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Google launches i.MX8M dev board with Edge TPU AI chip

Filed under
Google
Hardware

Google has launched a sandwich-style, $150 “Coral Dev Board” with an RPi-like 40-pin header that runs Linux on an i.MX8M with an Edge TPU chip for accelerating TensorFlow Lite. The USB stick version sells for $75.

Google unveiled its embedded oriented Edge TPU version of its Tensor Processing Unit AI chip in July. More details quickly followed on its Linux-driven Edge TPU dev kit and USB stick version of the Edge TPU chip called the Edge TPU Accelerator. Now Mouser has opened pre-orders for both devices selling for $150 and $75, respectively, with shipments expected soon.

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Brave and Mozilla Firefox

Filed under
Google
Moz/FF
Web
  • Why I chose Brave as my Chrome browser replacement

     

    This year, I’m pretty sure I’ve found the ideal Chrome alternative in the Brave browser. If your reasons for sticking with Chrome have been (a) extensions, (Cool compatibility, (c) syncing across devices, or (d, unlikely) speed, Brave checks all of those boxes. What’s more, it’s just one of a growing number of really good options that aren’t made by Google.

  • Firefox Nightly: These Weeks in Firefox: Issue 54

    Firefox Account is experimenting with putting an avatar next to the hamburger menu. It will give users visibility on their account, sync status as well as links to manage the account. Targeting landing & beta uplift this week!

  • QMO: DevEdition 66 Beta 14 Friday, March 8th

    We are happy to let you know that Friday, March 8th, we are organizing DevEdition 66 Beta 14 Testday. We’ll be focusing our testing on: Firefox Screenshots, Search, Build installation & uninstallation.

    Check out the detailed instructions via this etherpad.

  • Mozilla Open Policy & Advocacy Blog: Indian government allows expanded private sector use of Aadhaar through ordinance (but still no movement on data protection law)

    The Court had placed fundamental limits to the otherwise ubiquitous use of Aadhaar, India’s biometric ID system, including the requirement of an authorizing law for any private sector use. While the ordinance purports to provide this legal backing, its broad scope could dilute both the letter and intent of the judgment. As per the ordinance, companies will now be able to authenticate using Aadhaar as long as the Unique Identification Authority of India (UIDAI) is satisfied that “certain standards of privacy and security” are met. These standards remain undefined, and especially in the absence of a data protection law, this raises serious concerns.

    The swift movement to foster expanded use of Aadhaar is in stark contrast to the lack of progress on advancing a data protection bill that would safeguard the rights of Indians whose data is implicated in this system. Aadhaar continues to be effectively mandatory for a vast majority of Indian residents, given its requirement for the payment of income tax and various government welfare schemes. Mozilla has repeatedly warned of the dangers of a centralized database of biometric information and authentication logs.

Google/FOSS: Openwashing, F-Droid, Google Summer of Code, Flutter and the Fight Over Java APIs

Filed under
Google
OSS
  • Google's new .dev domain opens to all
  • Google open-sources Cloud IoT Device SDK, a collection of libraries for embedded microcontroller-class devices
  • More Languages to the F-Droid Planet?

    You may know about Planet F-Droid, a feed aggregator that aims to collect the blogs of many free Android projects in one place. Currently all of the registered blogs are written in English (as is this post, so if you know someone who might be concerned by the matter below and is not able to understand English, please feel free to translate for them).

  • Gearing Up For Google Summer of Code

    The mentoring organizations for the GSoC 2019 have been announced. This will be the 15th edition of Google's program to match university students to open source organizations for three month's worth of online programming experience over the summer break.

    GSoc is popular both with university students, who can earn a stipend from Google while making a worthwhile contribution to an open source projects, and to open source organizations which gain valuable assistance from students who are eager to do well and have something worthwhile to add to their resumes.

  • Google launches Flutter 1.2 and Dart DevTools, a web-based suite of programming tools

    Flutter is one of the newest additions to the arsenal for app developers. It’s a UI framework for building beautiful, fluid, and interactive cross-platform native apps on iOS and Android using the Dart language. The first stable release of the cross-platform development toolkit was released just three months ago. Today, Google announced the first feature updated for Flutter, Flutter 1.2, at Mobile World Congress, along with a new web-based suite of programming tools called Dart DevTools.

  • US Supremes urged by pretty much everyone in software dev to probe Oracle's 'disastrous' Java API copyright win

    The US Supreme Court has been urged to hear Google out in its long-running copyright battle with Oracle over the search giant’s use of Java technology in Android.

    Some 14 amicus briefs have been filed with the top court in support of Google, with Microsoft, Red Hat and Mozilla, along with the Python Software Foundation, Developers Alliance, and the EFF, backing the web titan against database-slinger Oracle.

    They say an earlier court ruling in Oracle's favor on the fair use of Java APIs – as it stands – sets a dangerous precedent that breaks long-standing and well-understood rules on software development, risks confusing the community, and will damage innovation.

    Oracle sued Google in 2010 after the database goliath acquired Sun Microsystems and with it the rights to Java. Big Red then contested Google’s use of Java APIs in its Android mobile operating system.

