Language Selection

English French German Italian Portuguese Spanish

Ubuntu

Ubuntu 19.10 “Eoan Ermine” Released. Here's What's New

Filed under
Ubuntu

Ubuntu 19.10 “Eoan Ermine” is released with latest features, iconic changes. Read on.

Ubuntu – the most popular and widely used Linux Operating system for desktop and servers, announced the release of fresh Ubuntu 19.10 “Eoan Ermine”. This is a non-LTS release which means it is feature rich and supported till July 2020. Targeted for early adopters – Ubuntu 19.10 “Eoan Ermine” brings some important changes. These changes are the foundation for the next LTS release.

Read more

10 Things To Do After Installing Ubuntu 19.10

Filed under
Ubuntu

For the record, we’ve written a list of ‘things to do after installing Ubuntu’ for the past 20 Ubuntu releases. That’s two lists a year, every year, for a decade — and each list is specifically tailored to each version of Ubuntu.

Our rundown for Ubuntu 19.10? Well, it’s no exception!

As always: we never suggest you do anything that would damage or harm your install. So for tips on how to butcher Eoan with beta software, unstable drivers, and deep-level config meddling, you’ll need to look elsewhere!

Otherwise read on for plenty of useful pointers and pertinent advice on how to get the most from your spangly new Linux system.

Let’s go!

Read more

Kubuntu 19.10 Arrives with KDE Plasma 5.16, Embedded Nvidia Drivers, and More

Filed under
KDE
Ubuntu

Featuring the KDE Plasma 5.16.5 desktop environment and KDE Applications 19.04.3 software suite, the Kubuntu 19.10 release is here with up-to-date core components and applications, including Qt 5.12.4 LTS, Latte Dock 0.9.3, Elisa 0.4.2, Krita 4.2.7, Kdevelop 5.4.2, Ktorrent 5.1.2, as well as Kdenlive and Yakuake 19.08.1.

"Plasma 5, the new generation of KDE's desktop has been developed to make it smoother to use while retaining the familiar setup," reads the release notes. "Plasma 5.16 has been developed to make it smoother to use while retaining the familiar setup. Kubuntu ships the 4th scheduled bugfix release of 5.16 (5.16.5)."

Read more

Also: Ubuntu MATE 19.10 Released with Latest MATE Desktop, New Apps, Many Improvements

Embedded system cross-development with Ubuntu Core

Filed under
Ubuntu

There are fundamental differences between developing general-purpose software applications and making software for embedded systems. Embedded systems software runs on resource-constrained hardware, in contrast to general-purpose server or client applications that run on more capable hardware. For this reason, embedded system software is not directly developed on the electronic board it will run on – referred to as the target. It is rather developed on a computer – the host – that has a higher computational capacity than the target board.

Read more

Canonical releases Ubuntu Linux 19.10 Eoan Ermine with GNOME 3.34, light theme, and Raspberry Pi 4 support

Filed under
Ubuntu

Thank God for Linux. No, seriously, regardless of your beliefs, you should be thankful that we have the Linux kernel to provide us with a free alternative to Windows 10. Lately, Microsoft's operating system has been plagued by buggy updates, causing some Windows users to lose faith in it. Hell, even Dona Sarkar -- the now-former leader of the Windows Insider program -- has been relieved of her duties and transitioned to a new role within the company (read into that what you will).

While these are indeed dark times for Windows, Linux remains that shining beacon of light. When Windows becomes unbearable, you can simply use Chrome OS, Android, Fedora, Manjaro, or some other Linux distribution. Today, following the beta period, one of the best and most popular Linux-based desktop operating systems reaches a major milestone -- you can now download Ubuntu 19.10! Code-named "Eoan Ermine" (yes, I know, it's a terrible name), the distro is better and faster then ever.

Read more

Canonical Outs Linux Kernel Security Update for Ubuntu 19.04 to Patch 9 Flaws

Filed under
Linux
Security
Ubuntu

The new security update for Ubuntu 19.04 is here to patch a total of seven security flaws affecting the Linux 5.0 kernel used by the operating system, including an issue (CVE-2019-15902) discovered by Brad Spengler which could allow a local attacker to expose sensitive information as a Spectre mitigation was improperly implemented in the ptrace susbsystem.

It also fixes several flaws (CVE-2019-14814, CVE-2019-14815, CVE-2019-14816) discovered by Wen Huang in the Marvell Wi-Fi device driver, which could allow local attacker to cause a denial of service or execute arbitrary code, as well as a flaw (CVE-2019-15504) discovered by Hui Peng and Mathias Payer in the 91x Wi-Fi driver, allowing a physically proximate attacker to crash the system.

