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Configuring Automatic Login and Lock Screen on Ubuntu 19.10

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Ubuntu
HowTos

Whether it’s Linux or Windows, Ubuntu, or Fedora, I am not an ‘automatic’ type of guy. That is to say, and I don’t want my login automated, nor do I want my updates automatically installed. This preference directly results from over thirty years in Information Technology, prudence, habit, and experience. Plus, it’s just plain smart security sense.

However, I further realize that as Linux users get younger and younger, I am increasingly in the minority in this sense. While I strongly disagree with automatic logins and updates, I can understand the desire for it.

So, with that understanding, let’s go about the business of instituting automated logins in Ubuntu. We will also take the time to address the Ubuntu Lock Screen setting. Configuring automatic Ubuntu software updates is much more in-depth. We will discuss this in a separate dedicated article at a later date.

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Canonical/Ubuntu: Design and Web Team, Ubuntu ZFS Support, Weekly Newsletter

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Ubuntu
  • Design and Web team summary – 11 October 2019

    This was a fairly busy two weeks for the Web & design team at Canonical. This cycle we had two sprints. The first was a web performance workshop run by the amazing Harry Roberts. It was a whirlwind two days where we learned a lot about networking, browsers, font loading and more. We also spent a day working on implementing a lot of the changes. Hopefully our sites will feel a bit faster. More updates will be coming over the next few months. The second sprint was for the Brand and Web team, where we looked at where the Canonical and Ubuntu brands need to evolve. Here are some of the highlights of our completed work.

  • Ubuntu ZFS support in 19.10: ZFS on root

    This is part 2 of our blog post series on our current and future work around ZFS on root support in ubuntu. If you didn’t yet read the introductory post, I strongly recommend you to do this first!

    Here we are going to discuss what landed by default ubuntu 19.10.

  • Ubuntu Weekly Newsletter Issue 600

    Welcome to the Ubuntu Weekly Newsletter, Issue 600 for the week of October 6 – 12, 2019.

Ubuntu 19.10 (Eoan Ermine) Enters Final Freeze Ahead of October 17th Release

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Ubuntu

As of October 10th, the Ubuntu 19.10 release is officially in Final Freeze, the last step of its development stage, which means that only release critical bugs affecting the ISO images or the installers will be accepted in the archives. Release Candidate images are also now available for testing to ensure an uneventful and smooth release.

"We will shut down cronjobs and spin some RC images late Friday or early Saturday once the archive and proposed-migration have settled a bit, and we expect everyone with a vested interest in a flavour (or two) and a few spare hours here and there to get to testing to make sure we have another uneventful release next week," said Adam Conrad.

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Debian and Ubuntu Patch Critical Sudo Security Vulnerability, Update Now

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Security
Debian
Ubuntu

Discovered by Joe Vennix, the security vulnerability (CVE-2019-14287) could be exploited by an attacker to execute arbitrary commands as the root user (system administrator) because sudo incorrectly handled certain user IDs when it was configured to allow users to run commands as an arbitrary user through the ALL keyword in a Runas specification.

"Joe Vennix discovered that sudo, a program designed to provide limited super user privileges to specific users, when configured to allow a user to run commands as an arbitrary user via the ALL keyword in a Runas specification, allows to run commands as root by specifying the user ID- -1 or 4294967295," reads Debian's security advisory.

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Debian and Ubuntu Leftovers

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Debian
Ubuntu
  • Ritesh Raj Sarraf: Bpfcc New Release

    bpfcc version 0.11.0 has been uploaded to Debian Unstable and should be accessible in the repositories by now. After the 0.8.0 release, this has been the next one uploaded to Debian.

  • Utkarsh Gupta: Joining Debian LTS!

    Back during the good days of DebConf19, I finally got a chance to meet Holger! As amazing and inspiring a person he is, it was an absolute pleasure meeting him and also, I got a chance to talk about Debian LTS in more detail.

    [...]

