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What’s the Difference Between Chromium and Chrome?

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Google

On Linux, Chromium can often be installed directly from your Linux distribution’s software repositories. On Ubuntu Linux, for example, it can be installed by opening the Ubuntu Software Center, searching for Chromium, and clicking Install. It will be updated with security updates from your Linux distribution’s software repositories.

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Google's Chrome to pull plug on plugins next September

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Google
  • Google's Chrome to pull plug on plugins next September

    Google is moving ahead with its plan to end support for Netscape plugins in its Chrome browser – and has set next September as the date for when they will stop working altogether.

  • The Final Countdown for NPAPI

    Last September we announced our plan to remove NPAPI support from Chrome, a change that will improve Chrome’s security, speed, and stability as well as reduce complexity in the code base. Since our last update, NPAPI usage has continued its decline. Given this usage data, we will continue with our deprecation plan.

  • Fair Warning: Chrome Team Starts Final Countdown for NPAPI Extensions

    As we've reported several times, Google is introducing big changes in its Chrome browser, especially when it comes to how the browser handles extensions. If you've regularly used either or both of the most popular open source Internet browsers--Google Chrome and Mozilla Firefox--then you're probably familiar with the performance and security problems that some extensions for them can cause.

How Google Inbox shares 70% of its code across Android, iOS, and the Web

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Google
OSS

Launching a new app in the mobile age is hard. If you want to reach a wide audience, you usually have to make your client three times at minimum: once for Android, once for iOS, and once more for the Web. Building an app on three different platforms means three times the work, with three times as many bugs to squish. To make matters more complicated, these clients all use different programming languages: Objective-C and/or Swift for iOS, Java for Android, and JavaScript/CSS/HTML5 for the Web.

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Dirt-cheap laptops might be this year's stocking stuffer

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Android
GNU
Linux
Google

Chromebooks, the low-cost compute devices that run Google’s Chrome OS, haven’t necessarily been showcased in Black Friday circulars, but they’re making an impression nonetheless. Although prices vary, Chromebooks generally range from $200 to $350 or so, and now come loaded with up to 1TB of Google Drive storage, too.

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Google's Massive New Android Update Just Launched, But Some Users Are Already Reporting A Big Problem

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Android
Google

Some users are reporting that there's an issue with Google's new Android 5.0 Lollipop update that prevents them from sending text messages, according to a thread in Google's official forum for tracking bugs in Android (via Phone Arena).

In the original complaint, one user says he or she is unable to send SMS text messages. The message would appear to be sent, but the receiver would never actually get the text.

The problem appears to be affecting specific carrier versions of the Nexus 5, according to the posts in the forum that date back to Nov 16.

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Running XFCE on Chrome OS

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GNU
Linux
Google

I know what you are thinking. Big deal. Folks have been running Crouton, Chrubuntu, and even Xubuntu for some time now on their Chromebooks. Yes, but what about running XFCE straight from the cloud itself. A webapp, if you may, without an offline mode.

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Digitimes Research: Lenovo, Asustek to launch US$149 Chromebook

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GNU
Linux
Google

Lenovo and Asustek are expected to release Chromebooks using Google-certified solutions from China-based Rockchip in the first half of 2015 at the latest, and their devices are expected to be priced at US$149, a new low for notebook products, according to Digitimes Research's latest finding from the Greater China supply chain.

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Red Hat Launches Linux Container Beta With Docker And Google Kubernetes Support

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Red Hat
Server
Google

Red Hat recognizes the changing face of enterprise computing involves containerization technology and to that end, they announced a Beta release of their Linux container platform called Red Hat Enterprise Linux Atomic Host.

Containerization is a new trend that offers a more efficient and faster way to deliver applications than virtual machine technology. In a sense, it’s another step in virtualization that takes the concept and strips it down even further to produce greater resource efficiencies and faster deployment.

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Google Open Sources Sophisticated Network Security Tool

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Google
OSS
Security

Google has announced an open source tool for testing network traffic security called Nogotofail. The project is now available on GitHub, and Google is inviting the community to work with it and help improve the security of networks and the Internet.

Many people are familiar with the “HTTPS everywhere” tool, and a related Firefox add-on, which protect online security. Nogotofail is a roughly similar tool, but is more robust. Here are the details.

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Also: Google Releases Nogotofail Tool to Test Network Security

Chromebooks: Debunking the misconceptions

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GNU
Linux
Google

Chromebooks are the little laptops that could. They are relatively inexpensive and have capabilities that can work for a wide range of companies and consumers.

That's if they are given a chance. There are some common misconceptions about Chromebooks and Chrome OS that prevent many from trying them.

