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Ubuntu

Upgrading Ubuntu

Filed under
Ubuntu

I tend to run Ubuntu on my computers as the primary operating system. Given I work for Canonical, this isn’t especially surprising. However I have run Ubuntu on pretty much everything since 2005 or so - long before I started working at Canonical (in 2011). Mostly I will upgrade as each new release comes out, only doing a clean install once in a while.

I ran GNOME 2 for all the years from 2004 through to Unity being released, then switched to that. After Ubuntu switched from Unity to GNOME Shell I went along with that in late 2017, and have mostly been running it ever since. I sometimes run other distros in VMs, or play with live environments, but I tend to stick to Ubuntu. Not for any company imposed reason - there’s a bunch of people at Canonical who run Arch, MacOS or something else. I just prefer Ubuntu.

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How to Install Linux Mint’s Cinnamon Desktop in Ubuntu

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Ubuntu

Linux Mint is known for its cinnamon desktop environment. It is a free and open-source desktop environment designed and developed based on GNOME 3.

If you are having Ubuntu on your desktop and get tried of using GNOME 3. Then you can easily switch to the cinnamon desktop in Ubuntu with few lines of command.

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Productivity corner: editors, editors, editors

Filed under
Software
Ubuntu

Text editors are a curious product. On one hand, they are simple, no-nonsense digital pads for taking notes, without any embellishments or visual styling. On the other, they are powerful code and data toolboxes, allowing for a great deal of flexibility and innovation. Indeed, software developers, Web developers and entrepreneuring nerds worldwide often use text editors for a range of useful tasks and activities. Never have so many owed so much to so few. To that end, we want to introduce you to several powerful text editors in the Snap Store.

[...]

Sometimes, an abundance of choice can be difficult for the consumer. With text editors, it’s quite the opposite. More is more. The wealth and diversity of available products in this space gives tinkerers and developers the ultimate freedom to select just the right tool for the job – and there could be many different tools for different jobs. Hopefully, this article will help you find the text editor that has the best features you need, and allow you to be even more productive in your endeavors. If you have any comments or suggestions, please join our forum for a discussion.

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Ubuntu is Making Home Folders Private in 21.04

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Ubuntu

If you create a new user on an Ubuntu system that user can ‘read’ files in the main ~/Home folder. Y’know, the one you probably use for your personal account.

It sounds crazy lax but, back in the early days of Ubuntu the reasoning was that multi-user systems have: “…some level of cooperation (if not trust) among the users – they’ll be members of the same family, or friends, or co-workers, or whatever – and it is useful for them to be able to share files reasonably conveniently”.

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DIGITAL HOARDING: UBUNTU MIRROR

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Ubuntu
HowTos

I have a bunch of Ubuntu machines on my local network at home. They all periodically need to check for updates then download & install them. Rather than have them all reach out to the official mirrors externally to my network, I decided to run my own mirror internally. This post is just a set of notes for anyone else who might be looking to do something similar.

I also do a lot of software building, and re-building, which pulls all kinds of random libraries, compilers and other packages from the archive. Having it local saves me repeatedly downloading from the ‘net while the kids are on Netflix School Zoom classes.

Don’t do this if you’re on a super slow connection because the mirror will probably never finish building. Also probably don’t do it if you have a per-byte billing arrangement with your provider. This will chew quite a bit of bandwidth, especially the first run. But even subsequent runs can do too, depending on how much chrurn in the Ubuntu Archive there’s been since it was last executed.

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User successfully runs Ubuntu on a jailbroken iPhone 7

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Ubuntu

The jailbreak process lets users run several tweaks and other iOS modifications, but one user recently decided to go further and install the Ubuntu operating system on an iPhone. The experiment was shared by the user identified as “newhacker1746” on Reddit.

According to the user, the iPhone 7 used during the process was no longer working due to a problem in its internal storage. That’s when the user decided to try installing another operating system on the device through a USB ethernet connection.

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Sebastian Schauenburg: Translators, please do not translate everything

Filed under
GNU
Linux
Ubuntu

You probably know the feeling of being the IT guy for your family (in this specific case, my mother-in-law). Her Linux laptop needed to be upgraded to the latest LTS, so I did that for her.

Back when she got the laptop, I installed a non-LTS release. That was required, otherwise her brand spanking new hardware, wouldn't have worked correctly.

I tried using the GUI to upgrade the system, but that didn't work. Usually I live in the terminal, so I quickly went to my comfort zone. I noticed the repositories were not available anymore, of course, this was not an LTS. That meant also that 'do-release-upgrade' did not work. Fortunately I was around when that tool did not exist yet, so I knew to manually modify apt sources files and run apt-get manually. The upgrade was a success of course. But, what is that, why am missing icons here? I also run Ubuntu MATE on some of my other systems and the icons never broke before. The upgrade seemed to have been flawless, but still something went wrong? No, that couldn't be... and it wasn't.

Switching her desktop to English, instead of Dutch (Nederlands), "fixed" the icons. That is strange, but is providing the user of the laptop with a workaround. Luckily my mother-in-law is proficient in English, but prefers Dutch. And there are enough people (I know some of them) who can not read/write/speak English and are dependant on translations. So I thought I'd go fix the issue (or at least, so I thought).

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First Ubuntu Commands for First Timer

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Ubuntu

Here's simple command line guide for you computer user who find Ubuntu GNU/Linux for the first time. These commands are all built-in, you do not need to add anything to use them. They are useful to you, for instance, to read your complete computer information and of course to know about basic commands. Why learn commands? Because commands are fast as you will learn below. You will also see further references to learn more at the end of this article. Have fun learning!

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What To Do After Installing Kubuntu 20.10 Groovy Gorilla

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GNU
KDE
Linux
Ubuntu

This is the traditional beginner's guide for you who have his/her Kubuntu computer updated, this time, to the version 20.10 codenamed Groovy Gorilla. In this version several new things added such as the Network Speed widget and the ability to have Metered Connections you can adjust with this short tutorial. Okay, now let's explore!

First thing to do for many people is to connect to the internet. Connected at the first time, special to Kubuntu, you will be asked for (1) inserting the wifi's password and (2) making a new KDE Wallet's password. For the wifi's password, once you typed it and press Connect, the KDE Wallet will appear. Do not worry, you just need to create a password and repeat it once, and then select Blowfish encryption option. I suggest you to use same password as your system password. After this, you can connect to that wifi safely without entering password again.

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7 Best Ubuntu live USB creators to Download & Use

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GNU
Linux
Ubuntu

Live Environment is not just limited to Ubuntu only, most of the Linux operating system comes with Live support. This means we can use them and perform all computing tasks, however without actually installing that particular Linux operating system. For example Ubuntu Live, Kali Linux, Pop OS, Linux Mint, Fedora, etc. all of them come with two options one is to use them as a LIVE OS, and if you like then use the installation one as well…

H0wever, few distributions offer there Live Linux as a separate ISO file besides the standard such as Kali, where Ubuntu’s standard version whether it is Ubuntu 20.04/20.10/18.10 or others all of them come with a “Try Ubuntu” option which is basically to try Ubuntu as Live CD or USB.

What is a Live USB?

A Live USB is a USB drive containing OS files to give full access to the operating system that further can be booted with or without any internal hard drive in the computer system. It allows us to perform all the functions that an installed OS lets us such as installing programs, accessing all system hardware, writing storage devices, and more. Most of the Linux OS can be run and used from a USB flash drive including modern Windows 10. Know more about it on Wikipedia.

In this article, we will let you know the few tools that can help us to create a bootable Live Ubuntu USB drive.

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