    I had almost no idea what to do next, so the next month I stayed silent, observing the workflow as people kept committing and announcing updates.
    And finally in September, I started triaging and fixing the CVEs for Jessie and Stretch (mostly the former).
    Thanks to Abhijith who explained the basics of what DLA is and how do we go about fixing bugs and then announcing them.
    With that, I could fix a couple of CVEs and thanks to Holger (again) for reviewing and sponsoring the uploads! Big Grin

  • Ubucon Europe 2019 in local media

    News from the new Ubuntu distribution, the exploration of the several platforms and many “how to”, rule the 4-days agenda where the open source and open technologies are in the air.

    The Olga Cadaval Cultural centre in Sintra, is the main stage of a busy agenda filled with several talks and more technical sessions, but at Ubucon Europe there’s also room for networking and cultural visits, a curious fusion between spaces full of history, like the Pena Palace or the Quinta da Regaleira, and one of the youngest “players” in the world of software.

    For 4 days, the international Ubuntu Community gathers in Sintra for an event open to everyone, where the open source principles and open technology are dominating. The Ubucon Europe Conference begun Thursday, October 10th, and extends until Sunday, October 13th, keeping an open doors policy to everyone who wants to

    Afterall, what is the importance of Ubucon? The number of participants, which should be around 150, doesn’t tell the whole story of what you can learn during these days, as the SAPO TEK had the opportunity to check this morning.

    Organised by the Ubuntu Portugal Community, with the National Association for Open Software, the Ubuntu Europe Federation and the Sintra Municipality, the conference brings to Portugal some of the biggest open source specialists and shows that Ubuntu is indeed alive, even if not yet known by most people, and still far from the “world domain” aspired by some.

Canonical/Ubuntu: MaaS and Travis CI

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Ubuntu

Ubuntu 19.10 Provides Good Out-Of-The-Box Support For The Dell XPS 7390 Icelake Laptop

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Reviews
Ubuntu

For those not following on Twitter, recently I picked up one of the new Dell XPS 7390 laptops for finally being able to deliver Linux benchmarks from Intel Ice Lake! Yes, it's real and running under Linux! For those eyeing the Dell XPS 7390 with this being the first prominent laptop with Ice Lake, here is a brief look at the initial experience with using Ubuntu 19.10.

The Dell XPS 7390 laptop that's being used for testing features the Intel Core i7 1065G7 processor, an Icelake quad-core processor with 1.3GHz base frequency and 3.9GHz peak turbo frequency. This Ice Lake processor features Gen11 Iris Plus Graphics, which we are eagerly testing with the latest Linux graphics drivers.

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Overview to Ubuntu 19.10 Eoan Ermine

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Ubuntu

We are excited to welcome the latest Ubuntu called Eoan Ermine that planned to be released this month at Thursday, 17 October 2019. This short overview shows several new things I found in this Ubuntu 19.04 development edition (as per 12 October 2019, frozen status, before official release). Thanks to the daily ISO, we know that Ubuntu Eoan has new features such as grouping apps on start menu, new icons for apps and disks, and latest version of GNOME 3.34 and LibreOffice 6.3. I once again divided the article into only 3 parts so you could enjoy this review easily. Okay, let's go!

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8 Ways Ubuntu Has Changed and Improved Linux

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GNU
Linux
Ubuntu

Ubuntu is the world’s most prominent Linux distribution. Ubuntu and its developer, Canonical, has caught a lot of flack over the years, but the Linux world is much better off thanks to both.

So let’s stop and take a moment to appreciate some of what Canonical and Ubuntu have given the Linux community.

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A detailed look at Ubuntu’s new experimental ZFS installer

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Reviews
Ubuntu

Although there isn't any support built into Eoan's apt package manager for automatically taking snapshots yet, we can demonstrate a snapshot—oops—rollback moment manually. In the above gallery, first we take a ZFS snapshot. Eoan has split our root filesystem into tons of little datasets (more on that later), so we use the -r option for zfs snapshot to recursively take snapshots throughout the entire tree.

Now that we've insured ourselves against mistakes, we do something we're going to regret. For the purposes of this demo, we're just removing Firefox—but we could really recover from anything up to and including an rm -rf --no-preserve-root / this way with a little extra legwork. After removing Firefox, we need to roll back our snapshots to restore the system to its original condition.

