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Google

Android 9 Pie

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Google
  • Android 9 Pie

    Android 9 harnesses the power of artificial intelligence to give you more from your phone. Now it's smarter, faster and adapts as you use it.

  • Google finalizes Android P as Android 9 “Pie,” launching today

    Android Pie is a major update for Android. Large chunks of the OS get a UI makeover in line with Google's updated Material Design guidelines. There is an all-new notification panel, a reworked recent-apps screen, new settings, and tons of system UI changes. There's support for devices with notched displays (like the iPhone X) and a gesture navigation system (also like the iPhone X). So far, battery life on the preview builds has been great, with improvements like the AI-powered adaptive battery system, a new auto-brightness algorithm, and changes to CPU background processing.

  • Android 9 Pie Is Finally Released: Get It Now

    At last, the wait is over! Google has finally started shipping the stable version of Android 9.0 for smartphones. Fans who placed their money on Popsicle, Popcorn, Pistachio, sad news for you guys — the new Android P is now “Android Pie.”

Raspberry Pi now officially supports Google's TensorFlow software

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Linux
Google

Since its launch in 2015, the software firm has had a goal to be "an open source machine learning framework for everyone". But to do that, it has needed to run on as many of the platforms that people are using as possible.

"We've long supported Linux, MacOS, Windows, iOS, and Android, but despite the heroic efforts of many contributors, running TensorFlow on a Raspberry Pi has involved a lot of work," the company's software engineer, Pete Warden, said in a blog post on Medium.

However, thanks to a recent collaboration with the Raspberry Pi Foundation, it announced that the latest 1.9 release of TensorFlow can be installed from pre-built binaries using Python's pip package system.

Read more

How Google decides to open source its technology

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Google
OSS

Google has a solid reputation as an engineering organisation with an open source culture, with Googlers contributing a huge amount of code back to the community and projects like TensorFlow and Kubernetes making a mainstream impact.

Speaking to the press during the Google Cloud Next event in San Francisco last week, Sarah Novotny, head of open source strategy at Google Cloud Platform (GCP) and Melody Meckfessel, VP of engineering for GCP, spoke candidly about how the company decides to open source its technology and building an open culture.

"Google has a long history of engaging in open source communities," Novotny started out by saying. "We've had an open source programs office for more than 12 years and have worked with several other large companies to come into this space in a way that protects both the company and the projects and the culture of the projects."

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Chromebook Marketing Badmouths Windows, MacOS

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GNU
Linux
Google
Microsoft
Mac

Linux Apps may come to Chromebooks in Stable Channel In Version 69

Filed under
Linux
Google

We were originally hoping that Chrome OS version 68 would get Linux App support, but that wasn’t the case. Now, Chrome 69 is said to be released for the 4th September this year. (Not too long left to go) and the update has a strong chance to hit Google’s very own Chromebook first instead of the other Chromebook. This information is gleaned from several commits that suggest a review of the Crostini project will now finalise.

Without the upcoming update, Linux app support is already available on a fair amount of Chrome OS laptops that are running the Dev Channel version of the Chrome OS. The fair amount of Chrome OS laptops, which includes Google’s own Pixelbook and HP’s Chromebook x2, can potentially run Linux Apps. But, as many of these laptops are not high specification machines, they might (will) struggle to adequately run Linux Apps.

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OS Turf Wars

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GNU
Linux
Google
Microsoft
  • Build your own Chrome/Linux operating system with Chromium OS and Crostini

    Google is slowly starting to add support for running Linux applications on Chromebooks. But as I discovered when I tested Linux apps on the Acer Chromebook Tab 10 recently, it’s still a work in progress. The feature also isn’t available for all Chrome OS computers yet.

    That could change in the not-too-distant future. Right now you need to be running Chrome OS in the developer channel in order to enable Linux app support. There are signs that Linux app support could hit the Chrome OS beta channel this week, and it could graduate to the stable channel by the time Chrome OS 69 is released later this year.

  • Germans swing another putsch against Linux [Ed: This isn't a technical decision. It cannot be technical. I reckon some politicians/suits had too many dinners with Microsoft and maybe bribes too (like the Munich saga)]

    As initially reported by Heise, the state's tax authority has 13,000 workstations running OpenSuse -- which it adopted in 2006 in a well-received migration from Solaris -- that it now wants to migrate to a "current version" of Windows, presumably Windows 10.

