Language Selection

English French German Italian Portuguese Spanish

Ubuntu

Community backed Kaby Lake SBC ships with downloadable Ubuntu image

Filed under
Hardware
Ubuntu

DFRobot has fulfilled KS orders for its Kaby Lake based LattePanda Alpha SBC, and is shipping a model with 8GB RAM and 64GB eMMC without OS that supports Windows 10 or Ubuntu 16.04 LTS.

DFRobot’s LattePanda project has fulfilled its Kickstarter orders for its community-backed, Intel 7th Gen Core based LattePanda Alpha after several months of delays, and public sales have switched from pre-order to in-stock fulfillment for at least one model. Like the earlier, Intel Cherry Trail based LattePanda, the LattePanda Alpha is notable for being a community backed (but not fully open source) hacker board loaded with Windows 10. Yet with the LattePanda Alpha, you can also choose a more affordable barebones version without a Windows 10 key that supports an optimized, downloadable Ubuntu 16.04 LTS image.

Read more

Firefox ESR 60 Is Now Available on Ubuntu as a Snap, Here's How to Install It

Filed under
Moz/FF
Ubuntu

Every six weeks, a new major Firefox release hits the streets, and it's soon available in the Ubuntu repositories, but thanks to Canonical's Snappy technologies, users now have access to the latest ESR versions of Firefox too, which are mostly intended for the company's enterprise partners who want long-term supported Firefox release.

"The ESR version of Firefox is aimed at corporations who want to have more control over the version of Firefox their employees have installed," said Canonical in a blog post. "Mozilla recommends that users stay on the Rapid Release version if they wish the newest product features offered by Firefox."

Read more

Ubuntu 18.10 (Cosmic Cuttlefish) Is Now in Final Freeze, Launches October 18

Filed under
Ubuntu

With just one week left until the final release, Ubuntu 18.10, dubbed Cosmic Cuttlefish, has reached the final step in its development cycle, Final Freeze. This means that from this point until the final release only critical bugs that affect the ISO images or installers are admitted in the archives.

Of course, the Ubuntu engineers would need community's help to test the ISO images before they hit the stable channels, so they are working on releasing the Release Candidate (RC) images in the coming days on the official ISO tracker for Ubuntu and probably all other official flavors.

Read more

Plex Media Server Is Now Available as a Snap App for Ubuntu, Other Linux Distros

Filed under
Ubuntu

Already available as binary packages for Debian- and Red Hat-based operating systems using the DEB and RPM package format, the Plex Media Server over-the-top (OTT) media service used by millions worldwide is now easier to install across a multitude of GNU/Linux distributions as a Snap app from Canonical's Snap Store.

"The biggest appeal of Snaps is the simple installation mechanism," said Tamas Szelei, Software Engineer at Plex. "Canonical's Snap Store provides an easy and secure way to distribute our software to an increasing number of consumers. What's more, Snaps help cater to the more technical Plex user, who benefits from confined applications and the added sense of software security."

Read more

Ubuntu: Ubuntu 18.10, Ubuntu in 'Smart' Cities, and Snaps in Numbers

Filed under
Ubuntu
  • Do You Plan to Upgrade to Ubuntu 18.10?

    Such closeness means — shock — it’s almost-very-nearly upgrade decision time for many of us!

    The question is are you the sort of Linux user who likes to run the latest and greatest that open source software has to offer? Or do you prefer to play it safe on the stable foundation of an LTS? Perhaps you’re entirely uncertain?!

  • Ubuntu 18.10 Adds Gallium Nine Support, Latest Mesa 18.2.2

    A couple of graphic-related tidbits ahead of next week’s Ubuntu 18.10 release that some of you might be interested to know about.

    First up, Mesa.

    A feature freeze exception was granted to allow Mesa 18.2.x series in to the Ubuntu 18.10 archives, with Mesa 18.2.2 specifically (i.e the latest update) now ready in the archives.

  • Digital signage: the face of the smart city revolution

    Crucially, this means selecting an operating system and a digital signage solution with strong safety capabilities. Ubuntu is a strong choice for a secure OS, in large part because it restricts outside access to key system files better than most competitors. This makes it more difficult for malware to access a system. Meanwhile, in the signage software space, Broadsign is the clear winner thanks to SOC II and ISAE3402 audits that guarantee stronger SaaS security than what is standard for online banking.

  • Snapistics – Snaps in numbers

    Actions speak louder than words. So do numbers. When we talk about snaps, we often focus on the application packages, and talk about their individual merits. However, a no less important – and interesting – facet is the collective numbers behind the scenes. They tell a compelling story for developers and users alike. They allow us to look back and piece together a puzzle of perception and adoption, and map them onto underlying factors, like the introduction of the new Ubuntu LTS release, the availability of popular software, and deliberate changes introduced to make snaps more robust and accessible.