Since the root filesystem is scattered through a bunch of individual datasets, we need to roll them all back individually. Although this is a pain for the casual user without additional tooling, it does make it possible to do more granular restore operations if we're feeling picky—like rolling back the root filesystem without rolling back /home. Ubuntu will undoubtedly eventually have tooling to make this easier, but for the moment, we do a bit of sysadmin-fu and pipe zfs list to grep to awk to xargs, oh my.

The command line acrobatics might have been obnoxious, but the rollback itself was instantaneous, and Firefox has returned. It still doesn't work quite right, though, due to orphaned filehandles—we rolled back a live mounted root filesystem, which is kind of a cowboy thing to do. To make things entirely right, a reboot is necessary—but after the reboot, everything's the way it once was, and without the need to wait through any lengthy Windows Restore Point-style groveling over the filesystem.

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Security Leftovers

  • Security updates for Wednesday

    Security updates have been issued by Debian (apache2 and unbound), Fedora (opendmarc, runc, and sudo), openSUSE (epiphany, GraphicsMagick, and libopenmpt), Oracle (kernel and sudo), Red Hat (java-1.8.0-openjdk, jss, kernel, kernel-rt, and kpatch-patch), SUSE (crowbar-core, crowbar-openstack, grafana, novnc, openstack-keystone, openstack-neutron, openstack-neutron-lbaas, openstack-nova, openstack-tempest, python-pysaml2, python-urllib3, rubygem-chef, rubygem-easy_diff, sleshammer, libpcap, sudo, and tcpdump), and Ubuntu (aspell and libsdl1.2).

  • Cybersecurity Awareness Month: Increasing our self-awareness so we can improve security

    October has been National Cybersecurity Awareness Month since 2004. According to staysafeonline.org, this initiative was started by the National Cybersecurity Alliance and the US Department of Homeland Security to help all Americans stay safe and secure when online. This month is usually marked with a significant uptick in cybersecurity outreach and training. It’s also the one month of the year when you can get a significant amount of cybersecurity swag such as webcam covers, mugs, and pens. This event has an outward focus to raise awareness of security globally, Many other events have come into existence along with this. For example, there are numerous electronics recycling events that now occur in October where people can securely dispose of their old computers. Some municipalities have extended this to include safe disposal of old prescription medications, paints, and other hazardous materials. Recent events in the greater technology community, specifically the resignation of Richard Stallman from both MIT and the Free Software Foundation, have become character foils that show us that while we have come a long way, we still have a long way ahead of us to improve.

  • Michael Tremer/IPFire: On quadrupling throughput of our Quality of Service

    There have been improvements to our Quality of Service (or QoS) which have made me very excited. Our QoS sometimes was a bottleneck. Enabling it could cut your bandwidth in half if you were unlucky. That normally was not a problem for larger users of IPFire, because if you are running a 1 Gigabit/s connection, you would not need any QoS in the first place, or your hardware was fast enough to handle the extra load. For the smaller users this was, however, becoming more and more of a problem. Smaller systems like the IPFire Mini Appliance are designed to be small (the clue is in the name) and to be very energy-efficient. And they are. They are popular with users with a standard DSL connection of up to 100 Megabit/s which is very common in Germany. You have nothing to worry about here. But if you are lucky to have a faster Internet connection, then this hardware and others that we have sold before might be running out of steam. There is only so much you can get out of them.

  • The City Of Baltimore Blew Off A $76,000 Ransomware Demand Only To Find Out A Bunch Of Its Data Had Never Been Backed Up [Ed: Windows]

    The City of Baltimore was hit with a ransomware attack in May of this year. Criminals using remodeled and rebranded NSA exploits (EternalBlue) knocked out a "majority" of the city's servers and crippled many of its applications. More details didn't surface until September when the city's government began reshuffling the budget to cover the expenses of recovering from the attack.

