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Google: The Data Transfer Project, Fuchsia, Cirq, Chrome 69

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Google
  • The Data Transfer Project and the Hammer

    Got that? There are actually two conversions each time data passes back or forth: first from the proprietary API of Company A into the Data Model for that type of information, and then from the Data Model to the proprietary API of Company B. With the standards approach, Company A simply sends its data to Company B directly without the need for conversion even once, because both companies create and store data using the same format.

     

    Stated another way, using adapters is a band aid approach that allows proprietary vendors to continue to use proprietary technology to silo your data, while providing just enough mobility to users to permit them to tolerate the continuation of life as we know it and compliance with evolving regulations, such as the GDPR.

     

    In short, using an open source hammer treats the user as a nail. Using open standards would turn the user into a hammer, empowering her to use whatever vendor she wishes, and putting the maximum incentive on all vendors to compete on services, features and performance to earn the user’s continued business.

     

    I think we can all agree that users would rather be the hammer. We’ve all been the nail for far too long, and all it’s given us is headaches.

     

  • What is Fuchsia, and why should you care?

    But an operating system needs more than a name. And without Google telling us anything about its new project, we're left to piece together all the breadcrumbs the internet can find. Here is what we know so far.

  • Google Cirq: a Python Open Source Library for Quantum Computing

    Cirq aims to make it easier to write, manipulate, and optimize quantum algorithms for noisy intermediate scale quantum (NISQ) computers. Cirq also enables the execution of those programs on a local simulator and is designed to support future quantum hardware and quantum cloud processors.

    Noisy intermediate scale quantum computers will be the first quantum computers that will become available in the near future and that have been announced by several companies, including Microsoft, Google, IBM, Intel, and others. Comprised of 50–100 qubits, NISQ computers aim to allows researchers to demonstrate quantum supremacy, although their usefulness will be limited by quantum gates noise and thus by the efficiency of error correction algorithms that will be designed.

  • Linux Apps on Chromebooks Could Hit Stable In Chrome 69

    It’s been a bit since we’ve talked about Linux apps on Chromebooks, but that doesn’t mean development has stopped. Actually, progress has been constantly moving forward with small tweaks and changes happening almost daily. The big changes, however, haven’t been as rapid-fire since I/O back in May, so news surrounding the Crostini project has been a bit quieter overall.

Google moves AndroidX to the Android Open Source Project

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Android
Google
OSS

Google is attempting to provide more transparency to developers by moving AndroidX, which was previously called the Android Support Library, to the public Android Open Source Project (AOSP). This move means that primary feature development and bug fixes will be completed in the open and changes will be visible.

AndroidX originally started off as a small set of libraries wtih the intent to provide backwards compatibility for new Android platform APIs, and as a result, its development was strictly tied to the platform. All work was done in internal Google branches and then pushed to the AOSP.

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Chromebooks/Chromecast Programs

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Google
  • The Best Photo Editors for Chromebooks

    One of the biggest question we see about Chromebooks is “can they run Photoshop?” The answer to that is no—at least not the full version you’ll find on other platforms. But that doesn’t mean they can’t do photo editing.

    And that’s really the key here: knowing when you need Photoshop versus when you just need something to edit photos. There are some powerful tools available for Chromebooks—perhaps not quite as powerful as Photoshop, but they can get pretty dang close for most uses.

  • How To Connect Your Chromecast To VLC?

Google 'Cloudwashing' (Other Buzzwords Also) and Kubernetes

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Server
Google

Google Promotes 'Security' and Lock-in

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Google
  • The Key to Trust

    As the principal inventor behind both the Security Key and U2F protocol, we are true supporters of open standards. To realize our mission of making secure login ubiquitous, we designed the original Security Key, and provided the majority of the open source code and test tools for FIDO U2F and the latest version of the standard, FIDO2, which offers a passwordless experience.

