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Ubuntu 20.10 Groovy Gorilla is Now Available for Download, this is What's New

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Ubuntu

The latest Ubuntu 20.10 code-named "Groovy Gorilla" is available for download after a bit of delay due to last-minute bugs. The final announcement is due shortly today October 22 2020 from Canonical. Check out what's new.
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Ubuntu 20.10 (Groovy Gorilla) Is Now Available for Download, This Is What’s New

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Ubuntu

Dubbed Groovy Gorilla, Ubuntu 20.10 has been in development for the past six months, continuing the six-month release cycle of Ubuntu. It supersedes the previous release, Ubuntu 20.04 LTS (Focal Fossa), though being a long-term support series many will prefer not to upgrade since they’ll receive free updates for at least 4 and a half more years.

What’s new in Ubuntu 20.10? Well, being a short-lived release supported for only nine months, Ubuntu 20.10 comes with a handful of new features, including the latest and greatest GNOME 3.38 desktop environment which I previewed last month if you’re curious to see the differences from GNOME 3.36 used in Ubuntu 20.04 LTS.

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Ubuntu 20.10 Released

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Ubuntu
  • Ubuntu 20.10 released, brings full Linux dekstop to Raspberry Pi

    Open-source software fans will now be able to work across even more devices after Canonical revealed the launch of Ubuntu 20.10.

    The latest version of the world's most popular open-source software features a raft of upgrades and improvements, making it more accessible and easier to use than ever before.

    For the first time, users will be able to enjoy Ubuntu on Raspberry Pi devices, with the new release offering optimised Raspberry Pi images for desktop and server.

  • Ubuntu 20.10 Desktop Now Supports the Raspberry Pi 4

    As of the latest release, Raspberry Pi models with 4GB or 8GB RAM can run the Ubuntu 20.10 desktop. Yup, the Groovy Gorilla dishes up support for full-fledged, full-fat desktop version.

    Groovy is but the first foot forward towards a larger goal: an Ubuntu LTS release on the Raspberry Pi, as Eben Upton, CEO at Raspberry Pi, says:

    “From the classic Raspberry Pi board to the industrial grade Compute Module, this first step to an Ubuntu LTS on Raspberry Pi with long term support and security updates matches our commitment to widen access to the very best computing and open source capabilities.”

  • Ubuntu 20.10 rolls out today, along with official support for the Raspberry Pi 4

    While users who want a properly stable base to game with should probably stick to Ubuntu 20.04 which is the long-term support release, the Ubuntu 20.10 'Groovy Gorilla' update is out today.

    For a while there has been a few special Ubuntu flavours that have offered images to install on the Raspberry Pi like Ubuntu MATE, however, that's now becoming official directly within Ubuntu as of the 20.10 release. This is actually awesome, as Ubuntu is one of the easiest Linux distributions to get going with.

    From the press release:

    “In this release, we celebrate the Raspberry Pi Foundation’s commitment to put open computing in the hands of people all over the world,” said Mark Shuttleworth, CEO at Canonical. “We are honoured to support that initiative by optimising Ubuntu on the Raspberry Pi, whether for personal use, educational purposes or as a foundation for their next business venture.”

    “From the classic Raspberry Pi board to the industrial grade Compute Module, this first step to an Ubuntu LTS on Raspberry Pi with long term support and security updates matches our commitment to widen access to the very best computing and open source capabilities” said Eben Upton, CEO of Raspberry Pi Trading.

Ubuntu 20.10 Arrives Today! Here are 11 New Features in Ubuntu 20.10 Groovy Gorilla

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Ubuntu

Ubuntu 20.10 releases today. An Ubuntu fan may get excited about the new features it brings.

Ubuntu 20.10 codenamed Groovy Gorilla is a non-LTS release with nine months of life cycle. You cannot expect drastic changes between subsequent releases.

It doesn’t mean you won’t find new things in Ubuntu 20.10. There are some performance improvements, new Linux kernel and visual changes thanks to the latest release of GNOME 3.38 (and other desktop environments in various other Ubuntu flavors).

Let’s see what new features Ubuntu 20.10 brings.

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Ubuntu Cinnamon Remix Review

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Reviews
Ubuntu

The Ubuntu Cinnamon Remix brings together Linux Mint’s Cinnamon desktop with the Ubuntu Core. While some users are welcoming the new flavor of Ubuntu with open arms, others are scratching their heads, wondering where it fits in.

The main confusion arises when you consider that Cinnamon is the official desktop for Linux Mint, based on Ubuntu. This begs the questions – what is the need for Ubuntu Cinnamon? Why not use Linux Mint, to begin with?

