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Ubuntu

15 Things To Do After Installing Ubuntu 17.04 "Zesty Zapus"

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Linux
Ubuntu

Well, last month Canonical released a new version of Ubuntu which is version 17.04. This will be the last version with unity and canonical will be switch back to GNOME. If you are that kind of person that likes to have everything updated to the latest version you should consider upgrading. If you are LTS kind of person, just keep using your LTS version and wait for 18.04 LTS. Below are some tips to do after installing Ubuntu 17.04.

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Ubuntu-Based Alternatives and Snapcraft 2.30

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Ubuntu
  • ​How to install Linux Mint on your Windows PC

    I think Linux Mint isn't just a great desktop, it's a great replacement for Windows. With Windows security problems such as WannaCry, people are starting to explore alternatives to Windows.

    I got a number of requests about switching out from Windows to the latest and best Linux. For me and many other experienced Linux users that's Linux Mint 18.1. You don't need to be a Linux expert to install Mint on a Windows PC. Here's how to do it.

  • Distro watch for Ubuntu lovers: What's ahead in Linux land

    With the death of Unity, Canonical will focus more attention on Ubuntu servers, Ubuntu in the cloud and Ubuntu in the so-called Internet of Things.

    Even if you give Canonical the benefit of the doubt - that it will continue working on desktop Ubuntu - at the very least, desktop Ubuntu's future looks uncertain.

    Post Unity, how will the transition to GNOME work? Will existing Unity users be "upgraded" to GNOME with 17.10? Canonical is reportedly plotting out solutions to much of this uncertainty right now, but for users, the uncertainty rules the day.

  • Canonical Releases Snapcraft 2.30 Snappy Packaging Tool for Ubuntu Linux OSes

    Canonical's Sergio Schvezov was proud to announce the release and immediate availability of Snapcraft 2.30, a major milestone of the open-source Snappy packaging tool used to package apps in the Snap universal binary format.

Ubuntu Leftovers: Security, Unity, Internet, and Derivatives

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Ubuntu

The History of Ubuntu Linux, Canonical's Open Source OS

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Ubuntu

In October 2004 the first Ubuntu release, Ubuntu 4.10, debuted. Codenamed Warty Warthog because it was rough around the edges, Ubuntu 4.10 inaugurated a tradition of releasing new version of Ubuntu each April and October that Canonical has maintained up to the present -- with the exception of Ubuntu 6.06, which came out a couple of months late in 2006.

Ubuntu 4.04 launched six months after Mark Shuttleworth first met with Debian developers to discuss the creation of a new, Debian-based Linux distribution that would emphasize ease-of-use, regular release cycles, accessibility and internationalization.

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Lubuntu Vs. Xubuntu

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Ubuntu

​Over the years, Lubuntu and Xubuntu have been two popular flavors that have provided an alternative to a lot of folks who have preferred something other than vanilla Ubuntu with the Unity desktop. Lubuntu and Xubuntu have been the choice of Linux enthusiasts and users who would rather have a lean or lightweight Linux distro or one that will provide the best performance on an old desktop or laptop. But how do these two distros compare, which one would I recommend and why? Let’s read along as I weigh the strengths and weaknesses of these two awesome Ubuntu flavors.

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Also:

  • Canonical Releases New Kernel Security Update for Ubuntu 16.10, 16.04 and 14.04

    After patching six vulnerabilities in the kernel packages of the Ubuntu 17.04 (Zesty Zapus) operating system, Canonical also updated the kernels of the Ubuntu 16.10 (Yakkety Yak), Ubuntu 16.04 LTS (Xenial Xerus) and Ubuntu 14.04 LTS (Trusty Tahr).

    Only the kernel packages of the Ubuntu 16.04 LTS and 16.04.1 LTS releases received the most attention in this new update, addressing a stack-based buffer overflow (CVE-2017-7187) issue discovered by Dmitry Vyukov in Linux kernel's generic SCSI (sg) subsystem, which lets local attackers that had access to an sg device to crash the affected system or execute random code.

  • NHS mulling Ubuntu switch after Windows XP fail?

