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Ubuntu

Ubuntu Vs Pop!_OS: Which One’s Better?

Filed under
GNU
Linux
Ubuntu

Both Ubuntu and Pop!OS is great for beginners as well as professionals. Like how the budget Android devices ship with a lot of bloatware, Ubuntu also ships with bloatware, resulting in a relatively poor user experience and performance compared to Pop!_OS.

Ubuntu also comes with “Ubuntu Minimal options” that don’t include many applications letting you install what you actually need. Apart from that, Ubuntu’s software center has a built-in section for snap applications, whereas you won’t find snap packages in the Pop!_OS shop rather you’ll find the Flatpak package option.

However, Snap packages take too much space on the disk; hence, we suggest you consider using the APT version of any application. Pop!_OS also has its own official PPA, where you can find applications like TensorFlow and Android Studio one “apt-get install” away from installing.

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Top 10 Features of Ubuntu 20.10 Groovy Gorilla

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Ubuntu

It's finally the time for the release of Ubuntu 20.10 Groovy Gorilla this week. And here I put together a list of the top 10 features of Ubuntu 20.10 which you could read before you try your hands on the actual iso.
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Graylog Monitoring Server on Ubuntu Linux for Monitoring Server/Services

Filed under
Server
Software
Ubuntu

Graylog is not a system monitoring tool; it’s a system monitoring server. I am sure; previously, you have been using tools to monitor your Linux system. The concept of Graylog is mind-blowing; it’s enormous. Have you thought before that you can install an entire server to monitor your system or services? Graylog offers you to monitor your small, medium, and big all types of systems and services. As you are going through this post, you will learn a lot about the Graylog monitoring server. Graylog will provide you every single detail that you might have wanted to know about your system. Installing and configuring the Graylog monitoring server is not much complex on Ubuntu and other Linux distributions.

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Will You Upgrade/Install Ubuntu 20.10? [Poll]

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Ubuntu

If you read this site regularly you will know all there is to know about the upcoming Ubuntu 20.10 release. Goodies on offer include GNOME 3.38, Linux 5.8 kernel, a bespoke new-look for LibreOffice, and (of course) a gaudy new desktop graphic.

But does Groovy vibe with you? Is this gorilla more done-wrong than king-kong? Do you ape-riciate its changes, or is there little to go bananas for?

Whatever the answer to my terrible wordplay is do go ahead and file your intentions in the poll below.

Although the poll (and this post) is phrased around an “upgrade” this doesn’t have to mean a direct upgrade from Ubuntu 20.04; fresh installs count as an upgrade too.

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NanoPi R2S & NanoPi NEO3 tested with Armbian – Thermal test, Ethernet and USB performance

Filed under
GNU
Linux
Hardware
Debian
Ubuntu

In the first part of the review of NanoPi NEO3 and Nano R2S I checked out the hardware, with both tiny gateways powered by a Rockchip RK3328 processor but a different features as NEO3 includes a Gigabit Ethernet port and a USB 3.0 port, while R2S comes with dual Gigabit Ethernet ports and a USB 2.0 port.

I’ve now had time to test both gateways using Armbian 20.08.1 release based on Ubuntu 20.04 Focal. Note that while NanoPi R2S is officially supported by Armbian, NanoPi NEO3 images are currently tagged as “suitable for testing“. Having that said I did not come across any specific issues on NEO3, and it may mostly mean it’s easier to get support on the forums with R2S.

[...]

That means Ubuntu 20.04 with Linux 5.8.6, but since Armbian is always updated, I ended the review with Linux 5.8.15. I’ll focus the review on thermal testing, as well as Ethernet and USB performance.

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Debian and Ubuntu Leftovers

Filed under
Debian
Ubuntu
  • Debian Janitor: How to Contribute Lintian-Brush Fixers

    The Debian Janitor is an automated system that commits fixes for (minor) issues in Debian packages that can be fixed by software. It gradually started proposing merges in early December. The first set of changes sent out ran lintian-brush on sid packages maintained in Git. This post is part of a series about the progress of the Janitor.

