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Here’s Why Ubuntu Linux 19.10 Feels Insanely Fast And Responsive

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Ubuntu

Despite a number of new features brought to the table by Ubuntu 19.10, the headlining feature is this: it just feels really fast, even compared to Ubuntu 19.04. That comes down to dramatic improvements in GNOME 3.34, the desktop environment used on Ubuntu. And we finally have a wealth of information detailing exactly what those are.

Pop a Live USB of Ubuntu 19.10 into your PC and play around with it for a few minutes. The overall speed and responsiveness will surprise you. After a few minutes you may be tricked into thinking it’s natively installed! That’s largely because of some thoughtful bug hunting and real-time performance improvements contributed to GNOME 3.34 by Canonical.

In a new blog post, Canonical’s Daniel Van Vugt goes into excruciating detail outlining the entire process. For the sake of brevity and to avoid any technical jargon that may make your eyes glaze over, I’ll try to condense this into the most vital points! However, if you want the deep dive, I urge you to read Daniel’s entire post.

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Ubuntu Podcast, Ubuntu at Events and Bauh for Snaps

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Ubuntu
  • Ubuntu Podcast from the UK LoCo: S12E29 – DOOM

    This week we’ve been to UbuCon Europe and preparing for a new baby. We round up the community news including updates from Regolith, Xubuntu, ZFS on Ubuntu, GNOME fighting patent trolls and we discuss some of our news picks from the tech world.

    It’s Season 12 Episode 29 of the Ubuntu Podcast! Alan Pope, Mark Johnson and Martin Wimpress are connected and speaking to your brain.

  • FinTechs discuss security, regulation and innovation at New York City roundtable

    Earlier this month, Canonical, IBM and FinTech specialists Medici held a joint roundtable in New York for executives within the financial services sector to hear and discuss their pain points, the most prominent emerging technologies and what the future holds. Entitled ‘Graduating from FinTech to FinServ’, the roundtable was hosted by Ross Mauri, GM of the IBM Z and LinuxONE business, Canonical’s CEO, Mark Shuttleworth, and Aditya Khurjekar, Founder and CEO of Medici, to discuss the implications and considerations of moving new technologies into products consumed by millions of users. The event followed a week after the launch of IBM’s newest LinuxONE server including support for Ubuntu. Together, IBM and Canonical’s solutions are already jointly used by several companies in the financial services sector.

    Ross and Mark opened the roundtable with their perspectives on the industry which kicked off an engaging discussion among the attendees from established financial institutions and banks to disruptors and start ups. Mark discussed how developers are innovating faster on open source. This pace opens the door for new entrants to enter and gain an advantage, challenging more established banks and institutions. Ross emphasised the importance of advanced security and building infrastructure accordingly.

    As the world increasingly adopts digital assets, secure application environments are essential to safeguard data and encryption keys. Equally with banking systems needing to be ‘always on’, deploying a centralised system is much simpler in the event of a failure. Guest speaker Neil Fillary from Shuttle Holdings spoke about digital asset custody solutions and the need for the underlying infrastructure to be as secure as possible, and Ricardo Correia from R3 discussed his experiences of blockchain deployments in the financial sector and the importance of security.

  • Bauh is a nifty snap manager

    If you’re looking for an easy, non-techie way to install snaps, you want a simple store-like utility. Snap integration is available in both GNOME Software and KDE Discover, which cover a large portion of the Linux user base. However, in distributions and desktop environments that do not natively provide a snap-capable graphical frontend, users typically need to resort to the command-line functionality.

    Previously, we talked about Snaptastic, a snap management tool available in the elementary OS. Today, we’d like to review bauh, formerly known as fpakman, a friendly interface for software installation.

    [...]

    Looking at the project page on GitHub, bauh has an ambitious roadmap ahead. The developers are planning to add support for other packaging technologies not currently in the list, create separate modules for each (this should provide an even more robust management), improve memory utilization and performance, as well as introduce new features that will streamline the user experience.

    For snap users, this is another venue by which they can consume software, on Arch-based distributions in particular. If you’re not keen on the command line, or you don’t want to use the full Snap Store on your desktop, bauh offers a handy, convenient alternative, with multi-format support as an elegant bonus.

  • Canonical at ROSCon Macau 2019

    Hey everyone, listen up, ROSCon 2019 is days away, and the Ubuntu team is going to be there. If you’re coming to Macau be sure to come and say hi at booth 22. Mention reading this blog and get a free high five? It’s going to be an event to remember. If you were at ROSCon JP, you’d know how the community is continuously growing and producing the very best in robotic development. With a vast list of companies and individuals attending this year, the conference floor is going to be buzzing with innovation.

