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Google

Google Pixel C Review: Android's Not Ready For a Tablet This Good

Filed under
Android
Google
Reviews

With the Pixel C, Google imagines a tablet as more than just a portable window into the internet. These things have to be good for more than endless Candy Crush and Netflix, right?

The current thinking is tablets needs to evolve, and so Google, like its rivals, has created its own, kinda-sorta work tablet, complete with keyboard accessory. Although I did manage to get work done on this thing, the hefty price didn’t justify the minimal convenience.

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Google is done selling the Nexus 6

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Android
Google

Google has said a quiet goodbye to the Nexus 6: as of today, you're no longer able to buy it from the Play Store. The decision appears to mark the end of the road for the 6-inch handset now that both the Nexus 5X and its successor, the Nexus 6P, are up for sale. If you're still itching to get your hands on one — though we can't think of a reason you'd want to — Amazon is still selling a 32GB version for $349.99. Google was not immediately available for comment on whether the phone has been permanently discontinued.

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Google To Launch Android One v2.0 In India On December 16th?

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Android
Google

Sources also say that Google plans to launch a new Android One handset in partnership with an India-based smartphone manufacturer Lava. The phone is expected to cost less than Rs. 4,000, and Android 6.0 Marshmallow will almost certainly going to come pre-installed on that handset. As rumored recently, Sundar Pichai is also expected to give more control to companies which manufacture Android One devices, like Lava for example, which should make it easier for manufacturers. It is possible that there’s more to this event than Android One, but this is all the info we have at the moment. As a side note, Google has launched Android One project in India back in 2014, and up to today, Android One devices didn’t exactly meet expectations, let’s see what’s Google’s next step.

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Android Headliner: What Google Still Needs To Do To Win Over India

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Android
Google

China is still the largest smartphone market in the world. Chinese smartphone market has been growing at an incredible pace for years, and this country is actually home to a ton of smartphone manufacturing companies. Huawei, ZTE, Meizu, Xiaomi, Oppo and OnePlus might be some of the best known China-based smartphone manufacturing companies, but there are tons of additional companies active over there, companies you probably never heard of. That being said, India is the second-biggest smartphone market in the world, and judging by its growth-rate, it might even catch up to China at some point.

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Google releases Cloud Vision API with demo for Pi-based robot

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Linux
Google

Google released a preview of its Cloud Vision API for tasks like identifying objects and faces, plus a Linux demo that runs on a Raspberry Pi-based robot.

Some of the image analysis wizardry used by Google services, such as Google Photos, is now available to developers. Google is offering a free limited preview of its Google Cloud Vision API, which is available as an “easy to use” REST API, says the company. Google also released demo code using the API that turns the Raspberry Pi-based Dexter Industries GoPiGo robot or any other camera-enabled robot based on the Pi into an image recognition and analysis bot.

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Browsers (Mozilla, Google)

Filed under
Google
Moz/FF
Web

Guide to Chromebook and Google account privacy settings for students

Filed under
Linux
Google

I love the idea behind Chromebooks, but because of the privacy implications of using them, I just admire them from a distance.

However, because of their cheap price and lower cost of maintenance, they’ve been very popular with educational institutions. The problem, is most people are either not aware or don’t care about the privacy implications of using those light and cheap notebooks or other devices running Chrome OS.

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Google killing Chrome for 32-bit Linux

Filed under
GNU
Linux
Google
  • Google killing Chrome for 32-bit Linux

    If you live in the web browser, using a Linux-based operating system makes a lot of sense. By combining say, Ubuntu and Google Chrome, you can have a very secure and easy-to-use platform running the world's best web browser. A bloated and heavy Windows 10, for instance, could be unnecessary.

  • Google ends 32-bit Linux support for Chrome

    The first signs of the end of 32bit are on the wall - starting with Linux. I wonder how long Google will continue to support 32bit Chrome on Windows. For some strange reason, Microsoft is still selling 32bit Windows 10.

  • Google Decides to End Support for Google Chrome on 32-bit Linux OSes

    The brief announcement was made an hour ago by Dirk Pranke on the Chromium-dev group, and it informs users of Ubuntu and Debian GNU/Linux distributions that starting with March 2016, the Google Chrome web browser will no longer be available for 32-bit hardware platforms.

