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Google

“Fuchsia”

Filed under
OS
Google
OSS

Death of Adobe Trash (Flash)

Filed under
Google
Web
  • Chrome to make Flash mostly-dead in early December [Ed: but do we replace one blob with another? (Chrome is proprietary)]

    Google yesterday set an early December deadline for purging most Flash content from its Chrome browser, adding that it will take an interim step next month when it stops rendering Flash-based page analytics.

    In a post to a company blog, Anthony LaForge, a technical program manager on the Chrome team, said the browser would refuse to display virtually all Flash content starting with version 55, which is scheduled for release the week of Dec. 5.

    Previously, Google had used a broader deadline of this year's fourth quarter for quashing all Flash content except for that produced by a select list of 10 sites, including Amazon, Facebook and YouTube.

  • Google Chrome's plan to kill Flash kicks into high gear

    Google is getting serious about ending the reign of Adobe Flash on the web.

    The company recently detailed a timeline for bringing Flash on Chrome to an end—kind of. Even in these late stages of Flash’s life on the web you still can’t kill it off entirely. Instead, Google says it will “de-emphasize” Flash to the point where it’s almost never used except when absolutely necessary.

  • HTML5 Wins: Google Chrome Is Officially Killing Flash Next Month

    With an aim to bring security, better battery life, and faster load times, Google is de-emphasizing Flash next month. After this change in Chrome 53, the behind-the-scenes Flash will be blocked in favor of HTML5. Later, with Chrome 55, HTML5 will be made the default choice while loading a web page.

The best Chromebook you can buy

Filed under
GNU
Linux
Google
Reviews

If you’re looking for a cheap computer, the first thing you should do is check out just how much you can get with a Chromebook.

Chromebooks are increasingly looking like the perfect laptops for a whole lot of people. Sure, they don’t have the wide desktop app ecosystem that Mac and Windows laptops have. But ask yourself how many of those apps you actually use each day, and of those, how many you actually need. Could you trade Outlook for outlook.com? Would you be fine in Google Docs instead of Office? (And if not, would your answer change if it meant saving several hundred dollars?)

Most of our time is spent online, and Chromebooks stick to the basics, offering just enough power to do that. The best of them should let you browse the web without problem and manage to impress you with how nice they are for the price.

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Valve is open-sourcing HTC Vive's room-scale tracking tech

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Google
OSS

Games for GNU/Linux

Filed under
Google
  • RAD Game's New Oodle Data Compression Beats Open-Source Alternatives

    The latest work on RAD Game Tools' Oodle data compression with new compression codecs have it handily beating the open-source alternatives.

    There's been much interest in recent times around the open-source Google Brotli project as well as Zstd and others, but the latest work done by RAD Game Tools to their commercial and proprietary compression tech is now putting the open-source lossless compression alternatives further behind.

  • First Release!!! [Ed: Voxel Quest Open Sourced]

    It is the moment you have all been waiting for!...ish. I am sticking one toe in the water and putting out a very, very unpolished release of the very first version of the engine (the isometric engine, which differs from what I previously said I would release first, due to demand). Other versions are to follow. It was a fair amount of work to prep just this release, as unpolished as it is. And there are many things wrong, which I am mostly aware of (see the README.md). As noted, the point was not to make a perfect release, the point was to get the code in your hands as fast as possible (and I am sorry it has taken this long for me to get it out!).

  • Total War: WARHAMMER is still coming to Linux, being ported by Feral Interactive

    We already knew that Total War: WARHAMMER was coming to Linux, but we didn’t know when as it seemed like it was forgotten about. Now we know it’s being ported by Feral Interactive!

    This is good news, as I’ve been pretty happy with Feral’s porting work and their support of their products has been top notch. Pleased to see them get more porting work to continue pushing our platform.

    Hopefully I will be able to do my usual thing of giving it a run over before release, if not, I will try to after release.

Chromebooks, Chrome, Android, and Google

Filed under
Android
Google

Google beefs Linux up kernel defenses in Android

Filed under
Android
Linux
Google

Future versions of Android will be more resilient to exploits thanks to developers' efforts to integrate the latest Linux kernel defenses into the operating system.

Android's security model relies heavily on the Linux kernel that sits at its core. As such, Android developers have always been interested in adding new security features that are intended to prevent potentially malicious code from reaching the kernel, which is the most privileged area of the operating system.

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More in Tux Machines

Mark McIntyre: How Do You Fedora?