    Indeed, how do people perceive snaps? How well accepted are snaps in software development circles? Today, we’d like to share some of these figures.

You Can Now Run Ubuntu 18.04 on Raspberry Pi 3 with BunsenLabs' Helium Desktop

Filed under
Linux
Ubuntu

RaspEX Build 181010 is now available for Raspberry Pi users, made specifically for the latest Raspberry Pi model, the Raspberry Pi 3 Model B+, and featuring the super fast and lightweight Helium Desktop from the Debian-based BunsenLabs Linux distribution, a continuation of the acclaimed CrunchBang Linux.

The new RaspEX BunsenLabs build remains based on the latest Ubuntu 18.04 LTS (Bionic Beaver) operating system series, using packages from the Debian GNU/Linux 9 "Stretch" and Linaro open source software for ARM SoCs. RaspEX is compatible with Raspberry Pi 2, Raspberry Pi 3, and Raspberry Pi 3 Model B+.

Read more

NanoPi Neo4 SBC breaks RK3399 records for size and price

Filed under
Android
Linux
Ubuntu

FriendlyElec has launched a $45, Rockchip RK3399 based “NanoPi Neo4” SBC with a 60 x 45mm footprint, WiFi/BT, GbE, USB 3.0, HDMI 2.0, MIPI-CSI, a 40-pin header, and -20 to 70℃ support — but only 1GB of RAM.

In August, FriendlyElec introduced the NanoPi M4, which was then the smallest, most affordable Rockchip RK3399 based SBC yet. The company has now eclipsed the Raspberry Pi style, 85 x 56mm NanoPi M4 on both counts, with a 60 x 45mm size and $45 promotional price ($50 standard). The similarly open-spec, Linux and Android-ready NanoPi Neo4, however, is not likely to beat the M4 on performance, as it ships with only 1GB of DDR3-1866 instead of 2GB or 4GB of LPDDR3.

Read more

Canonical Releases Important Ubuntu Kernel Live Patch to Fix L1TF, SpectreRSB

Filed under
Ubuntu

Available for the Ubuntu 18.04 LTS (Bionic Beaver), Ubuntu 16.04 LTS (Xenial Xerus), and Ubuntu 14.04 LTS (Trusty Tahr) operating system series, the new Linux kernel livepatch is rolling out now to all subscribers of the Canonical Livepatch Service. It patches a total of seven security flaws, including the well-known L1 Terminal Fault (L1TF)/Foreshadow and SpectreRSB vulnerabilities.

The two L1FT vulnerabilities fixed in this new kernel livepatch are CVE-2018-3620 and CVE-2018-3646, but it also addresses a flaw that reduced the effectiveness of Spectre Variant 2 mitigations for paravirtual guests (CVE-2018-15594), a use-after-free vulnerability in the IRDA implementation (CVE-2018-6555), and a critical stack-based buffer overflow in the iSCSI target implementation (CVE-2018-14633).

Read more

Canonical/Ubuntu: Weekly Newsletter, Design and Web, Ubuntu Doing OpenStack

Filed under
Ubuntu
  • The Fridge: Ubuntu Weekly Newsletter Issue 548

    Welcome to the Ubuntu Weekly Newsletter, Issue 548 for the week of September 30 – October 6, 2018.

  • Design and Web team summary – 8 October 2018

    We’ve recently implemented the ability to include or exclude your Snap in certain territories. This functionality has been ported to improve the publisher experience on snapcraft.io. Part of the work is an implementation of a multi-select picker with filtering capabilities, that will be proposed to upstream Vanilla soon.

  • Ubuntu does OpenStack

    OpenStack, the open source cloud of choice for many businesses, has seen broad adoption across a large number of industries, from telco to finance, healthcare and more. It’s become something of a safe haven for highly regulated industries and for those looking to have a robust, secure cloud that is open source and enables them to innovate – without breaking the bank.

    For those of you that don’t know, Ubuntu does OpenStack.

    In fact, Ubuntu is the #1 platform for OpenStack and the #1 platform for public cloud operations on AWS, Azure, and Google Cloud, too – meaning that we know our stuff when it comes to building and operating clouds.

    Which is great news because Canonical, the company behind Ubuntu, helps to deliver OpenStack on rails, with consulting, training, enterprise support and managed operations that help your business to focus on what matters most – your applications, not the infrastructure.