Even though Mint is based on Ubuntu, there are still many significant differences between the two distros. You can go through our in-depth read on Linux Mint vs. Ubuntu to learn about this.

Since Ubuntu Cinnamon uses Ubuntu as its core, it works and feels more like Ubuntu rather than Mint, except for the obvious fact that the GNOME shell is replaced with the Cinnamon desktop.

Furthermore, the developers behind Ubuntu Cinnamon Remix has done an excellent job in translating the Ubuntu aesthetics over to the Cinnamon desktop. You get to see identical icons, the iconic orange color scheme, and the same wallpapers, which helps to retain the same charm.Ubuntu Cinnamon Remix Review

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Groovily Going Ubuntu 20.10 Gorilla

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Ubuntu

Groovy Gorilla is the birth name of Ubuntu 20.10 the next generation computer operating system with latest technology. As its version number suggests, it is the October release this year after the April one 20.04 LTS as traditionally Ubuntu released twice a year since its first inception in 2004. Now I have the chance to see what’s new in Groovy for dear readers who are curious plus how it works on Lenovo ThinkPad. Let’s enjoy!

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F(x)tec Pro1-X Announced – with physical keyboard, Lineage OS and Ubuntu Touch support but dated Snapdragon 835

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OS
Android
Ubuntu
Gadgets

Today, F(x)tec has re-launched their Pro1 smartphone, but renamed as Pro1-X and running LineageOS out of the box combined with compatibility with Ubuntu Touch OS.

The phone has been developed in partnership with XDA, hence the name. The hardware remains the same which includes the dated Qualcomm Snapdragon 835 chipset; however, this phone isn't about raw power, it is a productivity tool with a strong focus on privacy.

It will then combine the chipset with 8GB of RAM a 5.99-inch FHD+ AMOLED display, an 8MP front-facing camera, and a 12MP camera at the rear.

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Debian and Ubuntu Leftovers

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Debian
Ubuntu
  • Steve Kemp: Offsite-monitoring, from my desktop.

    I've been hosting my services with Hetzner (cloud) recently, and their service is generally pretty good. Unfortunately I've started to see an increasing number of false-alarms. I'd have a server in Germany, with the monitoring machine in Helsinki (coincidentally where I live!). For the past month I've started to get pinged with a failure every three/four days on average, "service down - dns failed", or "service down - timeout". When the notice would wake me up I'd go check and it would be fine, it was a very transient failure.

    To be honest the reason for this is my monitoring is just too damn aggressive, I like to be alerted immediately in case something is wrong. That means if a single test fails I get an alert, as rather than only if a test failed for something more reasonable like three+ consecutive failures.

    I'm experimenting with monitoring in a less aggressive fashion, from my home desktop. Since my monitoring tool is a single self-contained golang binary, and it is already packaged as a docker-based container deployment was trivial. I did a little work writing an agent to receive failure-notices, and ping me via telegram - instead of the previous approach where I had an online status-page which I could view via my mobile, and alerts via pushover.

    So far it looks good. I've tweaked the monitoring to setup a timeout of 15 seconds, instead of 5, and I've configured it to only alert me if there is an outage which lasts for >= 2 consecutive failures. I guess the TLDR is I now do offsite monitoring .. from my house, rather than from a different region.

    The only real reason to write this post was mostly to say that the process of writing a trivial "notify me" gateway to interface with telegram was nice and straightforward, and to remind myself that transient failures are way more common than we expect.

  • Video Decoding « etbe - Russell Coker

    I’ve had a saga of getting 4K monitors to work well. My latest issue has been video playing, the dreaded mplayer error about the system being too slow. My previous post about 4K was about using DisplayPort to get more than 30Hz scan rate at 4K [1]. I now have a nice 60Hz scan rate which makes WW2 documentaries display nicely among other things.

    But when running a 4K monitor on a 3.3GHz i5-2500 quad-core CPU I can’t get a FullHD video to display properly. Part of the process of decoding the video and scaling it to 4K resolution is too slow, so action scenes in movies lag. When running a 2560*1440 monitor on a 2.4GHz E5-2440 hex-core CPU with the mplayer option “-lavdopts threads=3” everything is great (but it fails if mplayer is run with no parameters). In doing tests with apparent performance it seemed that the E5-2440 CPU gains more from the threaded mplayer code than the i5-2500, maybe the E5-2440 is more designed for server use (it’s in a Dell PowerEdge T320 while the i5-2500 is in a random white-box system) or maybe it’s just because it’s newer. I haven’t tested whether the i5-2500 system could perform adequately at 2560*1440 resolution.