Read more

Ubuntu 19.10: What’s New? [Video]

Filed under
Ubuntu

Yes, I dusted off my old Canon T2i and pointed it at my trusty (if currently rather dusty) Ubuntu laptop to showcase the core changes and improvements that are on offer in the ‘Eoan Ermine’ (just don’t ask me how to pronounce the name).

In 3 minutes and 31 seconds (exactly) you’ll learn all that’s new, nascent and notable in this, the latest Ubuntu release. From the experimental ZFS install option to easy app folder creation, and the new ‘lighter’ Ubuntu GNOME Shell theme.

Read more

Happy 15th Birthday, Ubuntu!

Filed under
Ubuntu

Ubuntu has come a long way since its ‘Warty Warthog’ days. The distro is by far the most popular Linux flavor in the market right now. According to W3Techs.com, Ubuntu leads the pack with 37.4% of the market, while Debian is a close second at 21.2%.

This is a far cry from the 8.9% popularity that Ubuntu garnered when W3Techs.com first began tracking such data in January 2010. Ubuntu was the 5th most popular Linux distro back then, behind Debian, CentOS, Red Hat, and Fedora, respectively.

Not only is Ubuntu the favorite of many users, but it is also now in the workplace as well, World-wide. Many companies and individuals choose Ubuntu as their distro of choice. The top users of Ubuntu reside in the United States. However, there are also a significant number of Ubuntu users in the United Kingdom, Germany, Canada, India, and the Netherlands.

Since its birth almost 14 years ago, Ubuntu has spawned many successful forks such as Linux Mint, elementary OS, Zorin OS, Pop!_OS, and KDE neon. This list does not even include some of Ubuntu’s derivatives, including Lubuntu, Kubuntu, Xubuntu, Ubuntu MATE, and Ubuntu Budgie.

Read more

Something exciting is coming with Ubuntu 19.10

Filed under
Ubuntu

ZFS is a combined file system and logical volume manager that is scalable, supplying support for high storage capacity and a more efficient data compression, and includes snapshots and rollbacks, copy-on-write clones, continuous integrity checking, automatic repair, and much more.

So yeah, ZFS is a big deal, which includes some really great features. But out of those supported features, it's the snapshots and rollbacks that should have every Ubuntu user/admin overcome with a case of the feels.

Why? Imagine something has gone wrong. You've lost data or an installation of a piece of software has messed up the system. What do you do? If you have ZFS and you've created a snapshot, you can roll that system back to the snapshot where everything was working fine.

Although the concept isn't new to the world of computing, it's certainly not something Ubuntu has had by default. So this is big news.

Read more

Canonical Is At Around 437 Employees, Pulled In $99M While Still Operating At A Loss

Filed under
Ubuntu

Canonical's financial numbers for the period through the end of 2018 are now available, which is a shortened nine month period after changing around their fiscal year to coincide with the end of the calendar year rather than 31 March.

Read more

Syndicate content

More in Tux Machines

Android Leftovers

Kernel Articles at LWN (Paywall Just Expired)

  • Filesystem sandboxing with eBPF

    Bijlani is focused on a specific type of sandbox: a filesystem sandbox. The idea is to restrict access to sensitive data when running these untrusted programs. The rules would need to be dynamic as the restrictions might need to change based on the program being run. Some examples he gave were to restrict access to the ~/.ssh/id_rsa* files or to only allow access to files of a specific type (e.g. only *.pdf for a PDF reader). He went through some of the existing solutions to show why they did not solve his problem, comparing them on five attributes: allowing dynamic policies, usable by unprivileged users, providing fine-grained control, meeting the security needs for running untrusted code, and avoiding excessive performance overhead. Unix discretionary access control (DAC)—file permissions, essentially—is available to unprivileged users, but fails most of the other measures. Most importantly, it does not suffice to keep untrusted code from accessing files owned by the user running the code. SELinux mandatory access control (MAC) does check most of the boxes (as can be seen in the talk slides [PDF]), but is not available to unprivileged users. Namespaces (or chroot()) can be used to isolate filesystems and parts of filesystems, but cannot enforce security policies, he said. Using LD_PRELOAD to intercept calls to filesystem operations (e.g. open() or write()) is a way for unprivileged users to enforce dynamic policies, but it can be bypassed fairly easily. System calls can be invoked directly, rather than going through the library calls, or files can be mapped with mmap(), which will allow I/O to the files without making system calls. Similarly, ptrace() can be used, but it suffers from time-of-check-to-time-of-use (TOCTTOU) races, which would allow the security protections to be bypassed.

