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Ubuntu: NGINX on Ubuntu Server 18.04, Pick, Departure From i386 and Pop!_OS 19.04 Overview

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Ubuntu
  • How to install the latest version of NGINX on Ubuntu Server 18.04

    NGINX is one of the most popular web servers on the planet. It's reliable, scalable, and easy to use. But did you know, if you install NGINX from the default Ubuntu Server 18.04 repositories, the version you get is out of date? You don't want that. In fact, you probably want the most up-to-date stable release of the software.

  • Pick – A Color Picker for Ubuntu with History Support

    For Ubuntu 18.04 and higher, you can easily install the tool from Ubuntu Software as it has been made as snap package.

  • Ubuntu Confirms It’s Dropping All 32-bit Support Going Forward

    Ubuntu has confirmed plans to drop all support for 32-bit (i386) systems going forward, beginning with the upcoming Ubuntu 19.10 release.

    The decision will mean that the distro no longer builds, packages or distributes any 32-bit software, libraries or tools on newer versions of Ubuntu.

    Users of Ubuntu 18.04 LTS 32-bit are not affected by today’s announcement and will (should?) continue to work as normal, with access to the existing 32-bit archive.

    But the move will mean they are unable to upgrade to a newer Ubuntu release — nope, not even the next LTS!

    Will such a major sounding change have much of an impact?

    Eh, no, not really.

    Ubuntu says it’s stranding a mere 1% of its current user base on 32-bit version Ubuntu 18.04 LTS (which isn’t terrible place to stay, as it is supported until 2023).

  • i386 architecture will be dropped starting with eoan (Ubuntu 19.10)
    Last year, the Ubuntu developer community considered the question of whether
    to continue carrying forward the i386 architecture in the Ubuntu archive for
    future releases.[1]  The discussion at the time was inconclusive, but in
    light of the strong possibility that we might not include i386 as a release
    architecture in 20.04 LTS, we took the proactive step to disable upgrades
    from 18.04 to 18.10 for i386 systems[2], to avoid accidentally stranding
    users on an interim release with 9 months of support instead of letting them
    continue to run Ubuntu 18.04 LTS with its 5 years of standard support.
    
    
    
    
    In February of this year, I also posted to communicate the timeline in which
    we would take a final decision about i386 support in 20.04 LTS[3], namely,
    that we would decide in the middle of 2019.
    
    
    
    
    The middle of 2019 has now arrived.   The Ubuntu engineering team has
    reviewed the facts before us and concluded that we should not continue to
    carry i386 forward as an architecture.   Consequently, i386 will not be
    included as an architecture for the 19.10 release, and we will shortly begin
    the process of disabling it for the eoan series across Ubuntu
    infrastructure.
    
    
    
    
    While this means we will not provide 32-bit builds of new upstream versions
    of libraries, there are a number of ways that 32-bit applications can
    continue to be made available to users of later Ubuntu releases, as detailed
    in [4].   We will be working to polish the 32-bit support story over the
    course of the 19.10 development cycle.  To follow the evolution of this
    support, you can participate in the discourse thread at [5].
  • Ubuntu 19.10 To Drop 32-bit x86 Packages

    Ubuntu and their downstream flavors all stopped shipping x86 32-bit images and now for the 19.10 cycle they have decided to stop their i386 support entirely. Beginning with Ubuntu 19.10, the archive/packages will not be built for x86 32-bit. 

    Longtime Ubuntu developer Steve Langasek announced their decision today that the i386 architecture will be dropped starting with Ubuntu 19.10, affecting all Ubuntu-based platforms / those relying upon the official Ubuntu Eoan archives. 

  • Pop!_OS 19.04 overview | Unleash your potential

    In this video, I am going to show an overview of Pop!_OS 19.04 and some of the applications pre-installed.

Your first robotic arm with Ubuntu Core, coming from Niryo

Filed under
Hardware
Ubuntu

Niryo has built a fantastic 6-axis robotic arm called ‘Niryo One’. It is a 3D-printed, affordable robotic arm focused mainly on educational purposes. Additionally, it is fully open source and based on ROS. On the hardware side, it is powered by a Raspberry Pi 3 and NiryoStepper motors, based on Arduino microcontrollers. When we found out all this, guess what we thought? This is a perfect target for Ubuntu Core and snaps!

When the robotic arm came to my hands, the first thing I did was play with Niryo Studio; a tool from Niryo that lets you move the robotic arm, teach sequences to it and store them, and many more things. You can programme the robotic arm with Python or with a graphical editor based on Google’s Blocky. Niryo Studio is a great tool that makes starting on robotics easy and pleasant.