  • Ubuntu Weekly Newsletter Issue 653

    Welcome to the Ubuntu Weekly Newsletter, Issue 653 for the week of October 11 – 17, 2020. The full version of this issue is available here.

Pop!_OS 20.04 Review: The Best Ubuntu-based Distro!

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Reviews
Ubuntu

The Linux distro world is getting better each day, thanks to developers’ immense dedication. The OS sure has come a long way from people calling it “Complex to use” to “User/Beginner Friendly.” One of the best beginner-friendly distros recommended by almost everyone is Ubuntu. Another distro that has recently taken the Linux universe by storm with its new release is Pop!_OS 20.04; it is developed by System 76, a company that manufactures Laptops and ships them with Linux.

Pop!_OS is a distro based on Ubuntu that has gained popularity lately. After using it extensively for three weeks, it has now become one of my favorite distros of all time. Here’s my review of the same.

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Unity Desktop Review: Good for the Nostalgic Ubuntu Users

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Reviews
Ubuntu

Continuing with our series of Linux Desktop Environment reviews, we’re going back to a classic. The Unity is just as much a blast from the past as MATE. This review covers the Unity Desktop: first impressions, the user experience, some notable features, and some recommendations on who should use it.

When I first boot into Unity, I’m struck by how much it looks like GNOME and Budgie. This makes sense, as Unity is a graphical shell that sits on top of the GNOME Desktop Environment (rather than GNOME Shell), and it does offer some separate features that are different than GNOME Shell.

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More in Tux Machines

Devices/Embedded: MiTAC, Raspberry Pi and ESP32/Arduino

  • Fanless Linux embedded system makes a compact IoT gateway

    ICP Germany has recently introduced the MiTAC ME1-8MD series family of compact, fanless Linux embedded systems powered by NXP i.MX 8M processor and designed to be used as IoT gateways, data acquisition and processing systems, and mini servers. Three models have been launched with a choice of dual or quad-core processors, up to 4GB LPDDR4 RAM, and 32GB eMMC flash storage. The embedded computers also come with up to two Ethernet ports, support up to two displays, and include an internal Raspberry Pi compatible 40 pin GPIO header.

  • Official Raspberry Pi 4 case fan adds cooling to Raspberry Pi 4 case

    When the Raspberry Pi Foundation first introduced the Raspberry Pi 4, they claimed the board would work just fine under most cases without a heatsink, and the latter was only really needed under load. That may have been true when using the board in a temperate climate like in the United Kingdom, but then Raspberry Pi 4 met Thailand with some benchmarks results lower than on a Raspberry Pi 3. People using plastic enclosures had even more troubles. It’s only when I installed a heatsink on Raspberry Pi 4 that the board could really shine. The company also provided some firmware optimizations later on to further cool-down the board. But you can only do much with software, and many third-party cooling solutions such as fansinks or metal cases have been introduced for the popular SBC.

  • Pi-oT 2 IoT module adds 24V digital inputs, RS-485, and UPS to Raspberry Pi (Crowdfunding)

    Pi-oT was launched last year as a Raspberry Pi add-ons designed for commercial and industrial IoT automation. It features 5V I/Os, relays, and ADC inputs suitable for light-duty projects and prototyping. The company, called Edge Devices, has now launched an update with Pi-oT 2 adding optional support for 24V digital inputs, RS-485, and an uninterruptible power supply (UPS).

  • M5Paper ESP32 IoT development kit features a 4.7-inch e-Ink touchscreen display

    M5Stack has just launched its unique and latest core device with a touchscreen e-Ink display. M5Paper ESP32 IoT Development Kit is a fully programmable microcontroller-based platform that can be an ideal choice for your IoT applications. This low-power device could suit such purposes as an industrial controller or smart weather display.

today's howtos

  • Enable Timestamp For History Command In Fish Shell - OSTechNix

    Whenever a command is entered in the terminal, it will be saved at the end of the history file in Linux. You can easily retrieve these commands at any time using history command. The shell is also tracking the timestamp of all command entries, so that we can easily find when a specific command is executed. We already have shown you how to enable timestamp in Bash and Zsh shells. Today we will see how to enable timestamp for history command in Fish shell in Linux. In addition, we will also learn how to create a simple function to show the date and time stamps in history command output in fish shell.

  • Linux: How To Encrypt And Decrypt Files With A Password
  • How to convert pdf to image on Linux command line - nixCraft

    I have many PDF files, and I need to convert them to a png file format, add a border to those images, and convert back all those images to pdf format. How can I convert pdf to image format on Linux and vice versa using the CLI?