ExTiX 18.10 Is the First Linux Distro Based on Ubuntu 18.10 (Cosmic Cuttlefish)

Filed under
Linux
Ubuntu

Dubbed "The Ultimate Linux System," ExTiX 18.10 Build 181006 is out now with Arne Exton's 4.18.12-exton kernel based on the latest stable Linux 4.18.12 kernel, which can be downloaded and installed on virtually any another Ubuntu- or Debian-based system, as well as the latest LXQt 0.13.0 desktop environment.

The operating system includes packages from the forthcoming Ubuntu 18.10 (Cosmic Cuttlefish) operating system, due for release on October 18, as well as from the Debian Stable repositories. It comes with the Calamares universal installer, which lets users install ExTiX on older, non-efi computers, as well as all the latest software updates.

Read more

Syndicate content

More in Tux Machines

OSS Leftover

  • How an affordable open source eye tracker is helping thousands communicate
    In 2015, while sat in a meeting at his full-time job, Julius Sweetland posted to Reddit about a project he had quietly been working on for years, that would help people with motor neurone disease communicate using just their eyes and an application. He forgot about the post for a couple of hours before friends messaged him to say he'd made the front page. Now three years on Optikey, the open source eye-tracking communication tool, is being used by thousands of people, largely through word of mouth recommendations. Sweetland was speaking at GitHub Universe at the Palace of Fine Art in San Francisco, and he took some time to speak with Techworld about the project. [...] Originally, Sweetland's exposure to open source had largely been through the consumption of tools such as the GIMP. "I knew of the concept, I didn't really know how the nuts and bolts worked, I was always a little blase about how do you make money from something like that... but flipping it around again I'm still coming from the point of view that there's no money in my product, so I still don't understand how people make money in open source...
  • Fission open source serverless framework gets updated
    Platform9 just released updates to Fission.io - the open source, Kubernetes-native Serverless framework, with new features enabling developers and IT Operations to improve the quality and reliability of serverless applications. Other new features include Automated Canary Deployments to reduce the risk of failed releases, Prometheus integration for automated monitoring and alerts, and fine-grained cost and performance optimization capabilities. With this latest release, Fission offers the most complete set of features to allow Dev and Ops teams to safely adopt Serverless and benefit from the speed, cost savings and scalability of this cloud native development pattern on any environment - either in the public cloud or on-premises.
  • Alphabet’s DeepMind open-sources key building blocks from its AI projects
  • United States: It's Ten O'Clock: Do You Know Where Your Software Developers Are? [Ed: Smith Gambrell & Russell LLP are liars. Dana Hustins says FSF "purport to convert others' proprietary software into open source software" in there. They paint GPL as a conspiracy of some kind to entrap proprietary s/w developers.]
  • Transatomic Power To Open Source IP Regarding Advanced Molten Salt Reactors [Ed: There's no such thing as "IP", Duane Morris LLP. There are copyrights, trademarks, patents etc. and Transatomic basically made code free.]
  • Code Review--an Excerpt from VM Brasseur's New Book Forge Your Future with Open Source
    Even new programmers can provide a lot of value with their code reviews. You don't have to be a Rockstar Ninja 10x Unicorn Diva programmer with years and years of experience to have valuable insights. In fact, you don't even have to be a programmer at all. You just have to be knowledgable enough to spot patterns. While you won't be able to do a complete review without programming knowledge, you may still spot things that could use some work or clarification. If you're not a Rockstar Ninja 10x Unicorn Diva programmer, not only is your code review feedback still valuable, but you can also learn a great deal in the process: Code layout, programming style, domain knowledge, best practices, neat little programming tricks you'd not have seen otherwise, and sometimes antipatterns (or "how not to do things"). So don't let the fact that you're unfamiliar with the code, the project, or the language hold you back from reviewing code contributions. Give it a go and see what there is to learn and discover.

Security Leftovers

Android Leftovers

Ubuntu 18.10 (Cosmic Cuttlefish) Is Now Available to Download

After six months in development, Ubuntu 18.10 (Cosmic Cuttlefish) is now finally here, and you can download the ISO images right now for all official flavors, including Kubuntu, Xubuntu, Lubuntu, Ubuntu MATE, Ubuntu Budgie, Ubuntu Kylin, and Ubuntu Studio, for 64-bit and 32-bit architectures (only Lubuntu and Xubuntu). The Ubuntu Server edition is also out and it's supported on more hardware architectures than Ubuntu Desktop, including 64-bit (amd64), ARM64 (AArch64), IBM System z (s390x), PPC64el (Power PC 64-bit Little Endian), and Raspberry Pi 2/ARMhf. A live Ubuntu Server flavor is also available only for 64-bit computers. Read more Also: Ubuntu Linux 18.10 arrives