Language Selection

English French German Italian Portuguese Spanish

Google

Chrome 69 Tip for GNU/Linux and Beta of Next Chrome Release

Filed under
Google
Web
  • Change UI theme in Google Chrome 69

    Say what you will about Chrome, but over the years, it has maintained a rather consistent look & feel. The changes are mostly done under the hood and they do not interfere with how the user interacts with the browser. But occasionally, mostly guided by their wider influence in the OS space, especially the mobile world, Google has made some stylistic changes. Most notably, they introduced Material Design to the Chrome UI, and now, there's another facelift.

    I noticed the new looks in the freshly updated Chrome 69 in Kubuntu Beaver, and I wasn't too happy. The font is gray and pale, ergo contrast isn't as good as it should be, and the new round design feels odd. So I decided to change this back to the older style. Let me show you how you can do this.

    [...]

    There you go. If you don't like the aesthetically pleasing but ergonomically dubious change to the Chrome's UI look in version 69 onwards, then you can change (we don't know for how long) the layout back to what it was, or try one of the several available themes. The goal is to retain maximum visual clarity and efficiency. The old looks offer that. The new ones hamper that.

    I am quite alarmed by this trend. The only solace I get is the knowledge that a few Google shares in me possession are generating profit, which I shall use to heal my soul of all this sub-IQ100 touch-led destruction of the desktop and fast productivity, a crusade that started worldwide around 2011 or so.

  • Chrome 70 beta: shape detection, web authentication, and more

    Unless otherwise noted, changes described below apply to the newest Chrome Beta channel release for Android, Chrome OS, Linux, macOS, and Windows. View a complete list of the features in Chrome 70 on ChromeStatus.com. Chrome 70 is beta as of September 13, 2018.

  • Chrome 70 In Beta With TLS 1.3, Opus Support In MP4 & AV1 Decode

    Following last week's Chrome 69 release, Chrome 70 is now in beta as the latest feature-update to Google's browser.

The best Linux apps for Chrome OS

Filed under
GNU
Linux
Google

Slowly but surely, Google is bringing support for Linux applications to Chrome OS. Even though the feature is primarily aimed at developers, like those who want to get Android Studio running on a Pixelbook, there are plenty of apps that can benefit normal users. We already have a guide about installing Linux apps on Chrome OS, but if you're not sure what to try, this post may point you in the right direction.

This isn't a simple compilation of the best Linux apps, because plenty of those exist already. Instead, the goal here is to recommend apps for tasks that cannot be adequately filled by web apps or Android applications. For example, serious photo editing isn't really possible through the web, and options on the Play Store are limited, but Gimp is perfect for it.

Read more

Chrome 69 Released for Linux, Mac and Windows. Here's What's New.

Filed under
Google

Google Chrome team released latest installment of Chrome version 69 for Linux, Windows and Mac. Here are the updates.

Google Chrome completed 10 years this month and with the anniversary, Chrome team presented users with new changes, updates. It has been a decade when Chrome first version released and since then it has been quite a journey with incremental updates which leads to this day.

Read more

10 Reasons to Buy Google Pixelbook Over a MacBook

Filed under
GNU
Linux
Google

With a touchscreen display, cornered Gorilla glass, backlit keyboard, 4 in 1 design that enables a more convenient use, 7th Gen Intel Core processor, fast charging battery that lasts 10 hours, and a premium aluminium build, the Google Pixelbook is the slickest and thinnest Chromebook yet.

Just recently, I had the opportunity to purchase either the Google Pixelbook or a MacBook and I went for the Google Pixelbook.

Read more

Latest on Chrome and Mozilla

Filed under
Google
Moz/FF
Web
  • Google Wants to Kill the URL

     

    The focus right now, they say, is on identifying all the ways people use URLs to try to find an alternative that will enhance security and identity integrity on the web while also adding convenience for everyday tasks like sharing links on mobile devices.

  • Keybase: "Our browser extension subverts our encryption, but why should we care?"

    Two days ago I decided to take a look at Keybase. Keybase does crypto, is open source and offers security bug bounties for relevant findings — just the perfect investigation subject for me. It didn’t take long for me to realize that their browser extension is deeply flawed, so I reported the issue to them via their bug bounty program. The response was rather… remarkable. It can be summed up as: “Yes, we know. But why should we care?”