  • Google takes on Yubico and builds its own hardware security keys

    Google today announced it is launching its own hardware security keys for two-factor authentication. These so-called Titan Security Keys will go up against similar keys from companies like Yubico, which Google has long championed as the de facto standard for hardware-based two-factor authentication for Gmail and other services.

  • Google Launches ‘Titan Security Key’ To Boost Your Online Security

    Google has launched the public version of the security key used to protect its 85,000 employees from phishing and other cyber attacks during internal testing. Named Titan, it falls under the category of physical security keys that are known to provide better protection than other forms of 2-step verification including OTPs.

  • Connect Google Cloud Identity with Linux® [Ed: Anything “aaS” means surveillance]

    Unfortunately, Google’s view of their IDaaS platform doesn’t include systems operating outside of GCP. So, with respect to this blog post, the concept of connecting Google Cloud Identity with Linux machines hosted at AWS, Azure, on-prem, or anywhere else that is outside of Google’s ecosystem simply doesn’t work with Google Cloud Identity alone.

  • Cloud Services Platform: bringing the best of the cloud to you

Security Updates and Google Warnings

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Google
Security

Chrome: New in Google Chrome and Chrome OS

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Google
  • Google tests curvy Chrome tabs with material design overhaul

    Google is trying out a new Chrome interface that for the first time in a decade presents a very different look for the tabs and address bar at the top of the widely used web browser.

    Since its public debut in 2008, Chrome has featured a trapezoidal tab for each website you have open. But tabs now look very different on Chrome Canary -- a very rough-around-the-edges version used to test changes before they reach a broader audience. The active tab has a slope-shouldered look with curved corners. The grayed-out inactive tabs merge with the the browser itself and are separated only by thin vertical lines. In addition, the address bar's text box is a gray oval against a white backdrop, instead of a round-cornered white rectangle with a hairline border.

  • Google Testing A Revamped Interface For Chrome With Curvy Tabs

    Chrome users have long complained about the browser’s dull interface and slow performance. But that is going to change soon. As mentioned by CNET, Google is testing out a new interface in the Chrome Canary channel.

  • 8 New Features Under Development: Google Chrome and Chrome OS Updates

    Google Chrome is undoubtedly the most popular web browser right now. With a 58% market share worldwide, Chrome has defeated every other option out there. But that doesn’t mean it is perfect in every way. Google has received more than enough complaints about leaving its browser unattended for years now.

    Since the browser made public debut in 2008, the browser has never seen a massive update. But this time, it looks like Google has finally set eyes on its best project. The Alphabet-owned Google is reportedly working on new features for Chrome that will solve most of the issues users face with the browser.

Google’s iron grip on Android: Controlling open source by any means necessary

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Android
Google

Today, things are a little different. Android went from zero percent of the smartphone market to owning nearly 80 percent of it. Android has arguably won the smartphone wars, but "Android winning" and "Google winning" are not necessarily the same thing. Since Android is open source, it doesn't really "belong" to Google. Anyone is free to take it, clone the source, and create their own fork or alternate version.

As we've seen with the struggles of Windows Phone and Blackberry 10, app selection is everything in the mobile market, and Android's massive install base means it has a ton of apps. If a company forks Android, the OS will already be compatible with millions of apps; a company just needs to build its own app store and get everything uploaded. In theory, you'd have a non-Google OS with a ton of apps, virtually overnight. If a company other than Google can come up with a way to make Android better than it is now, it would be able to build a serious competitor and possibly threaten Google's smartphone dominance. This is the biggest danger to Google's current position: a successful, alternative Android distribution.

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Google and Android

Filed under
Android
Google
  • Google Partners With Zapata on Open-Source Quantum Computing Effort
  • Google launches quantum framework Cirq, plans Bristlecone cloud move

    Google today launched Cirq, an open source framework for running algorithms on the quantum computers that will be available in the near future.

    A common problem researchers face when designing quantum algorithms for today’s quantum computers – the 50 to 100 qubit Noisy Intermediate-Scale Quantum devices – is in working within the limitations and nuances of the hardware.