  • Generalizing address-space isolation

    Linux systems have traditionally run with a single address space that is shared by user and kernel space. That changed with the advent of the Meltdown vulnerability, which forced the merging of kernel page-table isolation (KPTI) at the end of 2017. But, Mike Rapoport said during his 2019 Open Source Summit Europe talk, that may not be the end of the story for address-space isolation. There is a good case to be made for increasing the separation of address spaces, but implementing that may require some fundamental changes in how kernel memory management works. Currently, Linux systems still use a single address space, at least when they are running in kernel mode. It is efficient and convenient to have everything visible, but there are security benefits to be had from splitting the address space apart. Memory that is not actually mapped is a lot harder for an attacker to get at. The first step in that direction was KPTI. It has performance costs, especially around transitions between user and kernel space, but there was no other option that would address the Meltdown problem. For many, that's all the address-space isolation they would like to see, but that hasn't stopped Rapoport from working to expand its use.

  • Identifying buggy patches with machine learning

    The stable kernel releases are meant to contain as many important fixes as possible; to that end, the stable maintainers have been making use of a machine-learning system to identify patches that should be considered for a stable update. This exercise has had some success but, at the 2019 Open Source Summit Europe, Sasha Levin asked whether this process could be improved further. Might it be possible for a machine-learning system to identify patches that create bugs and intercept them, so that the fixes never become necessary? Any kernel patch that fixes a bug, Levin began, should include a tag marking it for the stable updates. Relying on that tag turns out to miss a lot of important fixes, though. About 3-4% of the mainline patch stream was being marked, but the number of patches that should be put into the stable releases is closer to 20% of the total. Rather than try to get developers to mark more patches, he developed his machine-learning system to identify fixes in the mainline patch stream automatically and queue them for manual review. This system uses a number of heuristics, he said. If the changelog contains language like "fixes" or "causes a panic", it's likely to be an important fix. Shorter patches tend to be candidates.

  • Next steps for kernel workflow improvement

    The kernel project's email-based development process is well established and has some strong defenders, but it is also showing its age. At the 2019 Kernel Maintainers Summit, it became clear that the kernel's processes are much in need of updating, and that the maintainers are beginning to understand that. It is one thing, though, to establish goals for an improved process; it is another to actually implement that process and convince developers to use it. At the 2019 Open Source Summit Europe, a group of 20 or so maintainers and developers met in the corner of a noisy exhibition hall to try to work out what some of the first steps in that direction might be. The meeting was organized and led by Konstantin Ryabitsev, who is in charge of kernel.org (among other responsibilities) at the Linux Foundation (LF). Developing the kernel by emailing patches is suboptimal, he said, especially when it comes to dovetailing with continuous-integration (CI) processes, but it still works well for many kernel developers. Any new processes will have to coexist with the old, or they will not be adopted. There are, it seems, some resources at the LF that can be directed toward improving the kernel's development processes, especially if it is clear that this work is something that the community wants.

Server Leftovers

  • Knative at 1: New Changes, New Opportunities

    This summer marked the one-year anniversary of Knative, an open-source project that provides the fundamental building blocks for serverless workloads in Kubernetes. In its relatively short life (so far), Knative is already delivering on its promise to boost organizations’ ability to leverage serverless and FaaS (functions as a service). Knative isn’t the only serverless offering for Kubernetes, but it has become a de-facto standard because it arguably has a richer set of features and can be integrated more smoothly than the competition. And the Knative project continues to evolve to address businesses’ changing needs. In the last year alone, the platform has seen many improvements, giving organizations looking to expand their use of Kubernetes through serverless new choices, new considerations and new opportunities.

  • Redis Labs Leverages Kubernetes to Automate Database Recovery

    Redis Labs today announced it has enhanced the Operator software for deploying its database on Kubernetes clusters to include an automatic cluster recovery that enables customers to manage a stateful service as if it were stateless. Announced at Redis Day, the latest version of Kubernetes Operator for Redis Enterprise makes it possible to spin up a new instance of a Redis database in minutes. Howard Ting, chief marketing officer for Redis Labs, says as Kubernetes has continued to gain traction, it became apparent that IT organizations need tools to provision Redis Enterprise for Kubernetes clusters. That requirement led Redis Labs to embrace Operator software for Kubernetes developed by CoreOS, which has since been acquired by Red Hat. IT teams can either opt to recover databases manually using Kubernetes Operator or configure the tool to recover databases automatically anytime a database goes offline. In either case, he says, all datasets are loaded and balanced across the cluster without any need for manual workflows.

  • Dare to Transform IT with SUSE Global Services

Audiocasts/Shows: FLOSS Weekly and Linux Headlines

  • FLOSS Weekly 555: Emissions API

    Emissions API is easy to access satellite-based emission data for everyone. The project strives to create an application interface that lowers the barrier to use the data for visualization and/or analysis.

  • 2019-11-13 | Linux Headlines

    It’s time to update your kernel again as yet more Intel security issues come to light, good news for container management and self-hosted collaboration, and Brave is finally ready for production.