Mark McIntyre is a geek by birth and Linux by choice. “I started coding at the early age of 13 learning BASIC on my own and finding the excitement of programming which led me down a path of becoming a professional coder,” he says. McIntyre and his niece are big fans of pizza. “My niece and I started a quest last fall to try as many of the pizza joints in Knoxville. You can read about our progress at https://knox-pizza-quest.blogspot.com/” Mark is also an amateur photographer and publishes his images on Flickr. Read more

today's leftovers

  • [LabPlot] Improved data fitting in 2.5
    Until now, the fit parameters could in principle take any values allowed by the fit model, which would lead to a reasonable description of the data. However, sometimes the realistic regions for the parameters are known in advance and it is desirable to set some mathematical constrains on them. LabPlot provides now the possibility to define lower and/or upper bounds for the fit parameters and to limit the internal fit algorithm to these regions only.
  • [GNOME] Maps Towards 3.28
    Some work has been done since the release of 3.26 in September. On the visual side we have adapted the routing sidebar to use a similar styling as is used in Files (Nautilus) and the GTK+ filechooser.
  • MX 17 Beta 2
  • MiniDebconf in Toulouse
    I attended the MiniDebconf in Toulouse, which was hosted in the larger Capitole du Libre, a free software event with talks, presentation of associations, and a keysigning party. I didn't expect the event to be that big, and I was very impressed by its organization. Cheers to all the volunteers, it has been an amazing week-end!
  • DebConf Videoteam sprint report - day 0
    First day of the videoteam autumn sprint! Well, I say first day, but in reality it's more day 0. Even though most of us have arrived in Cambridge already, we are still missing a few people. Last year we decided to sprint in Paris because most of our video gear is stocked there. This year, we instead chose to sprint a few days before the Cambridge Mini-Debconf to help record the conference afterwards.
  • Libre Computer Board Launches Another Allwinner/Mali ARM SBC
    The Tritium is a new ARM single board computer from the Libre Computer Board project. Earlier this year the first Libre Computer Board launched as the Le Potato for trying to be a libre and free software minded ARM SBC. That board offered better specs than the Raspberry Pi 3 and aimed to be "open" though not fully due to the ARM Mali graphics not being open.
  • FOSDEM 2018 Will Be Hosting A Wayland / Mesa / Mir / X.Org Developer Room
    This year at the FOSDEM open-source/Linux event in Brussels there wasn't the usual "X.Org dev room" as it's long been referred to, but for 2018, Luc Verhaegen is stepping back up to the plate and organizing this mini graphics/X.Org developer event within FOSDEM.
  • The Social Network™ releases its data networking code
    Facebook has sent another shiver running up Cisco's spine, by releasing the code it uses for packet routing. Open/R, its now-open source routing platform, runs Facebook's backbone and data centre networks. The Social Network™ first promised to release the platform in May 2017. In the post that announced the release, Facebook said it began developing Open/R for its Terragraph wireless system, but since applied it to its global fibre network, adding: “we are even starting to roll it out into our data center fabrics, running inside FBOSS and on our Open Compute Project networking hardware like Wedge 100.”
  • Intel Icelake Support Added To LLVM Clang
    Initial support for Intel's Icelake microarchitecture that's a follow-on to Cannonlake has been added to the LLVM/Clang compiler stack. Last week came the Icelake patch to GCC and now Clang has landed its initial Icelake enablement too.
  • Microsoft's Surface Book 2 has a power problem
     

    Microsoft’s Surface Book 2 has a power problem. When operating at peak performance, it may draw more power than its stock charger or Surface Dock can handle. What we’ve discovered after talking to Microsoft is that it’s not a bug—it’s a feature.

Kernel: Linux 4.15 and Intel

  • The Big Changes So Far For The Linux 4.15 Kernel - Half Million New Lines Of Code So Far
    We are now through week one of two for the merge window of the Linux 4.15 kernel. If you are behind on your Phoronix reading with the many feature recaps provided this week of the different pull requests, here's a quick recap of the changes so far to be found with Linux 4.15:
  • Intel 2017Q3 Graphics Stack Recipe Released
    Intel's Open-Source Technology Center has put out their quarterly Linux graphics driver stack upgrade in what they are calling the latest recipe. As is the case with the open-source graphics drivers just being one centralized, universal component to be easily installed everywhere, their graphics stack recipe is just the picked versions of all the source components making up their driver.
  • Intel Ironlake Receives Patches For RC6 Power Savings
    Intel Ironlake "Gen 5" graphics have been around for seven years now since being found in Clarkdale and Arrandale processors while finally now the patches are all worked out for enabling RC6 power-savings support under Linux.

Red Hat: OpenStack and Financial News