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Google

Google Pixel Slate, Android 'Smart' Watch and Google's Censorship/Ban of SuperSU (Root Access)

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Android
Google

Chrome and Google: Breaking the Web, Extension Permissions and In-Browser Games

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Google
Web
  • Google wants to change URL? Proposal.

    You may have heard about this. Google is considering an idea of changing how people interact with websites. More specifically, how people interact with URLs, the human-readable Web addresses by which we largely identify and remember websites we go to. The ripple effect around this proposal has been quite interesting, to say the least. And it got me thinking.

    One, the actual backlash against the change is more revealing than the change itself. Two, is there really any real merit in trying to make URLs somehow more meaningful and/or useful than their current form? To that end, you are reading this article.

  • You’ll Soon Have Granular Control of Chrome Extension Permissions

    Chrome extensions have been under heavy scrutiny over the couple of years due to security risks, but Google is looking to change that with upcoming granular permission control. This is a huge step forward for extension security.

    Basically, this is a similar take on Android’s granular permissions controls, just for Chrome browser extensions. The biggest problem with extensions—at least from a security standpoint—is their essentially universal ability to read, write, and change data on websites. With this upcoming feature, you’ll be able to control when and how extensions can read and write data.

  • Google’s Project Stream is Ready To Play AAA Console Games in Chrome

    Streaming full 3D games over a high-speed web connection is a fast growing trend. And with ridiculous amounts of infrastructure and remote computing power, Google is well equipped to join it.

    That’s the gist behind Project Stream, the web giant’s latest foray into the consumer market. Google will stream Assassin’s Creed Odyssey, the latest entry in Ubisoft’s long-running stab-em-up series, to Chrome browsers on desktops and laptops. Aside from a small client program, you won’t need the usual gigabytes of local storage or beefy PC hardware to play: it’s all running on Google’s remote systems. The beta test of the service will begin this Friday, October 5th, and it’ll be playable on Windows, macOS, and ChromeOS.

Linux Apps on High Resolution Chromebooks Getting A Fix

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Linux
Google

The advent of Linux apps on Chromebooks is a relatively new phenomenon that feels like its been around for a long time. If you remember, the feature has only been around for the last few versions of Chrome and only began garnering attention in May of 2018 around Google’s yearly developer event: I/O.

With that in mind, the rapid development has been impressive. It took Android far longer to shake out the major bugs and become relatively usable. Linux apps at this point are working quite well with decent file support and relatively simple setup – assuming you know your way around a Linux terminal. Heck, even if you don’t, getting a software center installed is pretty simple for most people and can give a level of comfort to users not so familiar with the terminal.

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Also: 12 Chrome Extensions for Developers and Designers

Review: Google’s Wear OS 2.0 can’t fix its obsolete smartwatch hardware

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OS
Google
Reviews

Google's major Wear OS revamp is out today, and soon it will arrive on most devices released in the past year and a half (although Ars has already spent a week with a pre-release version of the OS). In the face of relentless competition from the Apple Watch Series 4 and Samsung Galaxy Watch, Google's most obvious change in the new Wear OS is a new UI for most of the main screens. There's not much in the way of new functionality or features, but everything is laid out better.

Google hasn't done much to publicize the actual name of this release, but it identifies the update as "Wear OS 2.0" on the "About" page, so we're calling it that. Don't confuse "Wear OS 2.0" with "Android Wear 2.0," though, because the latter launched in 2017. When the name change from "Android Wear" to "Wear OS" happened, the version numbers reset. Android Wear started at "1.0" and made it all the way to "2.9;" Wear OS then started over at "1.0" and counted back up to "2.0." Continuing the old version numbers would have made things a lot easier: Google and terrible branding—name a more iconic duo.

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Project Treble

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Android
Google

Android's Project Treble is meant as a way to reduce the fragmentation in the Android ecosystem. It also makes porting Android 8 ("Oreo"—the first version to mandate Treble) more difficult, according to Fedor Tcymbal. He described the project and what it means for silicon and device vendors in a talk at Open Source Summit North America 2018 in Vancouver, Canada.

Tcymbal works for Mera, which is a software services company. It has worked with various system-on-chip (SoC) and device vendors to get Android running on their hardware. The company has done so for several Android versions along the way, but Android 8 "felt very different" because of Treble. It was "much more difficult to upgrade" to Oreo than to previous Android versions.

He put up several quotes from Google employees describing Treble (slides [PDF]). Those boil down to an acknowledgment that the changes made for Treble were extensive—and expensive. More than 300 developers worked for more than a year on Treble. It makes one wonder what could justify that amount of effort, Tcymbal said.

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Malicious Features in Chrome

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Google
Web
  • Chrome 70 Will Let Users Opt Out of the New Auto-Sign In Feature

    An upcoming Chrome option allows users to log into Google accounts without logging into the browser. The change was prompted by a backlash among users and privacy advocates.

    Chrome 69, which came out earlier this month, logs all Google users into Chrome, even if they’ve previously opted out of signing into Chrome. This did not enable Chrome’s sync feature, but some users saw it as intrusive.

  • Google Does Damage Control After Chrome Faces A lot Of Backlash For Automatic Sign In Feature In Recent Update

    The first thing that most of us noticed was the UI redesign in the latest chrome update underlying which were many small and big changes alike that were not as easy to catch the eye. One of these was the feature that would automatically sign people into Chrome when they sign into a spate Google service such as Gmail.

    Google faced a lot of criticism this past week as even security experts are calling out Google for breaching individual’s privacy and point that this is a method which involves tricking the less technically adept people into sharing or rather handing over more data to Google.

  • How to stop Chrome running in the background

    Whilst I use Firefox personally, I understand that some people like to use Chrome due to the availability of a lot more extensions. So what do you do to stop Google tracking your activity even when it’s not signed in?