  • Daniel Stenberg: DoH in curl

    DNS-over-HTTPS (DoH) is being designed (it is not an RFC quite yet but very soon!) to allow internet clients to get increased privacy and security for their name resolves. I've previously explained the DNS-over-HTTPS functionality within Firefox that ships in Firefox 62 and I did a presentation about DoH and its future in curl at curl up 2018.

    We are now introducing DoH support in curl. I hope this will not only allow users to start getting better privacy and security for their curl based internet transfers, but ideally this will also provide an additional debugging tool for DoH in other clients and servers.

    Let's take a look at how we plan to let applications enable this when using libcurl and how libcurl has to work with this internally to glue things together.

  • Firefox 63 Beta On Linux Finally Runs WebExtensions In Their Own Process

    With Firefox 62.0 having shipped, Mozilla promoted Firefox 63.0 to beta as part of their usual release cadence.

    With Firefox 63.0 there are several Windows 10 and macOS improvements including better multi-GPU handling on Macs, faster tab switching, and better Windows 10 integration. But for Linux users there is one notable platform-specific change and that is WebExtensions now running in their own process.

Chrome 69

Filed under
Google
Web
  • Google Chrome Update Brings A UI Revamp And New Password Manager With More Accurate Auto Filling

    Google Chrome is the go to browser for most people. With a simple UI and great performance, it has been the most dominant browser for quite sometime.

    Today Google dropped a big update for Chrome, on it’s 10th Birthday. There are a lot of changes, including a UI revamp, a new password manager and more.

  • Chrome 69 Brings UI Refinement, Initial AV1 Decoder, Picture-In-Picture API

    While Firefox is hitting version 62 this week, Google has introduced Chrome 69 as the newest version of their cross-platform web-browser that recently celebrated its tenth birthday.

    With this Chrome 69 browser update there is a visual refresh to the user-interface as Google developers adopted the Material 2 design principles for the desktop browser. Chrome 69 also has various security improvements, CSS conic gradients support, CSS scroll snap positions, and various other developer additions.

The Controversial Speck Encryption Code Will Indeed Be Dropped From The Linux Kernel

Filed under
Linux
Google
Security

While Google got the NSA-developed Speck into the Linux kernel on the basis of wanting to use Speck for file-system encryption on very low-end Android (Go) devices, last month they decided to abandon those plans and instead work out a new "HPolyC" algorithm for use on these bottom-tier devices due to all the concerns over Speck potentially being back-doored by the US National Security Agency.

After Google reverted their plans to use Speck for file-system encryption, it was called for removal from the Linux kernel with no other serious users of this code... Speck had been added to the crypto code in Linux 4.17 and then to the fscrypt bits for file-system encryption with Linux 4.18.

Read more

Firefox Extensions and Google Code-in 2018

Filed under
Development
Google
Moz/FF
Web
  • Extensions in Firefox 63

    Firefox 63 is rolling into Beta and it’s absolutely loaded with new features for extensions. There are some important new API, some major enhancements to existing API, and a large collection of miscellaneous improvements and bug fixes. All told, this is the biggest upgrade to the WebExtensions API since the release of Firefox Quantum.

    An upgrade this large would not have been possible in a single release without the hard work of our Mozilla community. Volunteer contributors landed over 25% of all the features and bug fixes for WebExtensions in Firefox 63, a truly remarkable effort. We are humbled and grateful for your support of Firefox and the open web. Thank you.

    Note: due to the large volume of changes in this release, the MDN documentation is still catching up. I’ve tried to link to MDN where possible, and more information will appear in the weeks leading up to the public release of Firefox 63.

  • Mozilla Addons Blog: September’s featured extensions
  • Announcing Google Code-in 2018: nine is just fine!

    We are excited to announce the 9th consecutive year of the Google Code-in (GCI) contest! Students ages 13 through 17 from around the world can learn about open source development by working on real open source projects, with mentorship from active developers. GCI begins on Tuesday, October 23, 2018 and runs for seven weeks, ending Wednesday, December 12, 2018.

    Google Code-in is unique because, not only do the students choose what they want to work on from the 2,500+ tasks created by open source organizations, but they have mentors available to help answer their questions as they work on each of their tasks.

  • A small HTTP debug server in Go

    Lately, I found myself to work on an application that was communicating via SOAP with a server. My goal was to understand how this application worked with the SOAP server to emulate its behavior. Even if I had access to the source code of the application, I thought it would have been easier, faster and more fun to do the work without actually reading the code. It’s important to note that actually, the application is fairly small and self-contained. Otherwise, I would have probably taken a different approach.