  • Raphaël Hertzog: Freexian’s report about Debian Long Term Support, September 2020

    Like each month, here comes a report about the work of paid contributors to Debian LTS.

  • Ubuntu Blog: Introducing Ubuntu support for Amazon EKS 1.18

    Amazon Elastic Kubernetes Service (EKS) is a fully automated Kubernetes cluster service on Amazon Web Services (AWS). Ubuntu is a popular and proven operating system for both virtual machine and containerized cloud computing. Canonical (the creator and primary maintainer of Ubuntu) is an Amazon partner and works with the EKS team to provide an optimized Ubuntu Amazon Machine Image (AMI) for running Kubernetes on AWS. EKS-optimized Ubuntu AMIs give you the familiarity and consistency of using Ubuntu, optimized for performance and security on EKS clusters.

    Ubuntu optimized AMIs for Amazon EKS and Kubernetes versions 1.17 and 1.18 are now available. These images combine the Ubuntu OS with Canonical’s distribution of upstream Kubernetes that automates K8s deployment and operations. In addition to using a slimmed-down, minimal image these images take advantage of a custom kernel that is jointly developed with AWS.

  • Ubuntu 18.04 Users Can Upgrade to Ubuntu 20.04 LTS (Yes, Finally)

    If you’re on Ubuntu 18.04 LTS and you’ve been waiting for the prompt that lets you upgrade to Ubuntu 20.04 LTS you can relax: it’s rolling out

    Confused? I imagine a lot of people reading this post will be. So I’ll recap: an Ubuntu LTS to LTS upgrade is only “officially” possible once the first point release to the latest LTS has gone live.

    But until it does you can’t upgrade one LTS to the new LTS., not without diving into the command line.

    Ubuntu 20.04.1 LTS was released in July. In theory, Ubuntu 18.04 LTS users should’ve started to see the “there’s a newer version of Ubuntu” upgrade prompt box on their desktops from this date onwards.

Dell Ubuntu, Lenovo Fedora, And Slimbook Elementary OS

Filed under
OS
Red Hat
Ubuntu

This year good news coming one after another. Everything starts with Fedora announcing Fedora on Lenovo ThinkPad laptops, then Ubuntu announcing Dell XPS Focal Fossa, and now elementary OS announcing both Slimbook and Pine64 PineBook laptops. Now everybody globally can find Ubuntu, Fedora, and elementary OS preloaded on branded laptops and PCs. This means GNU/Linux desktop goes mainstream. I am happy to see this. I really want to sum them up in one article so everybody sees these great moment. For everyone who loves Free Software community here's the news for you!

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Canonical Introducing HA MicroK8s

Filed under
Server
Ubuntu

     

  • Introducing HA MicroK8s, the ultra-reliable, minimal Kubernetes | Ubuntu

    Canonical today announced autonomous high availability (HA) clustering in MicroK8s, the lightweight Kubernetes. Already popular for IoT and developer workstations, MicroK8s now gains resilience for production workloads in cloud and server deployments.

    High availability is enabled automatically once three or more nodes are clustered, and the data store migrates automatically between nodes to maintain quorum in the event of a failure. “The autonomous HA MicroK8s delivers a zero-ops experience that is perfect for distributed micro clouds and busy administrators”, says Alex Chalkias, Product Manager at Canonical.

    Designed as a minimal conformant Kubernetes, MicroK8s installs and clusters with a single command.

  • Canonical introduces high-availability Micro-Kubernetes | ZDNet

    If you've been hiding under a rock -- and who could blame you these days? -- you may have missed how totally Kubernetes now dominates container orchestration. One way to quickly get up to speed on Kubernetes is with Canonical's  MicroK8s. This is an easy-to-run and install mini-version of Kubernetes. And now Canonical has added autonomous high availability (HA) clustering to it. 

    Seriously.

  • Canonical Announces HA MicroK8s

    MicroK8s, already popular for IoT and developer workstations, now gains resilience for production workloads in cloud and server deployments. Canonical has announced autonomous high availability (HA) clustering in MicroK8s, the lightweight Kubernetes.

