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Ubuntu

How Canonical remotely delivers and supports customer cloud deployments

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Ubuntu

The widespread shift to remote working in response to the COVID-19 pandemic has been a disruptive change for countless businesses; some 13% of organisations say they have faced major disruption (1). But at Canonical, remote working has long been the status quo for many of our teams. In spite of the challenging circumstances in which we all find ourselves, Canonical has been able to continue to operate and support our customers despite their working practices undergoing significant changes. Here’s some of our observations and learnings to date.

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10 Best Ubuntu-based Linux Distributions

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Linux
Ubuntu

Ubuntu is arguably one of the most popular and widely-used Linux distribution owing to its classic UI, stability, user-friendliness, and a rich repository that contains over 50,000 software packages. Furthermore, it comes highly recommended for beginners who are trying to give a shot at Linux.

In addition, Ubuntu is supported by a vast community of dedicated opensource developers who actively maintain contribute to its development to deliver up-to-date software packages, updates, and bug-fixes.

There are numerous flavors based on Ubuntu, and a common misconception is that they are all the same. While they may be based on Ubuntu, each flavor ships with its own unique style and variations to make it stand out from the rest.

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Top 7 Screenshot Tools for Ubuntu Desktop

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Ubuntu

Looking for screen capturing application for your Ubuntu desktop? Here are 7 popular graphical tools you can try.

There are also many other screenshot tools (e.g., KDE Spectacle, Deepin screenshot, xfce4-screenshooter, lximage-qt) that are either not desktop independent, or not working good in my case.

So the previous 7 tools are the best for Ubuntu so far in 2020 in my private opinion.

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Ubuntu 20.10 (Groovy Gorilla) Is Now Powered by Linux Kernel 5.8

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Ubuntu

It finally happened! The Linux 5.8 kernel packages have landed today in the main archives of Ubuntu 20.10, due for release next month on October 22nd. Until today, they were kept in the proposed repositories for a few weeks now, most probably to ensure proper testing.

I have already foreseen that Ubuntu 20.10 will be shipping with Linux kernel 5.8 by default as there’s no other kernel Canonical’s Ubuntu development team could have used for the final release.

Development kicked off, as usual, based on the previous Ubuntu release. In this case, Ubuntu 20.04 LTS (Focal Fossa) and Linux kernel 5.4 LTS, which is supported until year 2025. But, Ubuntu 20.10 being a testbed for Canonical to experiment with new features for the next LTS release, it will be using a newer kernel.

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Canonical announces new point releases - Ubuntu 20.04.1 and 18.04.5

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Ubuntu

Canonical have released both the first point release of Ubuntu 20.04 Long-Term Support (LTS) as Ubuntu 20.04.1 and the fifth point release of Ubuntu 18.04 Long-Term Support (LTS) as Ubuntu 18.04.5.

I’ve respun the desktop ISOs using my ‘isorespin.sh‘ script and created ISOs suitable for Intel Atom and Intel Apollo Lake devices...

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Between Ubuntu 20.04 and openSUSE Leap 15.2 Releases

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SUSE
Ubuntu

This year 2020 is amazing as two big European computer operating systems come out. They are Ubuntu and openSUSE more precisely version Focal Fossa and Leap 15.2. They are ranked number 4th and 13th on Distrowatch.com.This article sums up these two for everyone to quickly download or purchase a computer with them.

The leading operating system for PCs, IoT devices, servers and the cloud.

The makers' choice for sysadmins, developers and desktop users.

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HP’s Powerful New Laptops Are Certified for Ubuntu 20.04 LTS

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Ubuntu

I’ll warn you up front that these portable powerhouses aren’t cheap — prices start from $1,989 — but these machines are now available to buy full certified for Ubuntu 20.04 LTS across a mesmerisingly mammoth range of configurations.

While I’m not familiar with HP workstations their marketing reliably informs me that the Z-series Fury line is built to shoulder workloads from data scientists, engineers, and creative professionals.

I.e. these notebooks are designed to do more than help you just couch-stalk old crushes on Facebook.

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Audacity 2.4.2 PPA is back for Ubuntu 20.04 / 18.04

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Ubuntu

This simple tutorial shows how to install the latest Audacity 2.4.2 via PPA in Ubuntu 20.04, Ubuntu 18.04, and Linux Mint 20.

Audacity audio editor 2.4.x was missing from the unofficial PPA for a few months, due to build system change and my poor debian packaging skill.

Since the upstream maintainer has built the 2.4.2 package for Debian unstable and Ubuntu 20.10, backports for Ubuntu 20.04 and Ubuntu 18.04 now are here for you!

