Language Selection

English French German Italian Portuguese Spanish

Google

Teachers explain why they’re ditching iPads for ‘much more useful’ Chromebooks

Filed under
GNU
Linux
Google
Mac

As popular as the iPad has been for end consumers, schools have also been a major part of the tablet’s success. Ever since Apple launched the iPad in 2010, schools all over the country have experimented with placing them in classrooms or giving them to students to bring home with them. The Atlantic reports that although many institutions were initially satisfied with the results, many are now beginning to see the potential upshot of affordable laptops over expensive tablets.

Read more

Chromebook sales to nearly triple by 2017

Filed under
GNU
Linux
Google

Google's Chromebook might not be setting the consumer world on fire yet but its stocks are set to rise, with new research predicting sales of Chromebooks will reach 5.2 million units in 2014, a 79% increase from 2013,

By 2017, sales of Chromebooks are set to nearly triple to reach 14.4 million units, with the main driver being the US education market, which currently accounts for nearly 85% of all sales.

Read more

Soon you will be able to assemble your phones like PCs, courtesy Google’s Ara

Filed under
Android
Google
Gadgets

Recently we have seen a number of ‘game changer’ moves by smartphone companies all looking to start the new trend. The most recent was the launch of the OnePlus One as the “Flagship Killer” which attempted to offer high spec smartphones at a rock-bottom price. In reality the price was simply half the price you would expect to pay for a Samsung Galaxy S5 or LG G3. So although this did change what users (and probably manufacturers) expect a top of the range smartphone to cost it did not really set the smart world alight.

Read more

Free Android Apps August 2014: New Top Free Play Store Apps

Filed under
Android
Google

The Android OS and phone experience wouldn't be complete without the apps at the Google Play Store. Then there are two classifications of apps, those that you need to pay for, and those that are free to download. Free apps are more popular for obvious reasons.

It's important to take note however, that not all free apps are good apps. For those who like to download apps, it is important to have a keen eye for apps that are actually good.

Read more

Acer's new Chromebook 13 offers a high-resolution screen and all-day battery life

Filed under
GNU
Linux
Google

Nvidia is touting the graphical performance of its K1 processor, which outperforms the Intel and Samsung-equipped Chromebooks in Nvidia's multitasking and benchmark tests. The company points to the quad-core processor design (most Chromebooks have only dual-core processors) and more powerful graphics processing unit as differentiators in the Chromebook world. Demos of the 3D rendering capabilities were impressive in person, and Nvidia's multitasking demo (which comprised of four open windows, streaming music, and running a script in a Google Sheet) did show the Chromebook 13 to be faster than an Intel-equipped model. Despite these impressive performance feats, Nvidia is confident that the Chromebook 13 will last longer away from a wall outlet than any other Chromebook on the market. It is also Google Hangouts Optimized, which allows for high definition Hangouts and multitasking at the same time.

Read more

Six Clicks: The best Chromebooks for school

Filed under
GNU
Linux
Google

Chromebooks have proven to be wildly popular in schools. More than a million Chromebooks were sold to schools this spring alone.

For schools, Chromebook math is easy. In Google's Chromebooks for Education program, each device can cost as little as $279 and they're easy to manage from a centralized console. For school districts the real killer feature is this: If they buy through the Google program and a Chromebook stops working, Google just replaces it for no additional cost.

Read more

HP Slatebook price higher than expected

Filed under
Android
Google

Most price speculation put the device at around $399, and considered the device expensive. Now that the official price is known, the unique device seems even less appealing than before. With HP’s Chromebooks ranging from $279 to $349, and LTE models available, the Slatebook looks woefully overpriced.

Read more

Google Confirms That Chromebooks Are Selling Well in Schools

Filed under
Google

While market predictions for PCs have been generally bleak, Chromebooks--portable computers based on Google's Chrome OS platform--have been doing well in sales terms. That's especially true in schools, where many districts are purchasing the low cost systems that run cloud applications for students to use.

Read more

GSoC: Open Source Event Manager Organizer Dashboard

Filed under
Development
Google
SUSE

In the past 4 months during this years Google Summer of Code (GSoC), a global program that offers student developers stipends to write code for open source software projects, Christian Bruckmayer collaborated with other students and mentors to code a dashboard for the Open Source Event Manager (OSEM). In this series of three posts Christian will tell you about his project and what he has learned from this experience.

Read more

The great Ars experiment—free and open source software on a smartphone?!

Filed under
Android
Google
OSS

Android is a Google product—it's designed and built from the ground up to integrate with Google services and be a cloud-powered OS. A lot of Android is open source, though, and there's nothing that says you have to use it the way that Google would prefer. With some work, it’s possible to turn a modern Android smartphone into a Google-less, completely open device—so we wanted to try just that. After dusting off the Nexus 4 and grabbing a copy of the open source parts of Android, we jumped off the grid and dumped all the proprietary Google and cloud-based services you'd normally use on Android. Instead, this experiment runs entirely on open source alternatives. FOSS or bust!

Read more

Syndicate content

More in Tux Machines

Tiny quad-core ARM mini-PC runs Ubuntu with Cinnamon

A startup is pitching a $129-$199 “Imp” mini-PC on Indiegogo based on a quad-core Odroid-U3 SBC, with HDMI streaming and an Ubuntu/Cinnamon Linux desktop. A day after reporting on one Israeli-based, non-Android ARM mini-PC — SolidRun’s $100 CuBoxTV with OpenElec Linux — here comes another. Aside from the usual hyperbole found on crowdfunding pages — are we really “democratizing the digital home experience” or just buying an embedded ARM computer? — the Ubuntu-based Imp mini-PC looks like a pretty good deal. Read more

Ready to give Linux a try? These are the 5 distros you need to consider

There are so many Linux distributions that choosing one can be overwhelming for a new user. One might be too intimidating for a user to even try, while another might be too simplified, blocking that user from knowing how Linux systems actually function. I have been using Linux as my primary OS since 2005 and have tried all major (and quite a lot of minor) distributions. I have learned that not every distribution is for everyone. Since I also assist people in migrating to Linux, I have chosen the 5 distros that I recommend to new users based on their level of comfort and desire to learn (or not learn) more about Linux. Read more

Review of the new Firefox browser built for developers

Mozilla recently announced a new browser version for developers on the 10th anniversary of the Firefox browser. The Usersnap team and I took a look at whether it works well for the web development process, offers developers a variety of possible applications, and if it keeps up with the Google Chrome dev tools. Read more

Mapping the world with open source

In the world of geospatial technology, closed source solutions have been the norm for decades. But the tides are slowly turning as open source GIS software is gaining increasing prominence. Paul Ramsey, senior strategist at the open source company Boundless, is one of the people trying to change that. Ramsey has been working with geospatial software for over ten years, as programmer and consultant. He founded the PostGIS spatial database project in 2001, and is currently an active developer and member of the project steering committee. Ramsey serves as an evangelist for OpenGeo Suite, works with the Boundless business development team to share about their collection of offerigns, and speaks and teaches regularly at conferences around the world. Read more