Ubuntu Vs. Fedora: Which One Should You Choose?

Filed under
Red Hat
Ubuntu

Both Ubuntu and Fedora are among the most popular Linux distros on the market. As such, there is an on-going debate in the Linux community concerning the better distro among the two – Ubuntu vs. Fedora.

With that being said, both distros are targeted at different users with different needs. So depending on what you plan to do on your computer, installing one distro will prove beneficial over the other.

This is why we will be moving away from the mainstream debate and focus on discussing the major differences between Ubuntu and Fedora. By the end of this read, you should have a solid understanding of what both distros have to offer, and thereby, which one is right for you.

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First Look: See What’s New in Ubuntu 20.10 ‘Groovy Gorilla’ [Video]

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Ubuntu

So to provide you (and me) with proof that six months has indeed passed here’s our Ubuntu 20.10 release video, which we’re posting ahead of the Groovy Gorilla’s stable debut in 2 weeks so you have time to soak in the changes.

I’ll be honest: Ubuntu 20.10 is not the most exciting release in Ubuntu’s history. In fact, trying to make a video about this version was a bit of a challenge! While there are changes, new features, and improvements, they’re incremental in nature. That’s hard to demo.

Hit play on video embed above to join me on my bi-annual run-through of all that’s new, nascent, and notable in the latest (and perhaps greatest?) iteration.

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More in Tux Machines

Android Leftovers

Devices/Embedded: MiTAC, Raspberry Pi and ESP32/Arduino

  • Fanless Linux embedded system makes a compact IoT gateway

    ICP Germany has recently introduced the MiTAC ME1-8MD series family of compact, fanless Linux embedded systems powered by NXP i.MX 8M processor and designed to be used as IoT gateways, data acquisition and processing systems, and mini servers. Three models have been launched with a choice of dual or quad-core processors, up to 4GB LPDDR4 RAM, and 32GB eMMC flash storage. The embedded computers also come with up to two Ethernet ports, support up to two displays, and include an internal Raspberry Pi compatible 40 pin GPIO header.

  • Official Raspberry Pi 4 case fan adds cooling to Raspberry Pi 4 case

    When the Raspberry Pi Foundation first introduced the Raspberry Pi 4, they claimed the board would work just fine under most cases without a heatsink, and the latter was only really needed under load. That may have been true when using the board in a temperate climate like in the United Kingdom, but then Raspberry Pi 4 met Thailand with some benchmarks results lower than on a Raspberry Pi 3. People using plastic enclosures had even more troubles. It’s only when I installed a heatsink on Raspberry Pi 4 that the board could really shine. The company also provided some firmware optimizations later on to further cool-down the board. But you can only do much with software, and many third-party cooling solutions such as fansinks or metal cases have been introduced for the popular SBC.

  • Pi-oT 2 IoT module adds 24V digital inputs, RS-485, and UPS to Raspberry Pi (Crowdfunding)

    Pi-oT was launched last year as a Raspberry Pi add-ons designed for commercial and industrial IoT automation. It features 5V I/Os, relays, and ADC inputs suitable for light-duty projects and prototyping. The company, called Edge Devices, has now launched an update with Pi-oT 2 adding optional support for 24V digital inputs, RS-485, and an uninterruptible power supply (UPS).

  • M5Paper ESP32 IoT development kit features a 4.7-inch e-Ink touchscreen display

    M5Stack has just launched its unique and latest core device with a touchscreen e-Ink display. M5Paper ESP32 IoT Development Kit is a fully programmable microcontroller-based platform that can be an ideal choice for your IoT applications. This low-power device could suit such purposes as an industrial controller or smart weather display.

today's howtos

  • Enable Timestamp For History Command In Fish Shell - OSTechNix

    Whenever a command is entered in the terminal, it will be saved at the end of the history file in Linux. You can easily retrieve these commands at any time using history command. The shell is also tracking the timestamp of all command entries, so that we can easily find when a specific command is executed. We already have shown you how to enable timestamp in Bash and Zsh shells. Today we will see how to enable timestamp for history command in Fish shell in Linux. In addition, we will also learn how to create a simple function to show the date and time stamps in history command output in fish shell.

