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Chrome Changes

Filed under
Google
Web

Google Chrome Users Will Push Content to Chromecast Without Dedicated Extension

Filed under
Linux
Google

The Chromium developers are working on a solution that allows users to cast media content to the Chromecast without the need to have the Google Cast extension.

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Google Pixel C review: the best Android tablet is a viable iPad competitor

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Android
Google
Reviews

The Pixel C is Google’s first own-brand tablet, designed and made via China by Google and is the best Android tablet available at the moment.

The Pixel C joins the Chromebook Pixel - the first piece of hardware designed solely by Google - but instead of running Chrome OS the Pixel C runs the latest version of Android 6.0 Marshmallow, making it the first tablet to do so.

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Google Pixel C Android Tablet: Australian Review

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Android
Google
Reviews

Android tablets don’t get much love these days. Team them with a good keyboard and they’re useful for basic productivity tasks, as proven by our time with the Samsung Galaxy Tab S2 and Sony Xperia Z4 Tablet. And beyond that they’re still great for playing games, reading books, watching TV shows and listening to music like any other Android device. But hey’re just a little less cool than iPads. And a little less useful than laptops.

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Acer goes gaga for Google's Linux-based OS with Chromebase 24 and Chromebook 11

Filed under
Linux
Google

Welcome to 2016, dear BetaNews readers. Another year is here, and some trends will continue as before. The most intriguing being Google's push into both education and home with its wonderful Chrome OS. While a bit limited, devices with Google's Linux-based desktop operating system are perfection for many; especially as more and more time is spent in the browser.

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Leftovers: Software and Games

Filed under
Google
Software
  • Best Command Line PNG Tools

    Portable Network Graphics (PNG) is a raster graphics file format that supports lossless data compression. This means all image information is restored when the file is decompressed during viewing. The compression engine is based on the Deflate method designed by PKWare and originally used in PKZIP, a file archiving computer program.

  • ircb 0.1 released!

    Please feel free to give ircb a run and share your feedback here. Your suggestions and feedback are extremely valuable to us and will help us in developing this product accordingly.

  • RcppTOML 0.0.5

    After a short hiatus, a new version of the (wonderfully useful, if I dare say so Wink RcppTOML package is now on CRAN. RcppTOML lets R read the (absolutely awesome) TOML configuration file format--which is simply fabulous as it emphasizes strong readability for humans while at the same time supporting strong typing as well as immediate and clear error reports. At work, we're all fans now.

  • Bombernauts, bomberman for mental people now on Linux & SteamOS

    Bombernauts is pretty much bomberman on a year long diet of steroids, as it's insane. We should get a game of this going sometime. This is definitely a contender for the next multiplayer GOL livestream that's for sure. It's in Early Access, so we might leave it to bake in the oven a bit longer, it seems to run quite well though, with no obvious bugs I could find.

  • GOL Cast: Wandering Around Morrowind in OpenMW

    The Elder Scrolls III: Morrowind is an RPG from 2002. You are released from prison and sent to the province of Morrowind by the emperor of Tamriel to complete a task that will take you on a great journey throughout Morrowind.

Will Chromebooks surpass Macs and Windows computers?

Filed under
GNU
Linux
Google

Chromebooks have been big sellers on Amazon for quite some time now, and their popularity among some users is simply undeniable. But will Chromebooks eventually surpass Macs and Windows computers? A writer at the San Francisco Chronicle recently examined that possibility. I’ll share my thoughts below, but here’s a snippet from the SFC article.

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Also (iffy format): Linuxbox Tutorial Linux Bahasa Indonesia

Leftovers: Gaming

Filed under
Google
Gaming

Google debuts designer watch faces for Android Wear

Filed under
Android
Google

With companies like TAG Heuer and Fossil now investing in Android Wear, Google knows how important it is to keep smartwatches looking stylish. As such, the company has revealed a set of fashion-centric watch faces for Android Wear devices, as part of a partnership with nine different brands. This includes designs from Asics, Harajuku Kawaii!, Mango, Melissa Joy Manning, Nicole Miller, Ted Baker, Vivienne Tam, Y-3 and Zoe Jordan.