    We, Canonical, the publisher of Ubuntu, will be there demoing several robotic arms to a less than apparent end. We’ll be demonstrating some of the benefits of running snaps on devices and on any ROS projects. We will be equipped with Qualcomm hardware to exhibit how Ubuntu can be used embedded on development boards, and we’ll be there to talk. More than anything, we’ll be there to talk. Like everyone else in attendance we really just want to talk about ROS and see what other kind or Robotics people are working on. If you find some time, enlighten us on your work.

ExTiX 19.10 "The Ultimate Linux System" Is Now Based on Ubuntu 19.10, Runs LXQt

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Linux
Ubuntu

Dubbed by the developer as "The Ultimate Linux System," ExTiX 19.10 is based on Ubuntu 19.10 (Eoan Ermine), but ships with the lightweight LXQt desktop environment instead of GNOME to allow users to use it on their UEFI-enabled computers. ExTiX 19.10 is using the latest LXQt 0.14.1 desktop environment by default.

"ExTiX 19.10 LXQt DVD 64 bit is based on Debian and Ubuntu 19.10. The original system includes the desktop environment GNOME. After removing GNOME I have installed LXQt 0.14.1," said Arne Exton. "This ExTiX LXQt Build is for installation to UEFI-enabled computers."

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System76 Releases Pop!_OS 19.10 with Many Improvements, Based on Ubuntu 19.10

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OS
Ubuntu

Based on Canonical's recently released Ubuntu 19.10 (Eoan Ermine) operating system, Pop!_OS Linux 19.10 ships with the latest GNOME 3.34 desktop environment and introduces a new upgrade process that supports offline upgrades, which will be used from now on to upgrade between Pop!_OS releases.

"When an upgrade becomes available, it is downloaded to your computer. Then, when you decide to upgrade to the newest version of your OS, the upgrade will overwrite the current version of your software. However, this is not to be confused with an automatic update," writes Systems76 on their blog.

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Also: Theme Updates, Offline Upgrades Headline New Additions to Pop!_OS 19.10

Ubuntu Touch OTA-11 Release

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Ubuntu
Gadgets

Kugi has outdone himself this time. With this update you'll find a new way to edit text via the Ubuntu Touch on-screen keyboard: the Advanced Text Functions. Using this feature, you can move around your typed text, undo and redo actions, move around a text selection rectangle, and use the cut/copy/paste commands, all from the same overlay. To get started, press and hold the space bar!

We are still unsure about the discoverability of this feature, so stay tuned for changes that will make it even easier to find and use!

This update also adds the option of a Dvorak keyboard layout for the refined OSK user. The PR included fixes to allow multiple keyboard layouts to share the same correction dictionary and word overrides. Huge thanks, zoenb!

Rounding off the updates to the keyboard are improvements to the Polish layout, removing some diacritics that are not used in the language (Thanks, Daniel20000522!); the same treatment for the French-Swiss layout (Thanks, wilfridd!); and a tweak to the Japanese layout so that it respects your settings better (Thanks, Fuseteam!). If you'd like to get in on the keyboard-improving action, Tallero added instructions for building and testing the keyboard to its Readme at https://github.com/ubports/keyboard-component.

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Also: UBports' Ubuntu Touch OTA-11 Released

Canonical Has a New Ubuntu Desktop Director

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Ubuntu

Martin Wimpress is a name that should be familiar to many of you due to his efforts within the open source and Linux communities.

This includes his leadership of the Ubuntu MATE flavour; his work as a Snapcraft engineer; development on the MATE desktop; involvement in open source events and conferences around the country; and his many podcast activities, including being velvet voiced co-anchor of the Ubuntu UK podcast.

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Ubuntu MATE 19.10 Has Two Awesome New Features For Linux Users

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Ubuntu

The Ubuntu 19.10 upgrade season is officially upon us, and I’ve been dabbling with several of the freshly updated Ubuntu-based distributions this past week. One of those is Ubuntu MATE 19.10, which has a pair of minor but exceptional new features you might appreciate.

You may know this feature as Optimus, and PRIME is Nvidia’s name for the Linux implementation. (Clearly someone over loves Transformers). This allows you to drive your display with one GPU (and thus saving power) while offloading more demanding tasks like gaming to your dedicated Nvidia GPU.