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Zorin OS 15, An Overview for First Time Users

Filed under
GNU
Linux
Ubuntu

This is my first review for Zorin GNU/Linux operating system ever and this is version 15 released at 5 June 2019. Zorin OS is an Ubuntu-based distro with modified GNOME 3 user interface available in 4 different editions: Ultimate, Core, Lite, and Education. This short overview focuses on the Core Edition: it features very friendly and fast desktop, familiar taskbar, complete desktop applications including LibreOffice and GIMP, and Flatpak and Snap supports built-in. It maintains own repositories and PPAs. Zorin OS is suitable to everybody begins trying GNU/Linux. I hope this short article helps everybody to begin Zorin OS.

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DJI spices up Matrice drones with 2nd Gen Manifold computer running Ubuntu with snaps

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Ubuntu

Canonical announced Ubuntu snaps support for DJI’s second-gen Manifold companion computer for its Matrice drones. The Manifold 2 offers a choice of Jetson TX2 or Intel Coffee Lake-U chips.

DJI’s industry leading drones such as its Phantom and Matrice models are directed by flight controllers that run a proprietary operating system. Yet, in 2015, the company announced a Manifold development computer for its Matrice 100 drone that runs Ubuntu on an Nvidia Tegra K1. A few weeks ago, DJI unveiled a more powerful Manifold 2 computer with a choice of Nvidia Jetson TX2 and Intel Core i7-8550U processors (see farther below). Canonical has followed up by announcing that not only will Ubuntu 16.04 return as the pre-installed OS for the device, but that it will include support for Ubuntu snaps application packages.

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Developers Devising Plan To Ship Newer NVIDIA Drivers On Ubuntu Stable Releases

Filed under
Graphics/Benchmarks
Linux
Ubuntu

Currently NVIDIA's packaged drivers on Ubuntu can get a bit stale on Ubuntu stable releases since they aren't updated in-step with the latest driver releases. But a new stable release update (SRU) policy/exception similar to the Firefox approach is being made for Ubuntu so that new releases will end up working their way into currently supported Ubuntu series.

The Canonical developers working on Ubuntu are really ramping up their support for NVIDIA's proprietary driver. On top of Ubuntu 19.10 to bundle the NVIDIA binary driver into the operating system's ISO image, they are working out the SRU details for shipping newer NVIDIA driver releases on existing Ubuntu stable releases.

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Regolith Linux is the i3 Ubuntu Spin You’ve Been Waiting For

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Ubuntu

Okay, okay. If you are sat there mouthing “what is i3?” at me with a confused, borderline-desperate look on your face, I’ll fill you in:

i3 is a tiling window manager created for X11 (the display manager most Linux distros use, including Ubuntu). i3 supports traditional horizontal vertical window tiling — think window snapping, but arranged and resized automatically — as well as stacking and tabbing.

The differences don’t end there, though.

Like me, you’re probably used to managing app windows with a mouse, but the i3 window manager is largely keyboard driven. The idea is that you use keyboard shortcuts to move, manage and arrange open apps and windows (though you can use a mouse too).

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Give Ubuntu a Bold New Look with the Qogir Theme

Filed under
GNOME
Ubuntu

The background imagery in the Nautilus file manager (the effect also apparently works with Nemo, but I haven’t tested it) is the most visually striking element in the Qogir theme.

It’s a love it/hate it gimmick, which explains why it’s rarely used. Personally I enjoy the visual flourish it adds (though it certainly helps if your desktop wallpaper compliments it).

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Ubuntu: LXD, New Stuff and Snaps

Filed under
Ubuntu
  • Development in LXD

    Most of my development is done in LXD containers. I love this for a few reasons. It takes all of my development dependencies and makes it so that they're not installed on my host system, reducing the attack surface there. It means that I can do development on any Linux that I want (or several). But it also means that I can migrate my development environment from my laptop to my desktop depending on whether I need more CPU or whether I want it to be closer to where I'm working (usually when travelling).

    When I'm traveling I use my Pagekite SSH setup on a Raspberry Pi as the SSH gateway. So when I'm at home I want to connect to the desktop directly, but when away connect through the gateway.

  • Snap Store Is Available for Ubuntu!, How to Install It?

    Snap is a software used to install software packages that can run on various Linux distributions. This time Snap Store can be installed and used like using the Software Center (on Ubuntu), or GNOME Software. This application was created specifically to make it easier for users when installing software packages on Snap.

    Actually, the Ubuntu Software Center and GNOME software can add the url of a software package and install it. But both of these applications will mix search results that are snap, flatpak and others.

  • Use Font Finder to Install Google Fonts on Ubuntu

    If you are in search of finding and using some pretty fonts for your Ubuntu desktop, applications, and web pages, Font Finder is there for your help.

  • An OpenJPEG Surprise

    My previous blog post seems to have resolved most concerns about my requests for Ubuntu stable release updates, but I again received rather a lot of criticism for the choice to make WebKit depend on OpenJPEG, even though my previous post explained clearly why there are are not any good alternatives.

