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Google

How Google decides to open source its technology

Filed under
Google
OSS

Google has a solid reputation as an engineering organisation with an open source culture, with Googlers contributing a huge amount of code back to the community and projects like TensorFlow and Kubernetes making a mainstream impact.

Speaking to the press during the Google Cloud Next event in San Francisco last week, Sarah Novotny, head of open source strategy at Google Cloud Platform (GCP) and Melody Meckfessel, VP of engineering for GCP, spoke candidly about how the company decides to open source its technology and building an open culture.

"Google has a long history of engaging in open source communities," Novotny started out by saying. "We've had an open source programs office for more than 12 years and have worked with several other large companies to come into this space in a way that protects both the company and the projects and the culture of the projects."

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Chromebook Marketing Badmouths Windows, MacOS

Filed under
GNU
Linux
Google
Microsoft
Mac

Linux Apps may come to Chromebooks in Stable Channel In Version 69

Filed under
Linux
Google

We were originally hoping that Chrome OS version 68 would get Linux App support, but that wasn’t the case. Now, Chrome 69 is said to be released for the 4th September this year. (Not too long left to go) and the update has a strong chance to hit Google’s very own Chromebook first instead of the other Chromebook. This information is gleaned from several commits that suggest a review of the Crostini project will now finalise.

Without the upcoming update, Linux app support is already available on a fair amount of Chrome OS laptops that are running the Dev Channel version of the Chrome OS. The fair amount of Chrome OS laptops, which includes Google’s own Pixelbook and HP’s Chromebook x2, can potentially run Linux Apps. But, as many of these laptops are not high specification machines, they might (will) struggle to adequately run Linux Apps.

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OS Turf Wars

Filed under
GNU
Linux
Google
Microsoft
  • Build your own Chrome/Linux operating system with Chromium OS and Crostini

    Google is slowly starting to add support for running Linux applications on Chromebooks. But as I discovered when I tested Linux apps on the Acer Chromebook Tab 10 recently, it’s still a work in progress. The feature also isn’t available for all Chrome OS computers yet.

    That could change in the not-too-distant future. Right now you need to be running Chrome OS in the developer channel in order to enable Linux app support. There are signs that Linux app support could hit the Chrome OS beta channel this week, and it could graduate to the stable channel by the time Chrome OS 69 is released later this year.

  • Germans swing another putsch against Linux [Ed: This isn't a technical decision. It cannot be technical. I reckon some politicians/suits had too many dinners with Microsoft and maybe bribes too (like the Munich saga)]

    As initially reported by Heise, the state's tax authority has 13,000 workstations running OpenSuse -- which it adopted in 2006 in a well-received migration from Solaris -- that it now wants to migrate to a "current version" of Windows, presumably Windows 10.

  • With DaaS Windows coming, say goodbye to your PC as you know it

    Now Microsoft, which helped lead that revolution, is trying to return us to that old, centralized control model.

    Forget that noise. If Microsoft continues on this course, soon your only real choices if you really want a “desktop” operating system will be Linux and macOS. Oh, you’ll still have “Windows.” But Windows as your “personal” desktop? It will be history.

Google: The Data Transfer Project, Fuchsia, Cirq, Chrome 69

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Google
  • The Data Transfer Project and the Hammer

    Got that? There are actually two conversions each time data passes back or forth: first from the proprietary API of Company A into the Data Model for that type of information, and then from the Data Model to the proprietary API of Company B. With the standards approach, Company A simply sends its data to Company B directly without the need for conversion even once, because both companies create and store data using the same format.

     

    Stated another way, using adapters is a band aid approach that allows proprietary vendors to continue to use proprietary technology to silo your data, while providing just enough mobility to users to permit them to tolerate the continuation of life as we know it and compliance with evolving regulations, such as the GDPR.

     

    In short, using an open source hammer treats the user as a nail. Using open standards would turn the user into a hammer, empowering her to use whatever vendor she wishes, and putting the maximum incentive on all vendors to compete on services, features and performance to earn the user’s continued business.

     

    I think we can all agree that users would rather be the hammer. We’ve all been the nail for far too long, and all it’s given us is headaches.