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Google to train 2M new Android developers in India over next 3 years

Filed under
Android
Google

Google announced Wednesday that it plans to ramp up its engineering presence in India. Part of that push will involve launching a program to train two million new Android developers over the next three years, the company said. To do so, it will partner with more than 30 universities in India.

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More in Tux Machines

Linux and Graphics

  • ContainerCon Vendors Offer Flexible Solutions for Managing All Your New Micro-VMs
    As you might expect, this week's LinuxCon and ContainerCon 2016, held in Toronto, is heavy on the benefits and pitfalls of deploying containers, but several vendors aim to come to the rescue with flexible tools to manage it all. Take Datadog, a New York-based company that offers scalable monitoring of your containerized infrastructure—and just about everything else—from a single interface. This is an off-premise, cloud-based tool that can monitor tens of thousands of your hosts and integrate with stuff you already know, like AWS, Cassandra, Docker, Kubernetes, Postgre and 150 other tools.
  • Happy Birthday Linux
    Linux turns 25 today. That's four years older than Linus was when he invented it. That means Linus has spent more of his life with Linux than he did without it
  • AMDGPU In Linux 4.9 To Bring Virtual Display Support, Improved GPU Reset
    The first pull request has been submitted of new Radeon and AMDGPU DRM driver updates to be queued in DRM-Next for landing with the Linux 4.9 kernel. To look forward to Linux 4.9 even though Linux 4.8 is still weeks from being released is PowerPlay support for Iceland GPUs, improved GPU reset, UVD and VCE power-gating for Carrizo and Stoney, support for pre-initialized vRAM buffers, TTM clean-ups, virtual display support, and other low-level changes. Many bug fixes also present. The AMDGPU virtual display support is useful and we have been looking forward to it. GPU reset improvements are also welcome for better recovery when the GPU becomes hung. As is the case lately, most of these changes are focused around the newer AMDGPU DRM driver over the mature Radeon DRM code.
  • OpenGL ES 3.1 Comes For Intel Haswell On Mesa
    For those running Intel Haswell processors, hope is not lost in seeing new versions of OpenGL extensions with the Intel Mesa driver.

Security News

  • Wednesday's security updates
  • This Android botnet relies on Twitter for its commands
  • Android Security Flaw Exposes 1.4B Devices [Ed: Alternative headline is, "Android is very popular, it has billions of users. And yes, security ain’t perfect." When did the press ever publish a headline like, "Windows flaw leaves 2 billion PCs susceptible for remote takeover?" (happens a lot)]
  • Wildfire ransomware code cracked: Victims can now unlock encrypted files for free
    Victims of the Wildfire ransomware can get their encrypted files back without paying hackers for the privilege, after the No More Ransom initiative released a free decryption tool. No More Ransom runs a web portal that provides keys for unlocking files encrypted by various strains of ransomware, including Shade, Coinvault, Rannoh, Rakhn and, most recently, Wildfire. Aimed at helping ransomware victims retrieve their data, No More Ransom is a collaborative project between Europol, the Dutch National Police, Intel Security, and Kaspersky Lab. Wildfire victims are served with a ransom note demanding payment of 1.5 Bitcoins -- the cryptocurrency favored by cybercriminals -- in exchange for unlocking the encrypted files. However, cybersecurity researchers from McAfee Labs, part of Intel Security, point out that the hackers behind Wildfire are open to negotiation, often accepting 0.5 Bitcoins as a payment. Most victims of the ransomware are located in the Netherlands and Belgium, with the malicious software spread through phishing emails aimed at Dutch speakers. The email claims to be from a transport company and suggests that the target has missed a parcel delivery -- encouraging them to fill in a form to rearrange delivery for another date. It's this form which drops Wildfire ransomware onto the victim's system and locks it down.

today's howtos

Openwashing