7 fresh Chromebook features to keep an eye on

Filed under
GNU
Linux
Google

Speaking of apps, Linux apps on Chromebooks still feel like a bit of a tacked-on addition — a useful way to expand what your Chromebook can do, to be sure, but also more of an awkward appendage than a true native part of the operating system. Google's got several fixes in the works that should help with this and make Linux apps seem more at home in the Chrome OS environment.

First, it'll soon be easier to access files while using a Linux app on your Chromebook. Right now, Linux apps are able to access only a specific area of your device's storage that's designated explicitly for Linux app use. That's part of how Google maintains Chrome OS's unusual security setup and keeps the main operating system isolated from these potentially compromising local programs, but it also makes it pretty tricky to open files or find what you need while using a Linux app — since you basically have to copy or move things around manually ahead of time in order to do that.

Soon, you'll be able to easily share entire folders with the Linux part of your system — possibly as early as the Chrome OS 73 release, which is slated to arrive in mid-March.

Beyond that, engineers are working on a way to let Linux apps access your Google Drive storage, your Android-app-related files, and also files from a USB storage device, should you be so inspired. All of that could also show up broadly as soon as the Chrome OS 73 release, in a matter of weeks.

And finally, in Chrome OS 74, in late April, we could see the long-awaited addition of audio playback support for Linux apps — which would open the door to a level of advanced audio editing work not currently possible on Chromebooks.

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'Chromisation' of GNU/Linux

Filed under
GNU
Linux
Google
Microsoft
  • Google Chrome/Chromium Begins Landing POWER PPC64LE Patches

    Raptor Computing Systems spent a lot of time last year working on Chrome's PPC64LE support to enable Google's web browser to run on the latest IBM POWER processors. Google was sitting on these patches without any action for months but finally they are beginning to be accepted upstream. 

    It's been a bit odd with the PPC64LE support for Chrome/Chromium taking so long with Google being a founding member of the OpenPOWER Foundation and also reportedly using some POWER9 CPUs within their data centers. But after this long and drawn out process, progress is finally being made on getting Raptor's patches upstreamed. 

  • Chrome OS 74 adds support for backing up the Linux container

    Chrome OS version 74 has been reported on in the past, but if you're running this version then you can now back up and restore the Linux container it uses.

  • Chrome OS 74 brings much-needed audio support to Linux apps

    Spotted in the most recent Dev builds by About Chromebooks, the virtual machine responsible for Chrome OS’s Linux apps is now able to pass audio to Chrome OS proper. Under the hood, this is handled by PulseAudio, a well-known Linux sound system which is capable of transmitting audio data over a network.

    If you’ve never installed Linux apps support before on your Chromebook, it should work after initial install from the newest Chrome OS 74 Dev build. Otherwise, the Chromium team has provided some simple instructions of commands to be run to enable audio.

  • Windows 10 Updates Are Still A Confusing Mess, And This One Image Proves It

    A new way of looking at how Windows 10 Updates behave may just melt your brain.

    [...]

    I'll leave you with this webcomic by Brandon Bradshaw about how Linux updates your PC...

Google Summer of Code 2019

Filed under
KDE
Google

The KDE Community is happy to announce that we have been selected to participate in Google Summer of Code. This will be our our 14th year of mentoring students.

Attention students: If you are a student who would like to work with KDE this summer you can apply to SoC, find more info on the KDE GSoC wiki page. Please note that your project proposal will need to link to some commits to the KDE codebase, so get started now fixing some bugs! If you are wondering what you can work on, also check out our ideas page.

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Go 1.12 is released

Filed under
Development
Google

Today the Go team is happy to announce the release of Go 1.12. You can get it from the download page.

For details about the changes in Go 1.12, see the Go 1.12 release notes.

Some of the highlights include opt-in support for TLS 1.3, improved modules support (in preparation for being the default in Go 1.13), support for windows/arm, and improved macOS & iOS forwards compatibility.

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Phoronix: Golang 1.12 Released With Opt-In TLS 1.3, Better Modules Support & Performance Work

LWN: Go 1.12 released

Latest in GNU/Linux on Chromebooks

Filed under
GNU
Linux
Google
  • Audio playback for Linux on Chromebooks arrives in latest Chrome OS 74 Dev Channel release

    Google released version 74.0.3713.0 to the Chrome OS 74 Dev Channel on Monday and there are over 500 mentions of “Crostini”, the project that brought Linux support to Chromebooks. I’m still poring through the changelog, but I immediately noticed a mention of audio support. I tested it, and after a few commands in the Terminal as well as a few reboots, I got it to work.

  • This Feature Could Make Chromebook Tablet Mode Much Smoother, And You Could Help Make It Happen!

    It is no secret that one of the big struggles right now for Chrome OS, Chromebooks, detachables, and tablets is overview and split-screen mode. While the majority of the OS can run smooth on various chipsets, we see severely crippled performance across the board when it comes to both the overview mode and split-screen views. We’ve detailed a bit about this issue and the fixes being worked on, but the fixes outlined in that article are really more about the overview mode in both desktop and tablet mode.

