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Ubuntu

Ubuntu Linux 20.10 Groovy Gorilla Beta is coming soon

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Ubuntu

The popular Ubuntu Linux gets two new versions a year, with one coming in April, and the other in October. Its version numbering scheme is based on year (YY), a period, and the month (MM). For instance, the most recent stable version was released this past April and it is numbered as 20.04. In addition, Canonical (the operating system's owner) assigns names -- sequentially and alphabetically. The alphanumeric code name is always based on two words starting with the same sequential letter -- an adjective followed by an animal name. The aforementioned 20.04 is named "Focal Fossa."

Obviously, the next version of Ubuntu will be numbered 20.10, and it will be given a two-word code name based on the letter "G." This time, the operating system will be called "Groovy Gorilla." Thankfully, development of the operating system seems to be on schedule, as it recently received a feature freeze. What does this mean? Essentially, moving forward, Ubuntu 20.10 should only receive bug fixes -- no more features will be introduced unless by exception. It also signals that the upcoming Beta release should be released on schedule as expected.

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Also: FIPS certification and CIS compliance with Ubuntu

Create A Wifi Hotspot on Ubuntu

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Ubuntu

This tutorial explains easy steps to create wifi hotspot on Ubuntu laptop. With this you can share an internet access with friends and your other devices. It is very simple everyone can do. You don't need to install any application nor using terminal. This is based on Focal Fossa but certainly you can practice on prior or later versions too as long as their desktop is GNOME 3 such as Bionic Beaver or Groovy Gorilla versions. Happy sharing!

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Ubuntu 20.10 (Groovy Gorilla) Enters Feature Freeze, Beta Expected on October 1st

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Ubuntu

Steve Langasek announced that the Ubuntu 20.10 release has entered Feature Freeze this week, more specifically as of August 27th, 2020. This is actually the most important milestone so far in the development cycle of Ubuntu 20.10 and it means that no new features will be implemented until the final release.

Dubbed “Groovy Gorilla,” Ubuntu 20.10 has been in development since April 2020, shortly after the release of the Ubuntu 20.04 LTS (Focal Fossa) operating system. The Feature Freeze stage will be followed by an optional Ubuntu Testing Week that kicks off next week on September 3rd for those who want to help with the testing.

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Ubuntu Touch OTA-13 Is Coming on September 4th with Support for Many New Devices

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Ubuntu

It’s been 4 months since OTA-12 arrived with the Lomiri (Unity 8) interface, which introduced new functionality and interaction models, including the Application Drawer. Lomiri is a continuation of the Unity 8 UI developed by Canonical for its Ubuntu operating system to provide convergence.

But enough history and let’s have a look into the future, as Ubuntu Touch OTA-13 promises to be yet another hefty update for Linux phone users. Two major features are present in the upcoming release, ARM64 and Halium 7 support.

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Ubuntu 20.04 Summary for Everyone

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Ubuntu

Here you find summary all our works on Ubuntu 20.04 from Download Links to Installation Guide from Reviews to Apps Recommendations plus Beginner's Guide in one place. For us facing pandemic right now, there is even Corona Kit to help remote works with only Free Software. This summary also covers six Official Flavors from Kubuntu to Ubuntu Budgie. For everyone who wants to know Focal Fossa this summary is really for you. Enjoy!

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Ubuntu To Try Again In Switching IPTables To Use Nftables Backend

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Security
Ubuntu

Back during the Ubuntu 20.04 cycle there was an attempt to switch the iptables back-end to Nftables by default. That plan was ultimately foiled by LXD at the time running into issues and other fallout. But now t hat those issues should be addressed and Debian Buster has switched to Nftables, the move is being re-attempted next week for Ubuntu 20.10.

Distributions like Fedora already switched to Nftables in the past, Debian is now on it, and Ubuntu 20.10 should be ready for it. Nftables as a packet filtering/classification framework for filtering network traffic is very stable at this point and addresses issues with IPTables. Nftables is generally regarded as being faster than IPTables, provide better rule-set handling, API benefits, more extensible, and other advantages. Ubuntu To Try Again In Switching IPTables To Use Nftables Backend

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Travel, CLIs, and sticky notes: Lilyana’s life as a Canonical UX designer

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Interviews
Ubuntu

Canonical is at the forefront of open source, which is a field I’ve always been interested in, and I feel that it’s a company that is trying to do something good for the world. A while ago, I spoke with a user who looks after a fairly large server lab at a London University. He told me that if MAAS – our Metal-as-a-Service solution – wasn’t open source and completely free to use, they wouldn’t be able to maintain that lab and continue their research. Canonical really is an enabler on a global scale, which I like.

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Linux Mint 20 Cinnamon Edition – Based on Ubuntu 20.04 LTS and Features Cinnamon 4.6

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Linux
Ubuntu

Linux Mint Team has been released and announced the latest long-term support (LTS) version of its popular desktop Linux desktop, Linux Mint 20, “Ulyana.” This edition, based on Canonical’s Ubuntu 20.04 LTS (Focal Fossa) operating system.

