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Samsung’s Chromebook Plus now supports GNU/Linux apps

Filed under
GNU
Linux
Google
  • Samsung’s Chromebook Plus now supports Linux apps

    Google began bringing Linux app support to Chrome OS almost exactly one month ago, but it only started with a single device, the very expensive Pixelbook. Now, that’s changing: Linux support is becoming available for Samsung’s Chromebook Plus as well, as spotted by users on Reddit.

  • Samsung Chromebook Plus is second device to support Linux apps

    The idea of Chromebooks (and Chrome OS in general) supporting Linux apps changes the game for the Chrome OS ecosystem. If Chromebooks support Linux apps there suddenly are so many more applications available to run, which makes Chromebooks a more robust competitor to Windows and Mac laptops.

    However, the only Chromebook that supported Linux apps when Google announced the feature was the Pixelbook – probably the most expensive Chromebook on the market.

    But some savvy Redditors just found that the much-more-reasonably-priced Samsung Chromebook Plus now supports Linux apps as well. It’s a little tricky to get them installed, but the support is there nonetheless.

Chromebooks: GNU/Linux on Samsung Chromebook Plus and More

Filed under
GNU
Linux
Google
  • Samsung Chromebook Plus is second Chromebook to support Linux apps (Project Crostini)

    Google announced last month that it was bringing the ability to run Linux apps to Chromebooks, confirming the existence of Project Crostini, which was first spotted in the Chromium code earlier this year, and which adventurous users have been testing for months.

    Up until now you’ve needed a Google Pixelbook to try Crostini. Now it looks like Google has added support for a second Chromebook.

    Several users have noted in recent days that Crostini now works on the Samsung Chromebook Plus, allowing you to run desktop Linux apps alongside Chrome apps.

  • Samsung Chromebook Plus now supports Linux apps in Dev channel

    There has been a lot of exciting stuff happening in the world of Chrome OS, but the most exciting development might be Linux apps. Chrome OS started as a simple web-based “OS,” but the addition of the Play Store, and now Linux apps, has made it a respectable operation system (no air quotes required). The Samsung Chromebook Plus now supports Linux apps on the Dev channel.

  • Linux app support arrives on the Samsung Chromebook Plus

    Google officially announced Linux app support on Chrome OS at I/O 2018, but until now, the only supported model has been the Pixelbook. The Linux VM requires a kernel version that many Chromebooks don't have, but with Google backporting the required functionality to earlier kernels, we can only speculate which models will actually be supported.

    There was mounting evidence that the Samsung Chromebook Plus would eventually have Linux apps, and now Google has confirmed that. Users on the Chrome OS Dev channel can now enable Linux app support on the Chromebook Plus, just as they would on the Pixelbook (full instructions here).

  • Google’s Pixelbook, the world’s best Chromebook, just dropped to its lowest price ever

    When it comes to Chromebooks, there’s the Google Pixelbook and then there’s everything else. People often think of dirt-cheap laptops when they think of Google’s Chrome OS and of Chromebooks. Entry-level models are fantastic for anyone looking for a low-cost computer for basic work and streaming, and that’s why they’re so popular in the education market. But what happens when you get older and you want a Chromebook with some kick? That’s where the Pixelbook comes in, and it has more than enough kick for anything you might want to throw at it.

  • What to look for in a used Chromebook

    One of the best Chromebook features often gets overlooked: over six years of operating system support direct from Google. That means you get all the new features that come to Chrome OS (provided your hardware allows) as well as security fixes and those tiny updates that make things just work better. That means a Chromebook you buy today will still be supported in 2024, and a Chromebook that sold new in 2016 still has four years of updates ahead of it.

  • Google Could Let Chromebook Users Manage All of Their Android Files in Chrome OS

    Chromium evangelist at Google François Beaufort revealed the fact that the Chrome OS team is planning to add support for managing all our Android files on Chromebook devices from within the Files app.

    Dubbed "Android Files," the new feature has been implemented in the Chrome OS Dev channel and promises to let Chromebook owners manage all of their Android files with the default Files app in the Chrome OS operating system. At the moment, Chromebook users can only access image, video and audio files from their Android devices, but this change could let them access all file types.

Security: Updates, Security Podcast and Google Groups Misconfiguration

Filed under
Google
Security

​The Killer Chromebook: Google's i7 Pixelbook

Filed under
GNU
Linux
Google

Now, I've liked Chromebooks since the experimental Cr-48 rolled out in late 2010. And, when Google released its first high-end Chromebook, 2013's Pixel, I was sold. I slowly but surely put away my Linux-powered Lenovo ThinkPads and started replacing them with Google's high-end Chromebooks. Why? Because they're better than any other laptop out there.

What's that? You can't do as much with a Chromebook that you can do with, say, a MacBook Pro 13 or a Lenovo Yoga 920. Oh please!

Read more

The Best Chromebooks You Can Buy, 2018 Edition

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GNU
Linux
Google

There has never been a better time to get into the Chromebook scene, so you’re in a great position to make the leap. If you’re having a hard time figure out which Chromebook to buy, we’re here to help.

