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Ubuntu

Bill Wear, Developer Advocate for MAAS: foo.c

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OS
Development
Ubuntu

I remember my first foo. It was September, 1974, on a PDP-11/40, in the second-floor lab at the local community college. It was an amazing experience for a fourteen-year-old, admitted at 12 to audit night classes because his dad was a part-time instructor and full-time polymath.

I should warn you, I’m not the genius in the room. I maintained a B average in math and electrical engineering, but A+ averages in English, languages, programming, and organic chemistry (yeah, about that….). The genius was my Dad, the math wizard, the US Navy CIC Officer. More on him in a later blog — he’s relevant to what MAAS does in a big way.

Okay, so I’m more of a language (and logic) guy. But isn’t code where math meets language and logic?

Research Unix

Fifth edition UNIX had just been licensed to educational institutions at no cost, and since this college was situated squarely in the middle of the military-industrial complex, scoring a Hulking Giant was easy. Finding good code to run it? That was another issue, until Bell Labs offered up a freebie.

It was amazing! Getting the computer to do things on its own — via ASM and FORTRAN — was not new to me. What was new was the simplicity of the whole thing. Mathematically, UNIX and C were incredibly complex, incorporating all kinds of network theory and topology and numerical methods that (frankly) haven’t always been my favorite cup of tea. I’m not even sure if Computer Science was a thing yet.

But the amazing part? Here was an OS which took all that complexity and translated it to simple logic: everything is a file; small is beautiful; do one thing well. Didn’t matter that it was cranky and buggy and sometimes dumped your perfectly-okay program in the bit bucket. It was a thrill to be able to do something without having to obsess over the math underneath.

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Also: How to upgrade to Ubuntu 20.04 Daily Builds from Ubuntu 19.10

Canonical Donates More Ubuntu Phones to UBports and You Can Get One Right Now

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Ubuntu

Once again, Canonical decided to donate even more Ubuntu Touch devices to UBports, but this time there's even better news for those interested in contributing to the development of Ubuntu Touch, the mobile OS created by Canonical for Ubuntu Phones, which is now entirely maintained by the UBports Foundation.

This time, UBports decided to donate the Ubuntu Touch devices, which consists of two dozen BQ Aquaris E4 phones, two BQ Aquaris M10 tablets, one Meizu MX4 phone, and several other we can't identify, to any developer interested in joining the Ubuntu Phone movement and contribute to the development of Ubuntu Touch.

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Canonical Outs Major Linux Kernel Security Updates for All Supported Ubuntu OSes

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Security
Ubuntu

As announced the other day, Canonical was quick to respond to the latest security vulnerabilities affecting Intel CPU microarchitectures, so they now published Linux kernel updates to mitigate them. These are CVE-2019-11135, CVE-2018-12207, CVE-2019-0154, and CVE-2019-0155, which could allow local attackers to either expose sensitive information or possibly elevate privileges or cause a denial of service.

On top of these security issues affecting Intel CPUs, the new Linux kernel security updates also address three vulnerabilities (CVE-2019-15791, CVE-2019-15792, and CVE-2019-15793) discovered by Google Project Zero's Jann Horn in the shiftfs implementation, which could allow a local attacker to either execute arbitrary code, cause a denial of service (system crash), or bypass DAC permissions.

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Volla Phone Promises to Support Ubuntu Touch, Gets Kickstarter Campaign

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Ubuntu

Founded by Dr. Jörg Wurzer, an experienced entrepreneur with more than 20 years of experience in research and development in user experience, machine learning, natural language processing, artificial intelligence, and product management, Volla Phone promises to be a privacy-focused mobile phone powered by a free and open source operating system.

At its heart, the Volla Phone device will use Nemo Mobile, an OS based on the Android Open Source Project (AOSP) promising increased security and privacy features, as well as simplicity for the everyday user. For developers, Volla Phone also promises to support an alternative, free, and open-source operation system like Ubuntu Touch.

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Also: Ubuntu 18.04.4 LTS- Expected Release Date & More

Open-spec, dual-port router offers a choice of Allwinner H3 or H5

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Linux
Ubuntu

FriendlyElec’s Linux-driven, $20 “NanoPi R1S-H3” router uses a modified version of the Allwinner H3-based NanoPi R1, upgrading the second LAN port to GbE while removing a USB port. There’s also a similar, $23 “NanoPi R1S-H5” with a quad -A53 H5.