Linux Mint 20 offers users long-term support with security updates until 2025, improved support for Nvidia GPUs and Nvidia Optimus, /home directory encryption, and a new file sharing app with an encryption called Warpinator.

Also, features better resolution in VirtualBox, improvements to the system tray icons with HiDPI support, improvements to the Mint-Y theme on all editions, enablement of APT recommends by default for newly installed packages, Linux kernel 5.4 LTS and a revamped Gdebi tool to make installing of .deb packages easier.

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Give Ubuntu’s Default Theme a Makeover with Yaru Colors

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Ubuntu

Yaru Colors is a fully-fledged customisation script capable for changing the colour highlight used in Yaru — plus a fair bit more, which we’ll get to in a second.

Now I will warn you straight up that this task, easy though it sounds, is a bit different to installing other Linux icon themes and GTK themes. Rather than you manually moving folders into places there’s an install script to take care of the process.

Also: don’t confuse Yaru Colors with Folder Colors. The latter tool lets you change the colour of individual folder icons on a per-folder basis, whereas this tool changes the colour of all folder icons.

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Memory Comparison of Ubuntu 20.04, Latest Linux Mint and Fedora

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Linux
Red Hat
Ubuntu

Expanding my previous memory comparisons, now I present you Ubuntu Focal Fossa, Mint Ulyana, and Fedora 32 the three most famous operating systems which are always in top ten Distrowatch rank and released just recently in 2020. In the same time I compare respectively two desktop environments loved by the community namely GNOME and Cinnamon. All pictures above are in full size so simply click one to view it bigger. I hope this helps everyone choosing right distro and right desktop environment from many choices of GNU/Linux. Enjoy!

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Debian and Ubuntu Leftovers

  • dnsZoneEntry: field should be removed when DD is retired

    When Debian Developer had retired, actual DNS entry is removed, but dnsZoneEntry: field is kept on LDAP (db.debian.org) So you can not reuse *.debian.net if retired Debian Developer owns your prefered subdomain already.

  • Canonical have announced a new point release for Ubuntu 16.04 LTS - 16.04.7 (Xenial Xerus)

    Canonical have released the sixth point release of Ubuntu 16.04 Long-Term Support (LTS) as Ubuntu 16.04.7.

  • Ubuntu Weekly Newsletter Issue 650

    Welcome to the Ubuntu Weekly Newsletter, Issue 650 for the week of September 20 – 26, 2020. The full version of this issue is available here.

  • Canonical at OSM Hackfest MR#9

    The 12th OSM Hackfest, or OSM mid-release NINE (MR#9) Hackfest, is one for the books and Canonical happily shared the presenter floor with the rest of the Open Source MANO (OSM) community. The event spanned the whole week from September 7th to 11th, with Wednesday September 9th afternoon being used for the OSM Ecosystem day. As per the last two hackfests, the remote format allowed participation of hundreds of enthusiasts. During the preparation of the hackfest, it was agreed to keep the same theme as the last one, so participants were able to use OSM to manage and orchestrate workloads in an end-to-end open source mobile network solution with the Facebook Connectivity project; Magma. [...] David Garcia, the N2VC MDL, had multiple sessions during day 2; an introduction to OSM primitives, Juju relations and a 3 hour workshop on OSM orchestration of VNFs. OSM uses Juju as a core component and leverages operators to drive lifecycle management, workload configuration, daily operations and integration functions. Juju is a universal operator lifecycle manager (OLM) that exposes events to the operators and enables users to deploy simple to complex models of applications declaring business intent instead of dealing with piles of configuration scripts. [...] The Ecosystem Day, an integral part of every hackfest, is for the community to learn about vendor-oriented solutions and projects. Among others, we had a demo of 5G Core network automation by OSM from Ulak Communications, we learned about vBNG orchestration using Juju by Benu networks and subscription and notification support in OSM by Tata ELXSI. We also presented a session on Charmed OSM, Canonical’s carrier-grade, hardened OSM distribution. Charmed OSM allows operators, GSIs and NEPs to move faster with NFV transformation through open-source technology and partner programmes.

Android Leftovers

Initial Fedora 32 vs. Fedora 33 Beta Benchmarks Point To Slightly Higher Performance

In addition to Fedora Workstation 33 switching to Btrfs, there are a number of key components updated in Fedora 33 as well as finally enabling link-time optimizations (LTO) for package builds that make this next Fedora Linux installment quite interesting from a performance perspective. Here are some initial benchmarks of Fedora Workstation 32 against the Fedora Workstation 33 Beta on an Intel Core i9 10900K system. Given the Fedora 33 beta release, here are our initial benchmarks of Fedora 33 that is due for its official release in late October. Over the past few days I've been testing the test compose of Fedora 33 Beta with all updates applied -- it's been quite a nice experience. There hasn't been any show-stopping bugs and all-around running nicely. Read more

Second Beta out for Krita 4.4.0

Today, we’re releasing Krita 4.4.0 beta 2: we found a number of regressions and release blocking bugs. This beta has Android builds too, since we fixed many issues with accessing files on Android: however, because we now add translations the APK files are too big for the Play Store, and you will have to download them from download.kde.org Read more