Chrome OS has really matured over the last few years, with the addition of Android apps on pretty much all modern Chromebooks. This really opened the available applications to include many options that were previously lacking on Chrome OS—like image editors, for example.

With all the progress Google has been making on Chrome OS as a whole, it’s clear that the company is fully invested in this operating system and has a focused vision for the future. Chrome OS has broken out of the “just a browser” mold and is inching closer to the “full operating system” space.

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SD Times Open Source Project of the Week: Bazel

Filed under
Google
OSS

The project is led by a core group of contributors and Googlers, and managed by the community. The group of core contributors is self-managing and added by two supporting votes from other core contributors.

According to Google, some parts of Bazel will never make it into open source because it integrates with Google-specific technology or the company plans to get rid of those features in the future.

The Angular team has announced plans to migrate its build scripts with Bazel to get faster and more reliable incremental builds. As of Angular 6, Angular itself is now built with Bazel, according to Stephen Fluin, developer advocate for Angular. “Bazel is the build system that Google and the Angular team use to keep incremental builds under 2 seconds,” the team wrote in a post.

Bazel is already being used by companies such as Asana, Ascend.io, Databricks, Dropbox, Etsy, Google, Huawei, LingoChamp, Pinterest and Uber. Open-source projects using Bazel include Angular, Deepmind Lab, GRPC, gVisor, Kubernetes, Sonnet, TensorFlow and Trunk.

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GSoC and GNOME

Filed under
Google
GNOME
  • GSoC 2018 with GNOME: Internationalization of Fractal (part 1)

    It is the beginning of the coding period and I will first work on investigating on implementing the internationalization of Fractal and then find a way to do it. At this moment, internationalization support in Rust is limited and new, so no GTK application written in Rust have implemented it yet. And it is very exciting to work on this with this perspective, furthermore because I will write some blogposts that will try to explain how to do it and I hope it could help other people to do so!

  • Implementation of the PartialEq trait for Message
  • Improving the development experience for GNOME Settings

    After Bastien and Rui announced that they were stepping down from maintainership of GNOME Settings, I went ahead and volunteered to take care of it. This was not a random act, though; for quite some time, I’ve been adding and changing code all around. I was pretty involved in moving to the new layout, and with the help of other contributors, implemented the redesigns of various panels. Clearly, I have a technical debt to the app.

    Adding to that, assuming maintainership over it also aligns well with the goals of my employer, Endless, and gives a nice upstream/downstream overlap. With that, I can spend a bigger chunk of my work time on upstream tasks. Moreover, it allows us to have a stronger relationship with the GNOME community — after all, it allows me to bridge the insights and knowledge we gain from our users to a wider community.

  • Google Summer of Code 2018 at GNOME

    Hi! I am Aditya Manglik from Wien, a.k.a. carpediem on IRC. Currently I am pursuing a Bachelor’s thesis in Deep Learning from TU Wien. I am interested in software, operating systems and AI. Travel, hiking and football occupy rest of the time.

    I started with Linux ~7 years ago when my Windows desktop failed to boot because of a curious experiment accident with system32 files. Looking back at that moment, I am glad for the few hours of initial pain which was worth several years of sanity. Since then I have been working with Linux as the primary platform. I like Open Source Software because it’s much more fun to break and fix something, which really helps understand what’s happening in the machine. I used to like C/ C++ quite a bit, but you can probably throw any language and I am happy to learn it.

'Proper' GNU/Linux Software on Chrome OS

Filed under
GNU
Linux
Google
  • A closer look at Chrome OS using LXD to run Linux GUI apps (Project Crostini)

    Project Crostini is the Chrome OS project to add support to run Linux GUI apps on Chrome OS.

    The components that facilitate Project Crostini can be found at https://github.com/lstoll/cros-crostini That page has instructions for those that wanted to enable the running of Linux GUI apps on Chrome OS, when Project Crostini was still under development. Lincoln Stoll dissected the source of Chrome OS and created a helpful list of the involved repositories.

    The basic component is The Chrome OS Virtual Machine Monitor (crossvm), which runs untrusted operating systems through Linux’s KVM interface. The Linux distribution would run in a VM. The test repositories make reference to the X server, XWayland and Wayland. There is a repository called sommelier, which is a nested Wayland compositor with X11 forwarding support. It needs more searching to figure out where the source code ended into the Chrome OS repository and what is actually being used.

    Update #1: Here are the vm_tools in Chrome OS. They include garcon, a service that gets added in the container and communicates with another service outside of the container (vm_concierge).

    What is important, is that LXD runs in this VM and is configured to launch a machine container with a Linux distribution. We are going in depth into this.

  • Linux On Chromebooks Now Official

    Among other news from Google I/O 2018, Google is making it possible to code on Chromebooks. Whether it’s building an app or writing a quick script, Chromebooks will be available for coding projects.