Back in February, FriendlyElec launched the community-backed NanoPi R1 router SBC, which still sells for $29. Now it has followed up with two more affordable NanoPi R1S routers based on upgraded versions of the NanoPi R1 that that give you dual GbE ports instead of 10/100Mbps and 10/1000/1000Mbps. The mainboards are smaller than the R1 at 55.6 x 52mm, and the board and the case have been entirely redesigned.

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Canonical at TechWeek Frankfurt and Open Infrastructure Summit Shanghai

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Ubuntu
  • Canonical at TechWeek Frankfurt

    The TechWeek Frankfurt trade show will explore solutions to technology challenges organisations face across cloud computing and security, DevOps practices, Big Data management and more.

  • Open Infrastructure Summit Shanghai 2019: the highlights

    OpenStack remains a big thing and its adoption is constantly growing. According to the 451 Research Market Monitor (Open Source Software, OpenStack) from September 2019, its combined market size worldwide is $7.7B. This is much more than the combined market size of application containers which is $4.38B.

    During that last development cycle for OpenStack Train, 1,125 developers from 165 organisations contributed their patches and 25,500 of them were accepted. This makes OpenStack one of the three most active open source projects in the world.

    Moreover, by coming to China the OpenStack Foundation clearly declares its openness for the Asia markets and cooperation with local organisations on driving the future of the OpenStack project.

Firewalla Gold Intel-based Ubuntu Router Enables Multi-Gigabit Cyber Security (Crowdfunding)

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Ubuntu

We covered Firewalla based on NanoPi NEO board in mid-2018. The device is a tiny firewall, parental control, ad-blocker, and VPN appliance for end-users.

Since then they’ve launched Firewalla Blue based on NanoPi NEO2 SBC with Gigabit Ethernet and a faster processor, and now the company has just introduced the even more powerful Intel-based Firewalla Gold.

The device runs Ubuntu Linux so the users will have full access to the operating system with SSH, and will be allowed to install their own packages. Just like the original Firewalla (now Firewalla Red) and Firewalla Blue, Firewalla Gold comes with a web interface to let users easily control what happens on their networks with features such as cyber threats protections, VPN, DDNS, SSH, Adblocker configuration. Additionally, the Firewalla app for Android or iOS enables users to set-up parental control, VPN, monitor bandwidth usage (Monthly / Daily / Hourly), and more…

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Ubuntu 18.04.4 LTS (Bionic Beaver) Slated for Release on February 6th, 2020

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Ubuntu

Released in April 2018, Ubuntu 18.04 LTS (Bionic Beaver) is the latest LTS (Long Term Support) version of the popular Ubuntu Linux operating system, supported by Canonical with software and security updates for 5 years, until 2023, but reaching end of life in April 2028.

As all Ubuntu LTS series, the Bionic Beaver will receive up to five point releases that bring a new installation medium with up-to-date components to make the deployment of the operating system less painful. The latest point release in the series being Ubuntu 18.04.3 LTS, released on August 8th, 2019.

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Ubuntu-Based Linux For All Distro Gets New Release Powered by Linux Kernel 5.4

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Linux
Ubuntu

LFA (Linux For All) Build 191111 is now available to download based on Canonical's latest Ubuntu 18.04.3 LTS (Bionic Beaver) operating system, but shipping with a much newer kernel, namely Linux 5.4 RC6. As such, LFA is one of the first distros to adopt the upcoming Linux 5.4 kernel series.

LFA (Linux For All) Build 191111 is not just an update to previous releases of the Ubuntu-based GNU/Linux distribution, but a total rebuild that now uses packages from the latest Ubuntu LTS (Long Term Support) release instead of those used in the latest Ubuntu Linux release.

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Ubuntu 20.04 LTS and Debian GNU/Linux 11 "Bullseye" Progress on Python 2 Removal

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Ubuntu

The removal of an older Python implementation from an entire operating system system and its software repositories is a major deal for any OS vendor as it raises many severity issues due to the fact that numerous packages have not been ported to a newer branch, in this case we're talking about the removal of Python 2 and its replacements with Python 3.

For Debian and Ubuntu, whose communities work closely together since the latter is based on the former, the transition from Python 2 to Python 3 started a few years ago, but now it's time for their next major release to ship without any Python 2 packages, though this appears to be a major deal even for some of the biggest GNU/Linux distributions in the world.

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