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More in Tux Machines

Linux 4.2 May Finish Fixing Up Radeon Audio Support

Since the Linux 4.0 kernel there has been DisplayPort audio support for the open-source Radeon driver. That DP audio handling came after a big rework to the audio code in the Radeon DRM kernel driver. A half-year later it looks like all the audio code is now cleaned up and ready. Read more Also: Radeon Gallium3D Tackles A Bit More, OpenGL 4.1 Patches Pending NVIDIA 352.30 GPU Driver For Linux Has Been Released

LibreOffice 5.0 Right Around the Corner, Guided Tour of LibreOffice

  • LibreOffice 5.0 Right Around the Corner
    Major release LibreOffice 5.0 is due next Wednesday with a lot of new features. Italo Vignoli today posted The Road to LibreOffice 5.0 in which he looks back at all the added features since January 2015 with version 3.3. Today's summary shows "the impressive amount of new features added to LibreOffice since version 3.3." LibreOffice 3.3 was released in January 2011. This release was significant in that the development and management of LibreOffice had come together in a short time and put out a release that brought several new features. SVG support, easier title and page formatting and numbering, improved ergonomics in Calc, and Microsoft Works support were among the newest features added by The Document Foundation.
  • A Guided Tour of LibreOffice
    I have been using LibreOffice since it was called Star Office and all documents opened in a tabbed interface, as in most modern spreadsheet applications (anyone remember those days?). From those early days until now, I have considered Star Office/OpenOffice.org/LibreOffice to be an excellent, if not superior, tool compared to many on the market.

CoreOS CEO: Security is fundamental

In an interview, CEO Alex Polvi claims his company invented the cloud-native OS category and discusses how CoreOS's update strategy differs from the likes of Red Hat Read more

KDE and Akademy

  • KDE at FISL 16
    Many of you already know that FISL (The International Free Software Forum) is one of the biggest FLOSS conferences in the world. From 8 to 11 July 2015, 5281 free software passionate people met in Porto Alegre (South Brazil) for the 16th FISL edition, enjoying activities such as talks, panels, hackathons, workshops, and community meetings. All kinds of FLOSS-related topics were in place: development, translation, artwork, education, robotics, entrepreneurship, audio-visual, women and gender, politics, academia and research ... Phew! that's tiring :) KDE has a long and memorable history at FISL and it wasn't different this year.
  • Busy is fun!
    The beginning of the day was reading some social media in the morning with breakfast catching up with the times. While going though my Google+ feed I saw a post that I seen before about the a bug with a krunner plugin. The plugin in question was this which Riddell, Dan and I debugged to find some more info about the bug such as that is effects Kubuntu, Arch and openSUSE so it is upstream related.
  • Akademy Day Trip
  • KDE Akademy 2015 Videos Are Now Appearing Online
  • Akademy 2015
    The organising team have done a fantastic job: we’ve had free busses running from our accommodation to the venue, video recording of talks (which I’m sure someone will post about soon), easy to access food, two parties and people always on-hand to provide information.
  • The Failure of KDE Activities
    KDE Activities are multiple desktops. While easy to understand, they open up the possibility of new methods of workspace organization as well as new ways to layout the desktop. They deserve to be recognized as an innovation as important as tabbed browsing, and should be a part of every desktop environment, yet most users have only vaguely heard of them, and even fewer have tried them. When a feature so elegant is ignored, something has clearly gone wrong -- but what, exactly? One thing is certain: Activities are one of the least unpublicized features on any desktop. From their introduction in KDE 4.0 to their implementation in Plasma 5, Activities have never had any online help. If you go to the desktop toolkit, you can click on Activities, but nothing suggests why you should bother. How to create an Activity is reasonably obvious with a little exploration, but why you would want to is never explained.
  • KDE Plasma Goes Mobile
    While FOSS Force gave you a look at setting up KDE Plasma on the desktop in Don Parris’ article last week, KDE recently jumped into the mobile fray by announcing KDE Plasma Mobile at their Akademy conference this week in Spain. While it joins an already crowded field, with the likes of Android, Ubuntu Touch, Firefox OS and others already in the mobile OS space, Plasma Mobile “offers a free — as in freedom and beer — user-friendly, privacy-enabling, customizable platform for mobile devices,” wrote Sebastian Kugler, a lead architect, on KDE’s website. “Plasma Mobile is currently under development with a prototype available providing basic functions to run on a smartphone.”
  • KDE Started Working At Fiber, A New QML-Based Internet Browser
  • Fiber Update
    The original plan was to allow an extension to handle the more crazy form-factors, but as I was blueprinting the APIs on paper I quickly found the tab-bar becoming a nightmarish monster which would have made custom tab extensions painful. Ultimately as a shortcut until a nice API can be made (and many more critical APIs can be rolled out) I’ll be adding sidebar tabs as a native feature. I may look at some sort of button form-factor as well, such as the ones commonly seen in mobile browsers.
  • Porting Qt applications to Wayland
    During Akademy I hold a session about porting applications to Wayland. I collected some of the general problems I saw in various KDE projects and want to highlight them in this blog post, too.