  • Android apps on Chromebooks can finally access SD card storage

    It’s been nearly two years since Google started rolling out a feature that lets you run Android apps on Chromebooks. And while Android support has come a long way, there’s one thing Android apps couldn’t do on Chromebooks… until now: access an SD card.

    But starting with the latest Chrome OS beta, it looks like Android apps on Chromebooks can access the SD card… although it seems like the feature is still very much a work in progress.

Android P, Android Things and Mozilla Things Gateway

Filed under
Android
Google
Moz/FF
  • Android P to improve users' network privacy

    The forthcoming Android P release will protect the operating system's network processes against snoops and nasties.

    Android's problems lie in a folder and file inherited from Linux, the source of Android's kernel and its key structures: /proc/net.

    In a commit at Android Open Source, Google's Jeffrey Vander Stoep launched the apparently-prosaic process of “locking down /proc/net”.

  • Say Hello to Android Things 1.0

    Android Things is Google's managed OS that enables you to build and maintain Internet of Things devices at scale. We provide a robust platform that does the heavy lifting with certified hardware, rich developer APIs, and secure managed software updates using Google's back-end infrastructure, so you can focus on building your product.

    After a developer preview with over 100,000 SDK downloads, we're releasing Android Things 1.0 to developers today with long-term support for production devices. Developer feedback and engagement has been critical in our journey towards 1.0, and we are grateful to the over 10,000 developers who have provided us feedback through the issue tracker, at workshop events, and through our Google+ community.

  • Google Launches New Operating System “Android Things” For IoT Devices

    Google has tried to take some attention away from Build 2018 by releasing Android Things 1.0 – an operating system specially designed for Internet of Things (IoT) devices.

    Android Things was first announced back in 2016. It will allow developers to take advantage of Google Assistant, Google Cast, and the company’s knowledge of machine learning.

  • Things Gateway - the Virtual Weather Station Code

    The Virtual Weather Station was written using Things Framework, a new communication protocol to connect devices with controllers based on Web technology. The Things Framework consists of a set libraries and modules written in various languages. Each library implements a server that offers the Web Thing API on behalf of the device running the server. The protocol is HTTP, so the server offers a Web interface by embedding a Web Server. That interface contains all the mechanisms to query or control the device and is, therefore, the embodiment of the Web Thing API.

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Kernel: Virtme, 2018 Linux Audio Miniconference and Linux Foundation Articles

  • Virtme: The kernel developers' best friend
    When working on the Linux Kernel, testing via QEMU is pretty common. Many virtual drivers have been recently merged, useful either to test the kernel core code, or your application. These virtual drivers make QEMU even more attractive.
  • 2018 Linux Audio Miniconference
    As in previous years we’re trying to organize an audio miniconference so we can get together and talk through issues, especially design decisons, face to face. This year’s event will be held on Sunday October 21st in Edinburgh, the day before ELC Europe starts there.
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    At the recent Open Source Summit in Vancouver, I participated in a panel discussion called How Writing can Change Your Career for the Better (Even if You don't Identify as a Writer. The panel was moderated by Rikki Endsley, Community Manager and Editor for Opensource.com, and it included VM (Vicky) Brasseur, Open Source Strategy Consultant; Alex Williams, Founder, Editor in Chief, The New Stack; and Dawn Foster, Consultant, The Scale Factory.
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    A new crop of high-value open source software projects stands ready to make a big impact in enterprise production, but structural issues like governance, IPR, and long-term maintenance plague OSS communities at every turn. Meanwhile, facing significant pressures from open source software and the industry groups that support them, standards development organizations are fighting harder than ever to retain members and publish innovative standards. What can these two vastly different philosophies learn from each other, and can they do it in time to ensure they remain relevant for the next 10 years?

Red Hat: PodCTL, Security Embargos at Red Hat and Energy Sector

  • [Podcast] PodCTL #50 – Listener Mailbag Questions
    As the community around PodCTL has grown (~8000 weekly listeners) we’ve constantly asked them to give us feedback on topics to discuss and areas where they want to learn. This week we discussed and answered a number of questions about big data and analytics, application deployments, routing security, and storage deployment models.
  • Security Embargos at Red Hat
    The software security industry uses the term Embargo to describe the period of time that a security flaw is known privately, prior to a deadline, after which time the details become known to the public. There are no concrete rules for handling embargoed security flaws, but Red Hat uses some industry standard guidelines on how we handle them. When an issue is under embargo, Red Hat cannot share information about that issue prior to it becoming public after an agreed upon deadline. It is likely that any software project will have to deal with an embargoed security flaw at some point, and this is often the case for Red Hat.
  • Transforming oil & gas: Exploration and production will reap the rewards
    Through advanced technologies based on open standards, Red Hat deliver solutions that can support oil and gas companies as they modernize their IT infrastructures and build a framework to meet market and technology challenges. Taking advantage of modern, open architectures can help oil and gas providers attract new customers and provide entry into markets where these kinds of services were technologically impossible a decade ago.