  • Google wants to make programming quantum computers easier
  • Google Adds Kubernetes to Rebranded Cloud Marketplace

    Google's goal is to make containers accessible to everyone, especially the enterprise, according to Anil Dhawan, product manager for the Google Cloud Platform.

    When Google released Kubernetes as open source, one of the first challenges that the industry tackled was management, he said.

    Google's hosted Kubernetes Engine takes care of cluster orchestration and management. A bigger challenge to getting apps running on a Kubernetes cluster can be a manual, time-consuming process. GCP Marketplace provides prepackaged apps and deploys them onto any cluster, Dhawan noted.

    Google makes the process safer by testing and vetting all Kubernetes apps listed on GCP Marketplace. That process includes vulnerability scanning and partner agreements for maintenance and support.

  • Is Google Replacing Android with Fuchsia? Maybe, But Not for a Long Time

    Today Bloomberg is reporting that Google’s new Project Fuchsia operating system might actually be a successor to Android. Since this will likely fuel speculation, we thought we’d weigh in with our completely uninformed educated guesses as well.

    For those who haven’t read our previous explainer on Project Fuchsia (recommended reading), it’s a completely new operating system in the very early stages of development. It’s meant to be a universal operating system, capable of running on everything from smart speakers and smartphones to desktop computers. The idea would be an operating system that can literally run the same code on every single smart device—the holy grail of operating systems.

  • As EU tightens screws on Android, Google focuses on a Fuchsia future

    Google plans to replace Android with Fuchsia beginning with a smart speaker in 2021, says Bloomberg. Fuchsia could help Google sidestep Android-related legal threats from Oracle and the EU, which just slapped Google with a $5.1 billion fine.

    A Bloomberg report based on information from undisclosed sources within Google claims the company is planning to use its emerging Project Fuchsia OS as a replacement for Android, embedded Linux, and Chrome OS in devices ranging from smart speakers to phones, and eventually laptops. The first Fuchsia based smart speakers are expected in 2021.

  • Samsung Plans to Launch Foldable-Screen Phone Early Next Year

    Samsung Electronics Co. is planning to introduce a foldable-screen smartphone early next year, according to people familiar with the matter, as the world’s largest phone maker eyes a splashy device to help re-energize its slumping handset business.

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  • Samsung’s Long-awaited Foldable Screen Smartphone Arriving In 2019: Report
  • 8 Best Android Emulators For 2018 To Experience Android On Your PC

    Android Emulators are seemingly becoming more popular as Android’s popularity keeps growing. From developers testing apps to gamers playing on a large screen, users yearn for experiencing Android operating system with a mouse and keyboard, coupled with high specifications of the PC.

  • How To Add Animated GIF As Your Android Home Button?
  • How to get an animated GIF as your home button on Android [Root]

Microsoft's Lobbying Campaign for Android Antitrust Woes

Filed under
Android
Google
  • Google Hints A Future Where Android Might NOT Be Free
  • Android has created more choice, not less
  • Google Fined Record $5 Billion by EU, Given 90 Days to Stop ‘Illegal Practices’

    EU regulators rejected arguments that Apple Inc. competes with Android, saying Apple’s phone software can’t be licensed by handset makers and that Apple phones are often priced outside many Android users’ purchasing power.

  • EU: Google illegally used Android to dominate search, must pay $5B fine

    Thirdly, Google allegedly ran afoul of EU rules by deterring manufacturers from using Android forks. Google "has prevented manufacturers wishing to pre-install Google apps from selling even a single smart mobile device running on alternative versions of Android that were not approved by Google," the commission said.

  • EU hits Google with US$5b fine over alleged Android misuse

    The European Union has hit Google with a second fine in as many years, demanding that the search behemoth pay €4.34 billion (US$5.05 billion, A$6.82 billion) for breaching anti-trust rules over its Android mobile operating system.