    The NHS could be considering switching its software infrastructure from Windows to Ubuntu, after Windows XP vulnerabilities were exploited in the recent cyber attack that crippled the National Health Service. Or is it just an elaborate gag?

Ubuntu Leftovers

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Ubuntu

Emmabuntus 3 1.04 Linux Distro Officially Released, Based on Xubuntu 14.04.1 LTS

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Ubuntu

Patrick Emmabuntus is pleased to inform us today about the release and immediate availability of the Emmabuntus 3 1.04 update of the educational-oriented GNU/Linux distribution based on Xubuntu and the Xfce desktop environment.

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MATE 1.16.2 Desktop Environment Is Now Available for Ubuntu MATE 16.04.2 LTS

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Ubuntu

Ubuntu MATE project leader Martin Wimpress announced today the availability of the MATE 1.16.2 desktop environment in the special PPA (Personal Package Archive) created for users of the Ubuntu MATE 16.04.2 LTS (Xenial Xerus) operating system.

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Ubuntu on Laptops

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GNU
Linux
Ubuntu
  • Installing Ubuntu on Dell Inspiron 7559

    While that is happening prepare your install USB stick for Ubuntu 16.04 LTS. Just as a note, I tried using Ubuntu 17.04 but had issues with the desktop locking up. Unity8 briefly worked but then it too froze. So I reverted back to 16.04 as the default. I suspect you can get 17.04 running if you put on the server version, and then manually install the desktop and configure the graphics and so forth and want to spend the extra time in resolving things.

    Once the Windows 10 is complete (allow several hours for that) then you need to do 2 steps. First run the Windows disk defragment utility to compress down the file system. Then run the disk manager utility and shrink down the partition. I was able to shrink it to 250GB, leaving 760GB for installing Ubuntu.

  • Review - 2017 System76 Galago Pro Ultrabook

    In this video I review the latest laptop from System76, the Galago Pro! Released in 2017, the Galago Pro aims to be a first-class Linux Ultrabook. Check it out in this review. This laptop was purchased with my own money, and was not sponsored in any way by System76.

  • [System76] GNOME!

    The Pop theme can be installed via our PPA for Ubuntu 16.04 and 17.04. It works with both Unity and GNOME though our focus will be on the GNOME experience.

GNU/Linux Review: Ubuntu MATE 17.04 Zesty Zapus

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Reviews
Ubuntu

Ubuntu MATE 17.04 has been released at April 13th 2017. Here is a review for this user-friendly, desktop-oriented operating system with highly customizable interface and complete set of software. It keeps the same user-experience from the old Ubuntu GNOME2 era while also providing 4 other desktop layout choices (that resemble OS X, Windows, and Unity plus a Netbook-friendly look) and user can transform between them anytime. With only around 550MB of RAM idle use and the latest MATE 1.18, Ubuntu MATE 17.04 becomes an ultimate desktop choice for everyone. I hope you'll enjoy this review and be comfortable with 17.04.

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Linux 4.12 RC3, Linux Foundation Project Updates

  • Linux 4.12-rc3
    Hey, things continue to look good, and rc3 isn't even very big. I'm hoping there's not another shoe about to drop, but so far this really feels like a nice calm release cycle, despite the size of the merge window. Knock wood. Anyway, rc3 has a little bit of everything. The biggest single change is actually just a documentation update (the intel pstate docs were converted to rst format), so the diffstat actually looks a bit odd with a wuarter just being documentation. There's also some tooling updates (perf and some bpf selftest). But if you ignore those two pieces, it looks pretty normal: two thirds of it being drivers (gpu, nvme, scsi, tty, block), with the remainder being about half networking and haf "misc" (core kernel, header files, XFS, arch updates). Go forth and test, Linus
  • Linux 4.12-rc3 Kernel Released
    Linus Torvalds has announced the third weekly test candidate for the upcoming Linux 4.12 kernel debut. Linus commented of Linux 4.12-rc3 that it isn't a very big release over the prior RCs and so far it's a "nice calm release cycle." The biggest change this past week was actually documentation updates.
  • Linus Torvalds Announced the Third Release Candidate of the Linux 4.12 Kernel
    Even if it's Memorial weekend, Linus Torvalds is on the job announcing the release and immediate availability of the third RC (Release Candidate) milestone of the upcoming Linux 4.12 kernel series.
  • Hyperledger Sawtooth Graduates to Active Status
    We’re happy to share that Hyperledger’s Technical Steering Committee (TSC) has granted the Hyperledger Sawtooth maintainer’s request to advance the project’s status from Incubation to Active. Hyperledger Iroha also graduated today.
  • Stronger Together: How Cloud Foundry Supports Other Communities
    The open source Cloud Foundry application development platform was publicly announced over six years ago, and along the way, we have connected with other projects, adopting technologies from other open source communities as they matured. For example, before Docker was a company or even a project, the Cloud Foundry platform was using Linux containers to isolate deployed applications from one another. Our container implementation wasn’t built in a general purpose way like Docker’s; it wasn’t designed to solve all of the potential use cases for a container runtime. It was designed specifically to support the stateless web applications that Cloud Foundry was initially intended to support, and to do that in a secure, multitenant fashion.