  • Linux: How To Encrypt And Decrypt Files With A Password
  • How to convert pdf to image on Linux command line - nixCraft

    I have many PDF files, and I need to convert them to a png file format, add a border to those images, and convert back all those images to pdf format. How can I convert pdf to image format on Linux and vice versa using the CLI?

  • How To Install PHP 8 on Ubuntu 20.04 LTS - idroot

    In this tutorial, we will show you how to install PHP 8 on Ubuntu 20.04 LTS. For those of you who didn’t know, PHP (recursive acronym for PHP: Hypertext Preprocessor) is a popular server scripting language known for creating dynamic and interactive Web pages. PHP is a widely-used programming language on the Web. This article assumes you have at least basic knowledge of Linux, know how to use the shell, and most importantly, you host your site on your own VPS. The installation is quite simple and assumes you are running in the root account, if not you may need to add ‘sudo‘ to the commands to get root privileges. I will show you through the step by step installation of PHP 8 on Ubuntu 20.04 (Focal Fossa). You can follow the same instructions for Ubuntu 18.04, 16.04, and any other Debian based distribution like Linux Mint.

  • How to Restrict WordPress Site Access - Anto Online

    A lot of the time, you need to restrict access to various users on your website. Whether you’re cordoning premium content, sensitive pages, or content targeted to specific individuals, there are various ways you can restrict user access easily and effectively on your WordPress website. The easiest method is using plugins that you can just download and link with your website. If you have coding skills, you can also edit various functions to achieve the same thing. We shall also take a look at how you can restrict site managers with various levels of access. Whatever kind of site restrictions you need to accomplish, stick with us and we will help you do it.

Linux Kernel: Greg Kroah-Hartman's Talk and Panics

  • Greg Kroah-Hartman: Lessons for Developers from 20 Years of Linux Kernel Work [Ed: "The Linux Foundation is a sponsor of The New Stack" for the latter to write puff pieces such as these, so it's basically marketing]
  • Greg Kroah-Hartman: 'Don't Make Users Mad'

    Kroah-Hartman explains that one of Linus Torvalds' most deeply-held convictions: don't break userspace. "Other operating systems have this rule as well — it's a very solid rule — because we always want you to upgrade. And we want you to upgrade without worrying about it. We don't want you to feel scared. If you see a new release, and we say, 'Hey, this fixes a bunch of problems,' we don't want you to feel worried about taking that. That's really really important — especially with security...." If you do make a change, make sure there truly is a compelling reason. "You have to provide enough reason and enough goodness to force somebody to take the time to learn to do something else. That's very rare." His example of this was systemd, which unified a variety of service configurations and initialization processes. "They did it right. They provided all the functionality, they solved a real problem that was there. They unified all these existing tools and problems in such a way that it was just so much better to use, and it provided enough impetus that everybody was willing to do the work to modify their own stuff and move to the new model. It worked. People still complain about it, but it worked. Everybody switched... It works well. It solves a real problem. "That was an example of how you can provide a compelling reason to move on — and make the change."

  • What to do in case of a Linux kernel panic

    Linux is used everywhere in the IT world. You've probably used Linux today, even if you didn't realize it. If you have learned anything about Linux, then you know it is indeed a kernel. The kernel is the primary unit of the Linux operating system (OS) and is responsible for communications between a computer's hardware and its processes. In this article, you will learn about one situation related to the Linux kernel: The kernel panic. The term itself can make you panic, but if you have the proper knowledge, then you can remain calm. Every system admin faces this issue at least once in their career, but reinstalling the system is not the first solution you should turn to. [...] Now, anytime you see a kernel panic error, you will definitely not panic because you know why this error occurred and how to resolve it. This article covers one of the common Linux boot problems: kernel panic. There are so many other potential boot problems that can occur in Linux, but resolving those issues will become much less of a panic when you gain some advanced knowledge of your system.