  • With DaaS Windows coming, say goodbye to your PC as you know it

    Now Microsoft, which helped lead that revolution, is trying to return us to that old, centralized control model.

    Forget that noise. If Microsoft continues on this course, soon your only real choices if you really want a “desktop” operating system will be Linux and macOS. Oh, you’ll still have “Windows.” But Windows as your “personal” desktop? It will be history.

Google: The Data Transfer Project, Fuchsia, Cirq, Chrome 69

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Google
  • The Data Transfer Project and the Hammer

    Got that? There are actually two conversions each time data passes back or forth: first from the proprietary API of Company A into the Data Model for that type of information, and then from the Data Model to the proprietary API of Company B. With the standards approach, Company A simply sends its data to Company B directly without the need for conversion even once, because both companies create and store data using the same format.

     

    Stated another way, using adapters is a band aid approach that allows proprietary vendors to continue to use proprietary technology to silo your data, while providing just enough mobility to users to permit them to tolerate the continuation of life as we know it and compliance with evolving regulations, such as the GDPR.

     

    In short, using an open source hammer treats the user as a nail. Using open standards would turn the user into a hammer, empowering her to use whatever vendor she wishes, and putting the maximum incentive on all vendors to compete on services, features and performance to earn the user’s continued business.

     

    I think we can all agree that users would rather be the hammer. We’ve all been the nail for far too long, and all it’s given us is headaches.

     

  • What is Fuchsia, and why should you care?

    But an operating system needs more than a name. And without Google telling us anything about its new project, we're left to piece together all the breadcrumbs the internet can find. Here is what we know so far.

  • Google Cirq: a Python Open Source Library for Quantum Computing

    Cirq aims to make it easier to write, manipulate, and optimize quantum algorithms for noisy intermediate scale quantum (NISQ) computers. Cirq also enables the execution of those programs on a local simulator and is designed to support future quantum hardware and quantum cloud processors.

    Noisy intermediate scale quantum computers will be the first quantum computers that will become available in the near future and that have been announced by several companies, including Microsoft, Google, IBM, Intel, and others. Comprised of 50–100 qubits, NISQ computers aim to allows researchers to demonstrate quantum supremacy, although their usefulness will be limited by quantum gates noise and thus by the efficiency of error correction algorithms that will be designed.

  • Linux Apps on Chromebooks Could Hit Stable In Chrome 69

    It’s been a bit since we’ve talked about Linux apps on Chromebooks, but that doesn’t mean development has stopped. Actually, progress has been constantly moving forward with small tweaks and changes happening almost daily. The big changes, however, haven’t been as rapid-fire since I/O back in May, so news surrounding the Crostini project has been a bit quieter overall.

Google moves AndroidX to the Android Open Source Project

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Android
Google
OSS

Google is attempting to provide more transparency to developers by moving AndroidX, which was previously called the Android Support Library, to the public Android Open Source Project (AOSP). This move means that primary feature development and bug fixes will be completed in the open and changes will be visible.

AndroidX originally started off as a small set of libraries wtih the intent to provide backwards compatibility for new Android platform APIs, and as a result, its development was strictly tied to the platform. All work was done in internal Google branches and then pushed to the AOSP.

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Chromebooks/Chromecast Programs

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Google
  • The Best Photo Editors for Chromebooks

    One of the biggest question we see about Chromebooks is “can they run Photoshop?” The answer to that is no—at least not the full version you’ll find on other platforms. But that doesn’t mean they can’t do photo editing.

    And that’s really the key here: knowing when you need Photoshop versus when you just need something to edit photos. There are some powerful tools available for Chromebooks—perhaps not quite as powerful as Photoshop, but they can get pretty dang close for most uses.

  • How To Connect Your Chromecast To VLC?

Google 'Cloudwashing' (Other Buzzwords Also) and Kubernetes

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Server
Google
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More in Tux Machines