Reasons to use the GNOME 3 desktop environment, cool KDE tweaks, and GNOME integration for Qt based application

  • 11 reasons to use the GNOME 3 desktop environment for Linux
    Late last year, an upgrade to Fedora 25 caused issues with the new version of KDE Plasma that made it difficult for me to get any work done. So I decided to try other Linux desktop environments for two reasons. First, I needed to get my work done. Second, having been using KDE exclusively for many years, I thought it might be time to try some different desktops.
  • Which Linux desktop environment do you prefer?
  • 7 cool KDE tweaks that will change your life
  • Gnome integration for Qt based applications in Flatpak
    Following blog post from Patrick Griffis about new themes support in Flatpak, we started working on supporting this new feature too. Currently wherever you start a Qt application, it would always look like a KDE application or something would be missing, like icons so you would end up with bad experience and mixed feelings. This is going to change now as we now support Gnome in form of icons, widget style and Qt platform theme and with this, when you run a Qt application in Gnome, it will look definitely better and more natively than before. We packaged regular adwaita icons which are used by default in Gnome as extension of freedesktop runtime. For widget style we use adwaita-qt style, which is a Qt style attempting to look like Gtk’s adwaita and the most important part putting this all together is QGnomePlatform, a Qt platform theme which reads your Gnome configuration and applies it to running Qt applications. QGnomePlatform also enforces Qt apps to use adwaita icons and adwaita-qt style by default so that’s another reason why it is important. Both adwaita-qt and QGnomePlatform projects are by the way authored by Martin Bříza, a collegue of mine from Red Hat so if you meet him in person somewhere buy him a beer for that he cares about Qt integration in Gnome :). Now coming to a question how to install this and make it work. Basically all you need to do is install following extensions and you shold be done:

Returning to the Void

Void is an independently developed, rolling release Linux distribution. The Void distribution runs on 32-bit and 64-bit x86 processors as well as several ARM boards including the Raspberry Pi, BeagleBone and Cubieboard2. The Void distribution is available in Cinnamon, Enlightenment, LXDE, LXQt, MATE and Xfce editions with some additional desktop environments offered through the project's software repositories. There is also a plain edition which I believe sets up a minimal command line environment. There are a number of features which set Void apart from most other Linux distributions. Void uses the XBPS package manager for working with source and binary packages. Void was an early adopter of OpenBSD's LibreSSL library which acts as a drop-in replacement for the OpenSSL security library. Further, Void has an init implementation called runit which is unusually small and simple. Another interesting feature of Void is the distribution can use one of two C libraries. Most Linux distributions use the glibc library. Void does provide glibc and also offers installation media with the lightweight musl library. I decided to download the Void project's MATE edition which is 637MB in size. Booting from the supplied media brings up a screen where we can choose between starting the distribution's live environment or loading Void into RAM and then launching the desktop environment. The latter option uses more memory, but makes the distribution run faster and frees up the drive or port where our installation media is located. Read more

FreeFileSync The Best Backup And File Synchronization Tool For All Platforms

​We all have our precious data stored on our PC that we love very much, such as pics, office documents, important files and other stuff. We all try to make a backup of this in mostly one of our external hard disks as the Internet isn’t that fast all the time. Read
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