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Ubuntu Linux 20.10 Groovy Gorilla Beta is coming soon

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Ubuntu

The popular Ubuntu Linux gets two new versions a year, with one coming in April, and the other in October. Its version numbering scheme is based on year (YY), a period, and the month (MM). For instance, the most recent stable version was released this past April and it is numbered as 20.04. In addition, Canonical (the operating system's owner) assigns names -- sequentially and alphabetically. The alphanumeric code name is always based on two words starting with the same sequential letter -- an adjective followed by an animal name. The aforementioned 20.04 is named "Focal Fossa."

Obviously, the next version of Ubuntu will be numbered 20.10, and it will be given a two-word code name based on the letter "G." This time, the operating system will be called "Groovy Gorilla." Thankfully, development of the operating system seems to be on schedule, as it recently received a feature freeze. What does this mean? Essentially, moving forward, Ubuntu 20.10 should only receive bug fixes -- no more features will be introduced unless by exception. It also signals that the upcoming Beta release should be released on schedule as expected.

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Also: FIPS certification and CIS compliance with Ubuntu

Create A Wifi Hotspot on Ubuntu

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Ubuntu

This tutorial explains easy steps to create wifi hotspot on Ubuntu laptop. With this you can share an internet access with friends and your other devices. It is very simple everyone can do. You don't need to install any application nor using terminal. This is based on Focal Fossa but certainly you can practice on prior or later versions too as long as their desktop is GNOME 3 such as Bionic Beaver or Groovy Gorilla versions. Happy sharing!

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More in Tux Machines

Septor 2020.5

Tor Browser is fully installed (10.0.2) System upgrade from Debian Buster repos as of October 21, 2020 Update Linux Kernel to 5.9.0-1 Update Thunderbird to 78.3.1-2 Update Tor to 0.4.4.5 Update Youtube-dl to 2020.09.20 Read more

Incremental backup with Butterfly Backup

This article explains how to make incremental or differential backups, with a catalog available to restore (or export) at the point you want, with Butterfly Backup. Read more

Regressions in GNU/Linux Evolution

  • When "progress" is backwards

    Lately I see many developments in the linux FOSS world that sell themselves as progress, but are actually hugely annoying and counter-productive. Counter-productive to a point where they actually cause major regressions, costs, and as in the case of GTK+3 ruin user experience and the possibility that we'll ever enjoy "The year of the Linux desktop". [...] We live in an era where in the FOSS world one constantly has to relearn things, switch to new, supposedly "better", but more bloated solutions, and is generally left with the impression that someone is pulling the rug from below one's feet. Many of the key changes in this area have been rammed through by a small set of decision makers, often closely related to Red Hat/Gnome/freedesktop.org. We're buying this "progress" at a high cost, and one can't avoid asking oneself whether there's more to the story than meets the eye. Never forget, Red Hat and Microsoft (TM) are partners and might even have the same shareholders.

  • When "progress" is backwards

Graphics: Vulkan, Intel and AMD

  • NVIDIA Ships Vulkan Driver Beta With Fragment Shading Rate Control - Phoronix

    This week's Vulkan 1.2.158 spec release brought the fragment shading rate extension to control the rate at which fragments are shaded on a per-draw, per-primitive, or per-region basis. This can be useful similar to OpenGL and Direct3D support for helping to allow different, less important areas of the screen be shaded less than areas requiring greater detail/focus. NVIDIA on Tuesday released the 455.26.02 Linux driver (and 457.00 version for Windows) that adds this fragment shading rate extension.

  • Intel Begins Adding Alder Lake Graphics Support To Their Linux Driver - Phoronix

    Intel has begun adding support for Alderlake-S to their open-source Linux kernel graphics driver. An initial set of 18 patches amounting to just around 300 lines of new kernel code was sent out today for beginning the hardware enablement work on Alderlake-S from the graphics side. Yes, it's only a few hundred lines of new driver code due to Alder Lake leveraging the existing Gen12/Tigerlake support. The Alder Lake driver patches similarly re-use some of the same workarounds and changes as set for the 14nm Rocket Lake processors with Gen12 graphics coming out in Q1.

  • AMD Linux Driver Preparing For A Navi "Blockchain" Graphics Card - Phoronix

    While all eyes are on the AMD Radeon RX 6000 "Big Navi" graphics cards set to be announced next week, it also looks like AMD is preparing for a Navi 1x "Blockchain" graphics card offering given the latest work in their open-source Linux driver. Patches posted today provide support for a new Navi graphics card referred to as the "navi10 blockchain SKU." The Navi 10 part has a device ID of 0x731E. From the AMDGPU Linux kernel driver perspective, the only difference from the existing Navi 10 GPU support is these patches disable the Display Core Next (DCN) and Video Core Next (VCN) support with this new SKU not having any display support.