Programming: Django, PHP, Polonius and More

  • Django 2.2 alpha 1 released
    Django 2.2 alpha 1 is now available. It represents the first stage in the 2.2 release cycle and is an opportunity for you to try out the changes coming in Django 2.2. Django 2.2 has a salmagundi of new features which you can read about in the in-development 2.2 release notes.
  • Eliminating PHP polyfills
    The Symfony project has recently created a set of pure-PHP polyfills for both PHP extensions and newer language features. It allows developers to add requirements upon those functions or language additions without increasing the system requirements upon end users. For the most part, I think this is a good thing, and valuable to have. We've done similar things inside MediaWiki as well for CDB support, Memcached, and internationalization, just to name a few. But the downside is that on platforms where it is possible to install the missing PHP extensions or upgrade PHP itself, we're shipping empty code. MediaWiki requires both the ctypes and mbstring PHP extensions, and our servers have those, so there's no use in deploying polyfills for those, because they'll never be used. In September, Reedy and I replaced the polyfills with "unpolyfills" that simply provide the correct package, so the polyfill is skipped by composer. That removed about 3,700 lines of code from what we're committing, reviewing, and deploying - a big win.
  • Polonius and region errors
    Now that NLL has been shipped, I’ve been doing some work revisiting the Polonius project. Polonius is the project that implements the “alias-based formulation” described in my older blogpost. Polonius has come a long way since that post; it’s now quite fast and also experimentally integrated into rustc, where it passes the full test suite.
  • Serious Python released!
    Well, Serious Python is the the new name of The Hacker's Guide to Python — the first book I published. Serious Python is the 4th update of that book — but with a brand a new name and a new editor!

today's howtos

Ditching Out-of-Date Documentation Infrastructure

Long ago, the Linux kernel started using 00-Index files to list the contents of each documentation directory. This was intended to explain what each of those files documented. Henrik Austad recently pointed out that those files have been out of date for a very long time and were probably not used by anyone anymore. This is nothing new. Henrik said in his post that this had been discussed already for years, "and they have since then grown further out of date, so perhaps it is time to just throw them out." He counted hundreds of instances where the 00-index file was out of date or not present when it should have been. He posted a patch to rip them all unceremoniously out of the kernel. Joe Perches was very pleased with this. He pointed out that .rst files (the kernel's native documentation format) had largely taken over the original purpose of those 00-index files. He said the oo-index files were even misleading by now. Read more

Mozilla: Rust 1.32.0, Privacy, UX and Firefox Nightly

  • Announcing Rust 1.32.0
    The Rust team is happy to announce a new version of Rust, 1.32.0. Rust is a programming language that is empowering everyone to build reliable and efficient software.
  • Rust 1.32 Released With New Debugger Macro, Jemalloc Disabled By Default
    For fans of Rustlang, it's time to fire up rustup: Rust 1.32 is out today as the latest feature update for this increasingly popular programming language. The Rust 1.32 release brings dbg!() as a new debug macro to print the value of a variable as well as its file/line-number and it works with more than just variables but also commands.
  • Julien Vehent: Maybe don't throw away your VPN just yet...
    At Mozilla, we've long adopted single sign on, first using SAML, nowadays using OpenID Connect (OIDC). Most of our applications, both public facing and internal, require SSO to protect access to privileged resources. We never trust the network and always require strong authentication. And yet, we continue to maintain VPNs to protect our most sensitive admin panels. "How uncool", I hear you object, "and here we thought you were all about DevOps and shit". And you would be correct, but I'm also pragmatic, and I can't count the number of times we've had authentication bugs that let our red team or security auditors bypass authentication. The truth is, even highly experienced programmers and operators make mistakes and will let a bug disable or fail to protect part of that one super sensitive page you never want to leave open to the internet. And I never blame them because SSO/OAuth/OIDC are massively complex protocols that require huge libraries that fail in weird and unexpected ways. I've never reached the point where I fully trust our SSO, because we find one of those auth bypass every other month. Here's the catch: they never lead to major security incidents because we put all our admin panels behind a good old VPN.
  • Reflections on a co-design workshop
    Co-design workshops help designers learn first-hand the language of the people who use their products, in addition to their pain points, workflows, and motivations. With co-design methods [1] participants are no longer passive recipients of products. Rather, they are involved in the envisioning and re-imagination of them. Participants show us what they need and want through sketching and design exercises. The purpose of a co-design workshop is not to have a pixel-perfect design to implement, rather it’s to learn more about the people who use or will use the product, and to involve them in generating ideas about what to design. We ran a co-design workshop at Mozilla to inform our product design, and we’d like to share our experience with you. [...] Our UX team was tasked with improving the Firefox browser extension experience. When people create browser extensions, they use a form to submit their creations. They submit their code and all the metadata about the extension (name, description, icon, etc.). The metadata provided in the submission form is used to populate the extension’s product page on addons.mozilla.org.
  • Firefox Nightly: These Weeks in Firefox: Issue 51