Mozilla: we’re not getting money from Google any more but we’re doing fine

Filed under
Google
Moz/FF

For many years, Firefox developer Mozilla generated substantial income from a sponsorship deal with Google; the search and advertising firm paid Mozilla in return for Firefox making Google its default search engine. That deal was ended last year, with Firefox defaulting to Yahoo in the US, Yandex in Russia, and Baidu in China.

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Google Kubernetes Is an Open-Source Software Hit

Filed under
Google
OSS

Google Inc. has an open-source software hit on its hands.

Google has capitalized on the growing popularity of so-called containers, which are standardized building blocks of code that easily can be moved around the Internet and across a broad range of devices. In June 2014, as containers were taking off in the world of software development, Google open sourced Kubernetes, its technology for managing clusters of containers. Since then, Google has captured about 80% of the market for cluster managers, according to consulting firm Cloud Technology Partners Inc.

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More in Tux Machines

Parental Controls for Linux Unleashed

For years, one of the overlooked areas for the Linux desktop was access to “effective” parental controls. Back in 2003, I remember the now defunct Linspire (then known as Lindows) offered a proprietary option called SurfSafe. Surprisingly, at least back then, the product worked very well in providing accurate content filtering capabilities; something that was not,in fact, available and easy-to-use at that time. Years later, an open-source alternative was released to the greater Linux community known as GNOME Nanny. Fantastic in terms of usage control, its web content web filter was laughably terrible. As expected, crowd-sourcing a filtering list isn’t a great solution. And like SurfSafe, the project is now defunct. Read more

Chapeau 24 Cancellara - Same same but different

Fedora plus Moka icons plus some extra software, mainly coming from proprietary sources. I guess that's the best way to describe Chapeau. But then, what separates one distro from another if not a collection of decorations, as software is essentially the same, apart from a very small number of standalone distributions trying to develop their own identity with their own desktop environments and app stack, re: elementary or Solus + Budgie? Except they struggle, too. Chapeau 24 is a nice effort to make Fedora friendlier, but then it does not achieve the needed result without pain. The biggest issues included a botched smartphone support. Samba woes and the horrible bootloader bug. Other than that, it behaved more or less the same way as the parent distro. Then again, why bother if you can pimp up Fedora without any loss of functionality? I do like Chapeau Cancellara, but I cannot ignore the fact Fedora does the same with fewer problems. All in all, it's a welcome effort, but it needs more polish. It does not quite capture the heart the way Fuduntu did. And with some issues looming high above the distro, the grade can only be about 6/10. Most importantly, the bootloader setup must be flawless, and there's not excuse for small app errors that we've seen. We know it can do more. Anyhow, if you're not keen on any self-service round Fedora, this could be a good test bed for your games. A moderately worthy if somewhat risky and flawed experience. Read more

Mofo Linux: The Raw Materials for Security

The developers of Mofo Linux talk a good game. From the name’s origin in abusive street slang to its self-description on the home page as “Linux designed to defeat state censorship and surveillance,” Mofo presents itself as a champion of security and privacy. Nor is the claim unjustified. However, rather than putting security and privacy into the hands of ordinary users, Mofo simply presents the tools and leaves users to figure them out with a minimum of help. The result is a promising distribution that with only slightly more work, could be a leading one. Just possibly, though, this approach is a deliberate tactic, and not the carelessness it appears. Based on Ubuntu, the current release of Mofo offers nothing different in the way of productivity tools. It uses Unity for a desktop, and its applications are the standard GNOME ones. In fact, Mofo shows such little interest in such matters that it does not bother to change the title bar in the installer from Ubuntu. Read more

Happily Announcing Mageia 5.1

As we’re getting closer to the end of the year, Mageia has a present for you! We are very pleased to announce the release of Mageia 5.1! This release – like Mageia 4.1 was in its time – is a respin of the Mageia 5 installation and Live ISO images, based on the Mageia 5 repository and incorporating all updates to allow for an up to date installation without the need to install almost a year and a half worth of updates. It is therefore recommended for new installations and upgrades from Mageia 4. The new images are available from the downloads page, both directly and through torrents. Read more Also: After a long wait, Mageia was released! Well, sort of...