.
  • RHEL AUDITD
  • Security updates for Tuesday