     

  • What is Fuchsia, and why should you care?

    But an operating system needs more than a name. And without Google telling us anything about its new project, we're left to piece together all the breadcrumbs the internet can find. Here is what we know so far.

  • Google Cirq: a Python Open Source Library for Quantum Computing

    Cirq aims to make it easier to write, manipulate, and optimize quantum algorithms for noisy intermediate scale quantum (NISQ) computers. Cirq also enables the execution of those programs on a local simulator and is designed to support future quantum hardware and quantum cloud processors.

    Noisy intermediate scale quantum computers will be the first quantum computers that will become available in the near future and that have been announced by several companies, including Microsoft, Google, IBM, Intel, and others. Comprised of 50–100 qubits, NISQ computers aim to allows researchers to demonstrate quantum supremacy, although their usefulness will be limited by quantum gates noise and thus by the efficiency of error correction algorithms that will be designed.

  • Linux Apps on Chromebooks Could Hit Stable In Chrome 69

    It’s been a bit since we’ve talked about Linux apps on Chromebooks, but that doesn’t mean development has stopped. Actually, progress has been constantly moving forward with small tweaks and changes happening almost daily. The big changes, however, haven’t been as rapid-fire since I/O back in May, so news surrounding the Crostini project has been a bit quieter overall.

Google moves AndroidX to the Android Open Source Project

Filed under
Android
Google
OSS

Google is attempting to provide more transparency to developers by moving AndroidX, which was previously called the Android Support Library, to the public Android Open Source Project (AOSP). This move means that primary feature development and bug fixes will be completed in the open and changes will be visible.

AndroidX originally started off as a small set of libraries wtih the intent to provide backwards compatibility for new Android platform APIs, and as a result, its development was strictly tied to the platform. All work was done in internal Google branches and then pushed to the AOSP.

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Chromebooks/Chromecast Programs

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Google
  • The Best Photo Editors for Chromebooks

    One of the biggest question we see about Chromebooks is “can they run Photoshop?” The answer to that is no—at least not the full version you’ll find on other platforms. But that doesn’t mean they can’t do photo editing.

    And that’s really the key here: knowing when you need Photoshop versus when you just need something to edit photos. There are some powerful tools available for Chromebooks—perhaps not quite as powerful as Photoshop, but they can get pretty dang close for most uses.

  • How To Connect Your Chromecast To VLC?

Google 'Cloudwashing' (Other Buzzwords Also) and Kubernetes

Filed under
Server
Google

Google Promotes 'Security' and Lock-in

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Google
  • The Key to Trust

    As the principal inventor behind both the Security Key and U2F protocol, we are true supporters of open standards. To realize our mission of making secure login ubiquitous, we designed the original Security Key, and provided the majority of the open source code and test tools for FIDO U2F and the latest version of the standard, FIDO2, which offers a passwordless experience.

  • Google takes on Yubico and builds its own hardware security keys

    Google today announced it is launching its own hardware security keys for two-factor authentication. These so-called Titan Security Keys will go up against similar keys from companies like Yubico, which Google has long championed as the de facto standard for hardware-based two-factor authentication for Gmail and other services.

  • Google Launches ‘Titan Security Key’ To Boost Your Online Security

    Google has launched the public version of the security key used to protect its 85,000 employees from phishing and other cyber attacks during internal testing. Named Titan, it falls under the category of physical security keys that are known to provide better protection than other forms of 2-step verification including OTPs.

  • Connect Google Cloud Identity with Linux® [Ed: Anything “aaS” means surveillance]

    Unfortunately, Google’s view of their IDaaS platform doesn’t include systems operating outside of GCP. So, with respect to this blog post, the concept of connecting Google Cloud Identity with Linux machines hosted at AWS, Azure, on-prem, or anywhere else that is outside of Google’s ecosystem simply doesn’t work with Google Cloud Identity alone.

  • Cloud Services Platform: bringing the best of the cloud to you

Security Updates and Google Warnings

Filed under
Google
Security
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Good Support For Wayland Remote Desktop Handling On Track For KDE Plasma 5.15

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