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Canonical Outs New Linux Kernel Security Update for Ubuntu 18.04 and 16.04 LTS

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Linux
Security
Ubuntu

Affecting both the Linux 4.15 kernel used in Ubuntu 18.04 LTS (Bionic Beaver) and Ubuntu 16.04.6 LTS (Xenial Xerus) systems, the new security patch fixed an improperly implemented Spectre mitigation in the ptrace susbsystem (CVE-2019-15902), which could allow a local attacker to expose sensitive information.

It also addresses a buffer overread (CVE-2019-15918) discovered that the SMB networking file system implementation, which could allow an attacker to expose sensitive information (kernel memory), two flaws (CVE-2019-15117 and CVE-2019-15118) discovered in the USB audio driver that may allow a physically proximate attacker to crash the system, and a flaw (CVE-2019-14821) in the KVM hypervisor implementation that let a local attacker to crash the system.

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Ubuntu: 20 Things To Do After Installing Ubuntu 19.10, New Patches, and Extended Security Maintenance (ESM)

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Ubuntu
  • 20 Things To Do After Installing Ubuntu 19.10 ‘Eoan Ermine’

    Ubuntu 19.10 with codename Eoan Ermine is now here and available for install. For those of you who are eager to check the latest Ubuntu version and for all newcomers to the Linux family, we have prepared few tips to help you get started with Ubuntu 19.10 and get what you may need to complete the setup of your desktop/laptop distro.

  • Ubuntu 19.10 (Eoan Ermine) Gets First Linux Kernel Security Patch, Update Now

    Canonical's recently released Ubuntu 19.10 (Eoan Ermine) operating system has received today its first Linux kernel security patch to address an important security vulnerability.

    Released last week on October 17th, Ubuntu 19.10 (Eoan Ermine) brought numerous new features and improvements, including experimental ZFS on root support in the installer, LZ4 initramfs compression for all architectures, up-to-date toolchain, and embedded Nvidia graphics drivers. It also ships with the latest Linux 5.3 kernel series.

  • How Ubuntu Advantage delivers top-notch Linux security

    Every two years in April, a Long Term Support (LTS) release is published. Ubuntu LTS releases are commonly used in enterprise environments, with more than 60% of large-scale production clouds running Ubuntu LTS images.

    Ubuntu 18.04 LTS (Bionic Beaver) is the latest Ubuntu LTS release, with Ubuntu 20.04 LTS coming in April 2020. Each new LTS release is supported for ten years total; five years of standard support, and five additional years of support under Ubuntu Advantage for Infrastructure (UA-I). UA-I provides users and organisations access to key security fixes and patches, including Canonical’s Extended Security Maintenance (ESM) and Kernel Livepatch services.

    Twice every year, in April and October, interim releases are published. They are commonly used by those interested in the latest features and capable of upgrading more frequently.

    Our latest interim release, which arrived last week, is Ubuntu 19.10 (Eoan Ermine). It enhanced capabilities include the latest OpenStack Train release for live-migration assistance, improved security for Kubernetes deployments at the edge and significant updates to desktop performance. Standard support for an interim release is provided for nine months with no additional support extension offered.

Regolith Linux Adds Support for Ubuntu 19.10

Filed under
Linux
Ubuntu

We wrote about Regolith Linux (a distro) and the Regolith desktop (a DE) earlier in the year — and the topic proved incredibly popular with many readers.

So I’m pleased to hear that the Regolith experience is now available on Ubuntu 19.10, aka the latest version of Ubuntu.

While I recommend read our earlier post out for a comprehensive look at what Regolith is, what it offers, and why it’s (imo) pretty cool, I’ll recap the essentials:

Regolith Linux is lightweight Linux distribution based on Ubuntu 19.04 that uses the Regolith desktop by default.

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More in Tux Machines

RedisInsight Revealed and WordPress 5.2.4 Released

  • Redis Labs eases database management with RedisInsight

    The robust market of tools to help users of the Redis database manage their systems just got a new entrant. Redis Labs disclosed the availability of its RedisInsight tool, a graphical user interface (GUI) for database management and operations. Redis is a popular open source NoSQL database that is also increasingly being used in cloud-native Kubernetes deployments as users move workloads to the cloud. Open source database use is growing quickly according to recent reports as the need for flexible, open systems to meet different needs has become a common requirement. Among the challenges often associated with databases of any type is ease of management, which Redis is trying to address with RedisInsight.