Games: AI War 2, Dominus Galaxia, Sipho, Lonely Mountains: Downhill and More

  • AI War 2, the massive RTS game confirmed for launch on October 22

    Arcen Games have now fully confirmed that October 22 is the final launch date for AI War 2 to leave Early Access. This is the sequel to the critically acclaimed AI War: Fleet Command released back in 2009, which eventually came to Linux too later in 2014. The release of AI War 2 is going to mark 10 years since the original! Funded on Kickstarter back in 2016 with the help of around 2,545 backers. AI War 2 is a grand strategy RTS hybrid against an overwhelming, inhuman enemy who has conquered the galaxy. The enemy has made only a single error: underestimating you. You must steal as much technology as you can, take enough territory to fortify your bases and launch your last stand.

  • Dominus Galaxia, a 4x strategy game heavily inspired by Master of Orion 1 has a Linux demo up

    Their aim with Dominus Galaxia is to be an upgraded spiritual successor to the original Master of Orion, they said to think of it like if Master of Orion 2 was a proper sequel and not a "a radical re-imagining". It's currently crowdfunding on Kickstarter which has 10 days to go with nearly 50% of the funding needed, with a bit of a stretch it may be able to make it. Just recently, they put up a full demo of the game with Linux support on itch.io.

  • Creature building action and survival game 'Sipho' adds some fun new zooids for your monstrosity

    Swim, kill, adapt and hopefully survive. That's the aim of the game in Sipho and the recent update adds in some new pieces for you to unlock to build your horrific sea creature with. It's such a strange game, blending together furious action with a creature builder where you unlock different parts and species. Based on real science, inspired by the Siphonophorae with your creature being built with zooids, an animal that forms part of a colony that all move together.

  • No Linux version of Lonely Mountains: Downhill yet due to IL2CPP in Unity

    Megagon Industries have now confirmed the status of Lonely Mountains: Downhill for Linux and currently it's not good news. This is a game that was funded on Kickstarter, that had Linux as a platform for release. If this sounds familiar, it's because we wrote about this game recently where the developer seemed a bit confused on the Linux version and they weren't clear on what they were doing.

  • Project RIP, a new FPS released recently with Linux support and it looks action-packed

    Fight off waves of demons in Project RIP from developer Storming Tech, a new Unreal Engine first-person shooter that has Linux support. This is the same developer who also made Escape Legacy: Ancient Scrolls, an escape room puzzle game which also seemed quite good.

  • The Northgard free Conquest expansion is launching October 22

    The huge free Conquest expansion for the strategy game Northgard is now confirmed to be releasing on October 22. As announced before this free update is going to include a new standalone game mode, which can be played solo or in co-op. Offering up a series of missions, offering a what they claim is "100+" hours of extra possible play time. The missions don't seem to be linked, offering up something new each time with specific victory conditions and rule sets.

  • The impressively smooth roguelike Jupiter Hell has a big AI upgrade and a first sale

    ChaosForge continue advancing their turn-based shooter roguelike shooter Jupiter Hell, with another big update now available. A big focus has been on the AI to actually make it a bit smarter. Humanoid enemies will now attempt to take cover and not always run in a straight line at you, which can make it a little more difficult for sure. Most enemies will also react to noise you and other NPCs make. The demon-like enemies will now track you by smell, so you can't hide from them. You might find the need to retreat more often, to find a better position.

Red Hat and Fedora: syslog-ng, Ansible, Libinput and Fedora Community

  • syslog-ng in two words at One Identity UNITE: reduce and simplify

    UNITE is the partner and user conference of One Identity, the company behind syslog-ng. This time the conference took place in Phoenix, Arizona where I talked to a number of American business customers and partners about syslog-ng. They were really enthusiastic about syslog-ng and emphasized two major reasons why they use syslog-ng or plan to introduce it to their infrastructure: syslog-ng allows them to reduce the log data volume and greatly simplify their infrastructure by introducing a separate log management layer. [...] When you collect log messages to a central location using syslog-ng, you can archive all of the messages there. If you add a new log analysis application to your infrastructure, you can just point syslog-ng at it and forward the necessary subset of log data there. Life at both security and operations in your environment becomes easier, as there is only a single software to check for security problems and distribute on your systems instead of many.

  • Ansible vs Terraform vs Juju: Fight or cooperation?