    Since I was not very interested in the application itself, but more to the SOAP API, I decided to handle the whole situation as a reverse-engineering effort. One nice thing about this application, like many others, is that it’s possible to set the server URL with a command line configuration.

Software That Connects GNU/Linux to Proprietary Google

Filed under
Google
  • cloudHQ – Sync Google Apps and G Suite to Cloud Accounts for Free

    cloudHQ is a free and secure software desktop client that enables you to back data up from your Google account apps e.g. Gmail and Google Drive to a variety of other Cloud service options including Amazon S3, Office 365, Egnyte, Evernote, Dropbox, and Google Drive.

    cloudHQ comes with a number of tools to improve user productivity on Gmail including the ability to track when emails are opened, snooze emails, send email campaigns, hundreds of free email templates, and much more.

  • Announcing to Google Chat from your Ansible Playbook

    We're currently migrating from our on premise HipChat instance to Google Chat (basically a nicer UI for Hangouts). Since our deployments are orchestrated by ansible playbooks we'd like to write out to changelog chat rooms whenever a deployment starts and finishes (either with a success or a failure message), I had to figure out how to write to those Google Chat rooms/conversations via the simple Webhook API.

Google releases open source reinforcement learning framework for training AI models

Filed under
Google
OSS

Reinforcement learning — an artificial intelligence (AI) technique that uses rewards (or punishments) to drive agents in the direction of specific goals — trained the systems that defeated Alpha Go world champions and mastered Valve’s Dota 2. And it’s a core part of Google subsidiary DeepMind’s deep Q-network (DQN), which can distribute learning across multiple workers in the pursuit of, for example, achieving “superhuman” performance in Atari 2600 games. The trouble is, reinforcement learning frameworks take time to master a goal, tend to be inflexible, and aren’t always stable.

That’s why Google is proposing an alternative: an open source reinforcement framework based on TensorFlow, its machine learning library. It’s available from Github starting today.

Read more

Syndicate content

More in Tux Machines

Android Leftovers

Snake your way across your Linux terminal

Welcome back to the Linux command-line toys advent calendar. If this is your first visit to the series, you might be asking yourself what a command-line toy even is. It's hard to say exactly, but my definition is anything that helps you have fun at the terminal. We've been on a roll with games over the weekend, and it was fun, so let's look at one more game today, Snake! Snake is an oldie but goodie; versions of it have been around seemingly forever. The first version I remember playing was one called Nibbles that came packaged with QBasic in the 1990s, and was probably pretty important to my understanding of what a programming language even was. Here I had the source code to a game that I could modify and just see what happens, and maybe learn something about what all of those funny little words that made up a programming language were all about. Read more

Growing Your Small Business With An Affordable OS

Your small business needs to grow, there's no doubt about that. Expansion is the name of the game when you have a one or two man company, and you're going to want to bring on at least 20 or more people to really get the cogs grinding. And if you're working on a digital interface, slowly phasing pen and paper out of the office you operate in, you're going to need plenty of people around to oil the engine and keep the tech in a usable state. Because of this, technology helps your small business grow, and can do quite a few wonders for the time and effort you invested into it. Even if you're working on a minimal budget, there's quite a few option to look into to make sure you've got just as much of a chance as the shop next door to you that seems to have a never ending stream of customers. After all, you've got to get your internal processes working perfectly first, and with a bit of technological aid, you might manage that faster than you first thought. Read more

Security: Polkit, CSP, Ansible and Router Hardening Checklist

  • Polkit CVE-2018-19788 vs. SELinux
  • Why is your site not using Content Security Policy / CSP?
    Yesterday, I had the pleasure of watching on Frikanalen the OWASP talk by Scott Helme titled "What We’ve Learned From Billions of Security Reports". I had not heard of the Content Security Policy standard nor its ability to "call home" when a browser detect a policy breach (I do not follow web page design development much these days), and found the talk very illuminating. The mechanism allow a web site owner to use HTTP headers to tell visitors web browser which sources (internal and external) are allowed to be used on the web site. Thus it become possible to enforce a "only local content" policy despite web designers urge to fetch programs from random sites on the Internet, like the one enabling the attack reported by Scott Helme earlier this year.
  • Red Hat Ansible Playbooks Password Exposure Vulnerability [CVE-2018-16859]
    CVE-2018-16859. A vulnerability in Red Hat Ansible could allow a local attacker to discover plaintext passwords on a targeted system.
  • Router Hardening Checklist