    I was surprised to receive a pointer to ffmpeg, which has its own JPEG 2000 decoder that I did not know about. However, we can immediately dismiss this option due to legal problems with depending on ffmpeg. I also received a pointer to a resurrected libjasper, which is interesting, but since libjasper was removed from Ubuntu, its status is not currently better than OpenJPEG.

    But there is some good news! I have looked through Ubuntu’s security review of the OpenJPEG code and found some surprising results. Half the reported issues affect the library’s companion tools, not the library itself. And the other half of the issues affect the libmj2 library, a component of OpenJPEG that is not built by Ubuntu and not used by WebKit. So while these are real security issues that raise concerns about the quality of the OpenJPEG codebase, none of them actually affect OpenJPEG as used by WebKit. Yay!

  • Call for testing: chromium-browser deb to snap transition

    The chromium browser has been available as a deb package for all supported Ubuntu releases and as a snap since version 60, and the time has come to start transitioning away from the debs.

  • Canonical Announces Embedded Computer Manifold 2 for Drone Developers, Request For Help Testing Snap Package, PHP v7.4.0 Available, PyCharm 2019.2 EAP3 Released, Talks To Port Over Microsoft's Chromium-Based Edge browser To Linux

    Yesterday, Canonical, the company behind Ubuntu announced the availability of Manifold 2, a high-performance embedded computer offered by leading enterprise drone manufacturer, DJI. This availability will allow developers access to containerized software packages (e.g. Snaps), allowing for infinite evolution and functionality changes.

    It looks as if Ubuntu is transitioning the Chromium Debian package to a Snap one. The community behind this effort is asking for assistance in testing the Snap package.

Canonical's Linux Snap Store Adds 10 Distro-Specific Installation Pages For Every App

Filed under
Linux
Ubuntu

Canonical's Snap Store -- a fairly distro-agnostic solution for easily installing a wide variety of apps -- is loaded up and ready to go in Linux distributions like Zorin OS and Ubuntu. It's also supported on dozens of others including Arch, Linux Mint, Manjaro and elementary OS, provided you install the Snapd service first. Now it looks like Canonical is striving to make the entire experience more user-friendly by serving up distro-specific landing pages for every single app in the Snap Store.

They look pretty slick, too.

For example, if you want to install something like Telegram, the Snap Store is ready to serve up a unique page, complete with an appropriately colored and logo-laden background explaining how to install both the required Snapd service and the app for the distro you're using. In the screenshot below, you'll notice commands to pull Snapd from the AUR (Arch User Repository), enable the service and then install Telegram Desktop.

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12 Best Web Browsers for Ubuntu

Filed under
Web
Ubuntu

Selecting the best web browsers for Ubuntu largely depends on your personal needs, but usually, browsers are used for accessing/browsing websites.

In this article, we will look under the hood and highlight some of the best web browsers for Ubuntu.

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rga: Search Text In PDF, Ebooks, Office Documents, Archives And More (ripgrep Wrapper)

rga (or ripgrep-all) is a command line tool to recursively search all files in a directory for a regex pattern, that runs on Linux, macOS and Windows. It's a wrapper for ripgrep, the line-oriented recursive search program, on top of which it enables search in a multitude of file types like PDF, DOCX, ODT, EPUB, SQLite databases, movies subtitles embedded in MKV or MP4 files, archives like ZIP or GZ, and more. rga is great when you want to search for some text from a file available in a folder with many documents of various file types, even if some of them are available in archives. Read more

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9 Best Free Linux Biology Tools

Biology is a natural science concerned with the study of living things, ranging from microscopic organisms up to the largest known animal, the blue whale. It is divided into many specialized fields including evolution, ecology, zoology, botany, genetics, microbiology and molecular biology. This science examines function, structure, origin, growth, evolution, distribution and taxonomy. Biology is extremely relevant to our daily lives, as it helps us to understand how living things work, including the human body. Furthermore, the study of biology is crucial in the development of new food products, to protect the environmental quality of our world, and improving human health e.g. through the discovery of new medical treatments and tests for diseases. Modern biology is founded on four main components: cell theory, evolution, gene theory, and homeostasis. Schools recognize the importance of biology to society, regarding it as one of the three most important branches of sciences, alongside physics and chemistry. We covered the best open source Linux software available for these disciplines in the following articles: Physics, Chemistry. Biology is at the cutting edge of scientific research and development. In the past 40 years, biology has advanced enormously revealing a wealth of information about the millions of different organisms inhabiting our planet, including, of course, ourselves. Biology continues to grab the headlines with much excitement being generated in the fields of synthetic biology (combining science and engineering) and genomics (the study of the genomes of organisms). A good range of open source biology software is available for Linux. This article focuses on selecting our favorite tools which are extremely useful for biologists. We hope this feature offers a useful resource for biologists and students alike. With the diverse range of software, there should be something of interest here for all budding biologists. Here’s our legendary rating chart showing our top recommendations. Read more Also: Vorta BorgBackup GUI Now Available For Install On Linux From Flathub