A cache invalidation bug in Linux memory management

Filed under
Linux
Google
Security

This blogpost describes a way to exploit a Linux kernel bug (CVE-2018-17182) that exists since kernel version 3.16. While the bug itself is in code that is reachable even from relatively strongly sandboxed contexts, this blogpost only describes a way to exploit it in environments that use Linux kernels that haven't been configured for increased security (specifically, Ubuntu 18.04 with kernel linux-image-4.15.0-34-generic at version 4.15.0-34.37). This demonstrates how the kernel configuration can have a big impact on the difficulty of exploiting a kernel bug.

The bug report and the exploit are filed in our issue tracker as issue 1664.

Fixes for the issue are in the upstream stable releases 4.18.9, 4.14.71, 4.9.128, 4.4.157 and 3.16.58.

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More Malware-Like Behaviour From Chrome and Firefox Introduces Firefox Monitor, Other News

Filed under
Google
Moz/FF
Web
  • Now Chrome Doesn’t Delete “Google Cookies” Even If You Clear All Cookies

    Yet another privacy concern for Google Chrome users! Previously, we talked about Google’s auto-login mechanism which is hijacking our local Google Chrome data. Now, another Chrome 69 setting has come to light which is risking our freedom to remove data.

  • Introducing Firefox Monitor, Helping People Take Control After a Data Breach

    Data breaches, when information like your username and password are stolen from a website you use, are an unfortunate part of life on the internet today. It can be hard to keep track of when your information has been stolen, so we’re going to help by launching Firefox Monitor, a free service that notifies people when they’ve been part of a data breach. After testing this summer, the results and positive attention gave us the confidence we needed to know this was a feature we wanted to give to all of our users.

  • Firefox Monitor, take control of your data

    That sinking feeling. You’re reading the news and you learn about a data breach. Hackers have stolen names, addresses, passwords, survey responses from a service that you use. It seems like we’re having that sinking feeling more and more. But we don’t have to despair. While technology will never be impervious to attacks, we can make sure that we’re able to respond when we learn that our personal data and passwords are part of a breach.

  • Firefox Quantum, Beta and Nightly Affected by ‘Reap Firefox’ Crash Attack

    A particular vulnerability in the present Firefox browser has been unraveled by the security researcher and basically the creater of this bug, Sabri Haddouche in his blog post. He pointed towards a bug which brings the browser and also the operating system possibly with a ‘Reap Firefox’ attack crash. This vulnerability affects Firefox versions working under Linux, macOS and Windows.

  • $1.6 Million to Connect Unconnected Americans: Our NSF-WINS Grand Prize Winners

    After months of prototyping and judging, Mozilla and the National Science Foundation are fueling the best and brightest ideas for bringing more Americans online

    Today, Mozilla and the National Science Foundation (NSF) are announcing the grand prize winners in our Wireless Innovation for a Networked Society (NSF-WINS) Challenges — an audacious competition to connect millions of unconnected Americans.

    The grand prize winners are as novel as they are promising: An 80-foot tower in rural Appalachia that beams broadband connectivity to residents. And, an autonomous network that fits in two suitcases — and can be deployed after earthquakes and hurricanes.

Chrome's Latest

Filed under
Google
Web

NYU applies open source Google AI to diagnose lung cancer

Filed under
Google
OSS

If recent research is any indication, artificial intelligence (AI) has a bright future in medicine. Nvidia developed an AI system that can generate synthetic scans of brain cancer. Google subsidiary DeepMind has demonstrated a machine learning algorithm that can recommend treatment for more than 50 eye diseases with 94 percent accuracy. And in newly published research, New York University (NYU) showed how AI might aid in lung cancer diagnosis.

A paper today published in the journal Nature Medicine (“Classification and mutation prediction from non-small cell lung cancer histopathology images using deep learning”) describes how a team of NYU researchers retrained Google’s Inception v3, an open source convolutional neural network architected for object identification, to detect certain forms of lung cancers with 97 percent accuracy.

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Also: Google AI Tool Identifies a Tumor's Mutations From an Image

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More in Tux Machines

Linux 4.20--rc76

Well, that's more like it. This is a *tiny* rc7, just how I like it. Maybe it's because everybody is too busy prepping for the holidays, and maybe it's because we simply are doing well. Regardless, it's been a quiet week, and I hope the trend continues. The patch looks pretty small too, although it's skewed by a couple of bigger fixes (re-apply i915 workarounds after reset, and dm zoned bio completion fix). Other than that it's mainly all pretty small, and spread out (usual bulk of drivers, but some arch updates, filesystem fixes, core fixes, test updates..) Read more Also: Linux 4.20-rc7 Kernel Released - Linux 4.20 Should Be Released In Time For Christmas

Android Leftovers

1080p Linux Gaming Performance - NVIDIA 415.22 vs. Mesa 19.0-devel RADV/RadeonSI

Stemming from the recent Radeon RX 590 Linux gaming benchmarks were some requests to see more 1080p gaming benchmarks, so here's that article with the low to medium tier graphics cards from the NVIDIA GeForce and AMD Radeon line-up while using the latest graphics drivers on Ubuntu 18.10. This round of benchmarking was done with the GeForce GTX 980, GTX 1060, GTX 1070, and GTX 1070 Ti using the newest 415.22 proprietary graphics driver. On the AMD side was using the patched Linux 4.20 kernel build (for RX 590 support) paired with Mesa 19.0-devel via the Padoka PPA while testing the Radeon RX 580 and RX 590. Read more

Sparky SU 0.1.0

This tool provides Yad based front-end for su (spsu) allowing users to give a password and run graphical commands as root without needing to invoke su in a terminal emulator. It can be used as a Gksu replacement to run any application as root. Read more