    Announcing the fine on Wednesday in Brussels, the EU said Google must end such conduct within 90 days or pay a penalty of up to 5% of the average daily turnover of its parent company, Alphabet.

    The company has said it will appeal against the fine.

  • iPhone users buy half as many apps as Android users, but spend twice as much

    Apple's app store is still yielding twice the revenue of Google Play, and yet is only recording half the number of downloads.

    The figures for Q1&2 of the year suggest Apple owners spent $22.6bn on apps, whilst Android users only spent $11.8bn.

  • The EU fining Google over Android is too little, too late, say experts

    The Play Store is free to use under licence from Google, but comes with a set of conditions smartphone manufacturers must meet. The most important of these, and the one the EC has a problem with, is the requirement to set Google as the default search engine and the pre-installation of certain apps, including Google Chrome, YouTube and the Google search app. Google also dictates that some of the pre-installed apps be placed on the homescreen.

  • Don’t Expect Big Changes from Europe’s Record Google Fine

    The decision by the European Commission, the EU’s regulatory arm, found that Google manages Android, which runs roughly 80 percent of the world’s smartphones, in ways that illegally harm competition. The ruling focused on three practices: the bundling of Google's Chrome web browser and its search app as a condition for licensing the Google Play store; payments Google makes to phone manufacturers and telecom companies to exclusively preinstall the Google search app on their devices; and Google's practice of prohibiting device makers from running Google apps on Android “forks,” or alternative versions of the software unapproved by Google. In its ruling, the commission ordered Google to stop all of those practices.

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OSS/Microsoft Openwashing Leftovers

Brave and Firefox Latest

  • Brave Browser Team Up With Tor
     

    TOR [sic] or The Onion Router uses technology that separates your computer from the website you’re viewing by routing the network traffic through 3 seperate servers before it reaches your computer. That being said Brave Core Beta hasn’t been fully tested yet so “users should not rely on it for serious use just yet,” Brave said.

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  • Your RSS is grass: Mozilla euthanizes feed reader, Atom code in Firefox browser, claims it's old and unloved
    When Firefox 64 arrives in December, support for RSS, the once celebrated content syndication scheme, and its sibling, Atom, will be missing. "After considering the maintenance, performance and security costs of the feed preview and subscription features in Firefox, we’ve concluded that it is no longer sustainable to keep feed support in the core of the product," said Gijs Kruitbosch, a software engineer who works on Firefox at Mozilla, in a blog post on Thursday. RSS – which stands for Rich Site Summary, RDF Site Summary, or Really Simple Syndication, as you see fit – is an XML-based format for publishing and subscribing to web content feeds. It dates back to 1999 and for a time was rather popular, but been disappearing from a variety of applications and services since then. Mozilla appears to have gotten the wrecking ball rolling in 2011 when it removed the RSS button from Firefox. The explanation then was the same as it is now: It's just not very popular.
  • Cameron Kaiser: It's baaaaa-aaack: TenFourFox Intel
    It's back! It's undead! It's ugly! It's possibly functional! It's totally unsupported! It's ... TenFourFox for Intel Macs! Years ago as readers of this blog will recall, Claudio Leite built TenFourFox 17.0.2 for Intel, which the update check-in server shows some determined users are still running to this day on 10.5 and even 10.4 despite various problems such as issue 209. However, he didn't have time to maintain it, and a newer version was never built, though a few people since then have made various attempts and submitted some patches. One of these attempts is now far enough along to the point where I'm permitted to announce its existence. Riccardo Mottola has done substantial work on getting TenFourFox to build and run again on old Intel Macs with a focus on 32-bit compatibility, and his patches have been silently lurking in the source code repository for some time. Along with Ken Cunningham's additional work, who now also has a MacPorts portfile so you can build it yourself (PowerPC support in the portfile is coming, though you can still use the official instructions, of course), enough functions in the new Intel build that it can be used for basic tasks.

Security: 'Smart' Locks, Windows in Weapons

Android Leftovers