  • How To Install PHP 8 on Ubuntu 20.04 LTS - idroot

    In this tutorial, we will show you how to install PHP 8 on Ubuntu 20.04 LTS. For those of you who didn’t know, PHP (recursive acronym for PHP: Hypertext Preprocessor) is a popular server scripting language known for creating dynamic and interactive Web pages. PHP is a widely-used programming language on the Web. This article assumes you have at least basic knowledge of Linux, know how to use the shell, and most importantly, you host your site on your own VPS. The installation is quite simple and assumes you are running in the root account, if not you may need to add ‘sudo‘ to the commands to get root privileges. I will show you through the step by step installation of PHP 8 on Ubuntu 20.04 (Focal Fossa). You can follow the same instructions for Ubuntu 18.04, 16.04, and any other Debian based distribution like Linux Mint.

  • How to Restrict WordPress Site Access - Anto Online

    A lot of the time, you need to restrict access to various users on your website. Whether you’re cordoning premium content, sensitive pages, or content targeted to specific individuals, there are various ways you can restrict user access easily and effectively on your WordPress website. The easiest method is using plugins that you can just download and link with your website. If you have coding skills, you can also edit various functions to achieve the same thing. We shall also take a look at how you can restrict site managers with various levels of access. Whatever kind of site restrictions you need to accomplish, stick with us and we will help you do it.

Linux Kernel: Greg Kroah-Hartman's Talk and Panics

  • Greg Kroah-Hartman: Lessons for Developers from 20 Years of Linux Kernel Work [Ed: "The Linux Foundation is a sponsor of The New Stack" for the latter to write puff pieces such as these, so it's basically marketing]
  • Greg Kroah-Hartman: 'Don't Make Users Mad'

    Kroah-Hartman explains that one of Linus Torvalds' most deeply-held convictions: don't break userspace. "Other operating systems have this rule as well — it's a very solid rule — because we always want you to upgrade. And we want you to upgrade without worrying about it. We don't want you to feel scared. If you see a new release, and we say, 'Hey, this fixes a bunch of problems,' we don't want you to feel worried about taking that. That's really really important — especially with security...." If you do make a change, make sure there truly is a compelling reason. "You have to provide enough reason and enough goodness to force somebody to take the time to learn to do something else. That's very rare." His example of this was systemd, which unified a variety of service configurations and initialization processes. "They did it right. They provided all the functionality, they solved a real problem that was there. They unified all these existing tools and problems in such a way that it was just so much better to use, and it provided enough impetus that everybody was willing to do the work to modify their own stuff and move to the new model. It worked. People still complain about it, but it worked. Everybody switched... It works well. It solves a real problem. "That was an example of how you can provide a compelling reason to move on — and make the change."

  • What to do in case of a Linux kernel panic

    Linux is used everywhere in the IT world. You've probably used Linux today, even if you didn't realize it. If you have learned anything about Linux, then you know it is indeed a kernel. The kernel is the primary unit of the Linux operating system (OS) and is responsible for communications between a computer's hardware and its processes. In this article, you will learn about one situation related to the Linux kernel: The kernel panic. The term itself can make you panic, but if you have the proper knowledge, then you can remain calm. Every system admin faces this issue at least once in their career, but reinstalling the system is not the first solution you should turn to. [...] Now, anytime you see a kernel panic error, you will definitely not panic because you know why this error occurred and how to resolve it. This article covers one of the common Linux boot problems: kernel panic. There are so many other potential boot problems that can occur in Linux, but resolving those issues will become much less of a panic when you gain some advanced knowledge of your system.

Audiocasts/Shows: Apple Hype From the Viewpoint of GNU/Linux

  • The M1 Macbook Pro (From a Linux users perspective) - YouTube

    I have the new Macbook Pro with the M1 CPU in the studio, and I decided to make a video to give you guys my thoughts on it. This is not a super-detailed review, as Mac isn't my platform of choice. Since my primary OS is Linux, I thought it might make for an interesting video.

  • Will Apple's move to ARM lead to Linux Desktop DOMINANCE?
  • Linus Torvalds on Apple M1 Mac, Blender, PulseAudio, 25 Years of GIMP | This Week in Linux 127 - TuxDigital

    On this episode of This Week in Linux, we’ve got a lot of Audio related news this week. We’ve got a new release from the Digital Audio Workstation, Ardour. A new release of PulseAudio, AV Linux, and we’ve got some interesting news from Fedora about potentially switching to PipeWire. In App News this week, we’ll check out the latest release of Blender and celebrate 25 Years of GIMP. Linus Torvalds commented on using Linux on Apple’s new M1 Mac and we’ll round the show out with a new product from Pine64, a soldering iron, and there has been a distro merge between Sabayon and Funtoo. All that and much more coming up right now on Your Weekly Source for Linux GNews!