Google: GNU/Linux Under Chrome OS, Foxxum Launches Linux AOSP UI

Filed under
OS
Android
GNU
Linux
Google
  • Chrome OS 74 will enable audio for Linux apps

    You can install and run Linux apps on most recent Chromebooks thanks to Google’s Crostini software. That makes Chromebooks feel a lot more like “real” laptops, since you can now run desktop software like GIMP or LibreOffice. But there are a few things Linux apps still can’t do.

    They don’t support hardware-accelerated graphics. And they don’t support audio. But that second restriction looks like it’s on its way out.

  • Foxxum launches Linux AOSP UI

    China-based OEM Asano’s products are sold in more than 110 countries and as part of the new deal, Asano will integrate the Foxxum app store on all sold devices. It will feature global and local apps and custom-made interface and designs for all brands. The app store will be available on Linux and AOSP OS based devices from beginning of 2019 to deliver what the companies says will be ‘competitive’, next generation smart TV user experiences.

    “Working with Foxxum’s app store will allow us to further enhance our products,” remarked Asano CEO He Xing. “The company’s know-how, speed and professionalism fits our high-quality standards and most importantly will satisfy our customer’s demands.”

GAFAM: Microsoft's Misappropriation of "Linux", Google 'Invents' Linux Support for Sound, Apple Shuns GNU/Linux

Filed under
Google
Microsoft
Mac
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More in Tux Machines

OSS: Huawei and "GNU's Not Unix."

  • Huawei Could Rebuild Trust in Their Products Through Open Source

    Open source code for Huawei equipment would allow nations, companies, and individuals alike to verify that the code is free of malware, and that it contains no obvious security problems.

    Reproducible builds allow everyone to be reassured that the code running on the network devices matches the open source code that is reviewed by the public. This removes another layer of distrust.

    And if you want to protect against the advent of Chinese “malicious updates” you can use multi-party key signature schemes for firmware updates, to ensure that updates are approved by the government/company before they are rolled out.

  • The WIRED Guide to Open Source Software

    The open source software movement grew out of the related, but separate, "free software" movement. In 1983, Richard Stallman, at the time a programmer at the MIT Artificial Intelligence Laboratory, said he would create a free alternative to the Unix operating system, then owned by AT&T; Stallman dubbed his alternative GNU, a recursive acronym for "GNU's Not Unix."

    For Stallman, the idea of "free" software was about more than giving software away. It was about ensuring that users were free to use software as they saw fit, free to study its source code, free to modify it for their own purposes, and free to share it with others. Stallman released his code under a license known as the GNU Public License, or GPL, which guarantees users those four software freedoms. The GPL is a "viral" license, meaning that anyone who creates software based on code licensed under the GPL must also release that derivative code under a GPL license.

GNOME 3.34 Desktop Environment Development Kicks Off with First Snapshot

GNOME 3.34 will be the next major release of the popular free and open-source desktop environment for Linux-based operating systems, expected to hit the streets later this year on September 11th. During its entire development cycle, GNOME 3.34 will be developed under the GNOME 3.33.x umbrella. Work on the GNOME 3.34 desktop environment begun a few weeks ago, after the launch of the GNOME 3.32 "Taipei" desktop environment, which is already the default desktop environment of the recently released Ubuntu 19.04 (Disco Dingo) operating system and other GNU/Linux distributions. Read more

The mysterious history of the MIT License

I say "seemingly straightforward" because the MIT License is one of the most popular licenses used by open source software. The MIT License, Apache License, and BSD license are the main permissive licenses, a term that contrasts with reciprocal licenses like the GPL, which require source code to be made available when software is redistributed. Given its popularity, you'd think the license's inception would be well-documented. I found various clues that added up to a date in the late 1980s but nothing definitive. However, Keith Packard and Jim Gettys jumped on the thread to offer first-hand accounts of the license's creation. In addition to providing early examples of the license, their help also gave me the context to better understand how the license evolved over time. Read more

BSD: A Look at NomadBSD and Audiocasts About BSDs and ZFS

  • NomadBSD, a BSD for the Road
    As regular It’s FOSS readers should know, I like diving into the world of BSDs. Recently, I came across an interesting BSD that is designed to live on a thumb drive. Let’s take a look at NomadBSD. [...] This German BSD comes with an OpenBox-based desktop with the Plank application dock. NomadBSD makes use of the DSB project. DSB stands for “Desktop Suite (for) (Free)BSD” and consists of a collection of programs designed to create a simple and working environment without needing a ton of dependencies to use one tool. DSB is created by Marcel Kaiser one of the lead devs of NomadBSD. Just like the original BSD projects, you can contact the NomadBSD developers via a mailing list.
  • Fun with funlinkat() | BSD Now 295
    Introducing funlinkat(), an OpenBSD Router with AT&T U-Verse, using NetBSD on a raspberry pi, ZFS encryption is still under development, Rump kernel servers and clients tutorial, Snort on OpenBSD 6.4, and more.
  • Snapshot Sanity | TechSNAP 402
    We continue our take on ZFS as Jim and Wes dive in to snapshots, replication, and the magic on copy on write. Plus some handy tools to manage your snapshots, rsync war stories, and more!