  • WordPress 5.2.4 Update

    Late-breaking news on the 5.2.4 short-cycle security release that landed October 14. When we released the news post, I inadvertently missed giving props to Simon Scannell of RIPS Technologies for finding and disclosing an issue where path traversal can lead to remote code execution. Simon has done a great deal of work on the WordPress project, and failing to mention his contributions is a huge oversight on our end. Thank you to all of the reporters for privately disclosing vulnerabilities, which gave us time to fix them before WordPress sites could be attacked.

Desktop GNU/Linux: Rick and Morty, Georges Basile Stavracas Neto on GNOME and Linux Format on Eoan Ermine

  • We know where Rick (from Rick and Morty) stands on Intel vs AMD debate

    For one, it appears Rick is running a version of Debian with a very old Linux kernel (3.2.0) — one dating back to 2012. He badly needs to install some frickin’ updates. “Also his partitions are real weird. It’s all Microsoft based partitions,” a Redditor says. “A Linux user would never do [this] unless they were insane since NTFS/Exfat drivers on Linux are not great.”

  • Georges Basile Stavracas Neto: Every shell has a story

    … a wise someone once muttered while walking on a beach, as they picked up a shell lying on the sand. Indeed, every shell began somewhere, crossed a unique path with different goals and driven by different motivations. Some shells were created to optimize for mobility; some, for lightness; some, for speed; some were created to just fit whoever is using it and do their jobs efficiently. It’s statistically close to impossible to not find a suitable shell, one could argue. So, is this a blog about muttered shell wisdom? In some way, it actually is. It is, indeed, about Shell, and about Mutter. And even though “wisdom” is perhaps a bit of an overstatement, it is expected that whoever reads this blog doesn’t leave it less wise, so the word applies to a certain degree. Evidently, the Shell in question is composed of bits and bytes; its protection is more about the complexities of a kernel and command lines than sea predators, and the Mutter is actually more about compositing the desktop than barely audible uttering.

  • Adieu, 32

    The tenth month of the year arrives and so does a new Ubuntu 19.10 (Eoan Ermine) update. Is it a portent that this is the 31st release of Ubuntu and with the 32nd release next year, 32-bit x86 Ubuntu builds will end?

Linux Kernel and Linux Foundation

  • Linux's Crypto API Is Adopting Some Aspects Of Zinc, Opening Door To Mainline WireGuard

    Mainlining of the WireGuard secure VPN tunnel was being held up by its use of the new "Zinc" crypto API developed in conjunction with this network tech. But with obstacles in getting Zinc merged, WireGuard was going to be resorting to targeting the existing kernel crypto interfaces. Instead, however, it turns out the upstream Linux crypto developers were interested and willing to incorporate some elements of Zinc into the existing kernel crypto implementation. Back in September is when Jason Donenfeld decided porting WireGuard to the existing Linux crypto API was the best path forward for getting this secure networking functionality into the mainline kernel in a timely manner. But since then other upstream kernel developers working on the crypto subsystem ended up with patches incorporating some elements of Zinc's design.

  • zswap: use B-tree for search
    The current zswap implementation uses red-black trees to store
    entries and to perform lookups. Although this algorithm obviously
    has complexity of O(log N) it still takes a while to complete
    lookup (or, even more for replacement) of an entry, when the amount
    of entries is huge (100K+).
    
    B-trees are known to handle such cases more efficiently (i. e. also
    with O(log N) complexity but with way lower coefficient) so trying
    zswap with B-trees was worth a shot.
    
    The implementation of B-trees that is currently present in Linux
    kernel isn't really doing things in the best possible way (i. e. it
    has recursion) but the testing I've run still shows a very
    significant performance increase.
    
    The usage pattern of B-tree here is not exactly following the
    guidelines but it is due to the fact that pgoff_t may be both 32
    and 64 bits long.
    
    
  • Zswap Could See Better Performance Thanks To A B-Tree Search Implementation

    For those using Zswap as a compressed RAM cache for swapping on Linux systems, the performance could soon see a measurable improvement. Developer Vitaly Wool has posted a patch that switches the Zswap code from using red-black trees to a B-tree for searching. Particularly for when having to search a large number of entries, the B-trees implementation should do so much more efficiently.

  • AT&T Finally Opens Up dNOS "DANOS" Network Operating System Code

    One and a half years late, the "DANOS" (known formerly as "dNOS") network operating system is now open-source under the Linux Foundation. AT&T and the Linux Foundation originally announced their plan in early 2018 wish pushing for this network operating system to be used on more mobile infrastructure. At the time they expected it to happen in H2'2018, but finally on 15 November 2019 the goal came to fruition.

Security Patches and FUD/Drama