    Ansible vs Terraform vs Juju vs Chef vs SaltStack vs Puppet vs CloudFormation – there are so many tools available out there. What are these tools? Do I need all of them? Are they fighting with each other or cooperating? The answer is not really straightforward. It usually depends on your needs and the particular use case. While some of these tools (Ansible, Chef, StaltStack, Puppet) are pure configuration management solutions, the others (Juju, Terraform, CloudFormation) focus more on services orchestration. For the purpose of this blog, we’re going to focus on Ansible vs Terraform vs Juju comparison – the three major players which have dominated the market. [...] Contrary to both Ansible and Terraform, Juju is an application modelling tool, developed and maintained by Canonical. You can use it to model and automate deployments of even very complex environments consisting of various interconnected applications. Examples of such environments include OpenStack, Kubernetes or Ceph clusters. Apart from the initial deployment, you can also use Juju to orchestrate deployed services too. Thanks to Juju you can backup, upgrade or scale-out your applications as easily as executing a single command. Like Terraform, Juju uses a declarative approach, but it brings it beyond the providers up to the applications layer. You can not only declare a number of machines to be deployed or number of application units, but also configuration options for deployed applications, relations between them, etc. Juju takes care of the rest of the job. This allows you to focus on shaping your application instead of struggling with the exact routines and recipes for deploying them. Forget the “How?” and focus on the “What?”.

  • libinput's bus factor is 1

    Let's arbitrarily pick the 1.9.0 release (roughly 2 years ago) and look at the numbers: of the ~1200 commits since 1.9.0, just under 990 were done by me. In those 2 years we had 76 contributors in total, but only 24 of which have more than one commit and only 6 contributors have more than 5 commits. The numbers don't really change much even if we go all the way back to 1.0.0 in 2015. These numbers do not include the non-development work: release maintenance for new releases and point releases, reviewing CI failures [1], writing documentation (including the stuff on this blog), testing and bug triage. Right now, this is effectively all done by one person. This is... less than ideal. At this point libinput is more-or-less the only input stack we have [2] and all major distributions rely on it. It drives mice, touchpads, tablets, keyboards, touchscreens, trackballs, etc. so basically everything except joysticks.

  • Contribute to Fedora Magazine

    Do you love Linux and open source? Do you have ideas to share, enjoy writing, or want to help run a blog with over 60k visits every week? Then you’re at the right place! Fedora Magazine is looking for contributors. This article walks you through various options of contributing and guides you through the process of becoming a contributor.

  • Fabiano Fidêncio: Libosinfo (Part I)

    Libosinfo is the operating system information database. As a project, it consists of three different parts, with the goal to provide a single place containing all the required information about an operating system in order to provision and manage it in a virtualized environment.

  • Τι κάνεις FOSSCOMM 2019

    When the students visited our Fedora booth, they were excited to take some Fedora gifts, especially the tattoo sticker. I was asking how many of them used Fedora, and most of them were using Ubuntu, Linux Mint, Kali Linux and Elementary OS. It was an opportunity to share the Fedora 30 edition and give the beginner’s guide that the Fedora community wrote in a little book. Most of them enjoyed taking photos with the Linux frame I did in Edinburgh... [...] I was planning to teach the use of the GTK library with C, Python, and Vala. However, because of the time and the preference of the attendees, we only worked with C. The workshop was supported by Alex Angelo who also traduced some of my expressions in Greek. I was flexible in using different Operating Systems such as Linux Mint, Ubuntu, Kubuntu among other distros. There were only two users that used Fedora. Almost half of the audience did not bring a laptop, and then I grouped in groups to work together. I enjoyed to see young students eager to learn, they took their own notes, and asked questions. You might see the video of the workshop that was recorded by the organizers.

  • Extending the Minimization objective

    Earlier this summer, the Fedora Council approved the first phase of the Minimization objective. Minimization looks at package dependencies and tries to minimize the footprint for a variety of use cases. The first phase resulted in the development of a feedback pipeline, a better understanding of the problem space, and some initial ideas for policy improvements.

today's howtos and programming leftovers