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Acer Taking Chrome OS, Cloud Apps to the Desktop

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GNU
Linux
Google

The Chromebase also has has two 3W audio speakers and HDMI out, USB 3.0, USB 2.0 ports in addition to 802.11a/b/g/n Wi-Fi and Bluetooth 4.0 wireless connectivity options.

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Original: Acer Announces Industry’s First Chrome OS AIO PC with Touch Display

Google announces Drive for Linux

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Linux
Google

Google just announced a slew of Chrome OS powered devices, including a Flip Chromebook from ASUS and a Chromebit device which is a complete Chrome OS device on a stick.

Buried under these announcements where the arrival of Google Drive for Linux. For some reason Google doesn’t have Linux on their priority list anymore this Drive for Linux didn’t even get their own press release.

Katie Roberts-Hoffman, Engineer and ARM Wrestler at Google wrote in a blog post announcing the new Chrome OS devices, “Google Drive for Linux brings the much requested service to those enterprise customers who run their businesses on Linux.”

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Google's Chromebit Turns Any TV Into a Chrome PC for Under $100

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Linux
Google

Google just introduced a whole new kind of Chrome OS computer—a dongle that plugs into any HDMI-equipped display. It’s called a Chromebit, and it isn’t your run-of-the-mill streaming stick. For under $100, you’re looking at a full computer that plugs right into your TV.

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Hisense And Haier Launch $149 Chromebooks

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GNU
Linux
Google

A few weeks ago Google made headlines with the launch of the new Chromebook Pixel, the highest-end Chromebook on the market (and with a price to show for it). Today, the Chrome OS laptop ecosystem is launching two products that are the exact opposite: the Haier Chromebook 11 (now available online at Amazon) and the Hisense Chromebook (now available at Walmart). Both of these 11.6-inch Chromebooks will retail for $149, making them the most affordable Chromebooks yet.

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Also: Hands on: The $149 Hisense Chromebook succeeds at being incredibly affordable

Chromebook pilot tests open source learning resources

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GNU
Linux
Google

Two teachers in Cumberland County are offering up their classrooms as testing ground for new technology. Students in Sarah Pharris' seventh-grade language arts students and Jackie Hancock's seventh-grade math students are using Chromebooks and a variety of Google learning tools to facilitate instruction in their classrooms.

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Material Design, Google Now Support and Timezone Autoupdate Will Come to Chrome OS

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GNU
Linux
Google

Google has announced a couple of days ago, on March 27, that the Chrome OS Beta channel is now open to anyone daring to test the upcoming major release of the Linux kernel-based operating system designed for Chromebooks, which will bring a number of attractive features.

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Why Android 5.1 Is A Step Up From Android 5.0

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Android
Google

One of the major modifications in Android's newest system update, revolves around the 'quick settings' menu. For those who aren't aware, sliding down the notifications bar twice(or once with two fingers), brings up a quick settings menu, within which one can toggle settings like screen brightness, WiFi, Bluetooth, a flashlight, airplane mode, auto rotate settings, location, screen casting etc. Additionally, in Android 5.0, activating a specific toggle led to it being added to the quick settings menu, the first time they're activated. In Android 5.1 however, it is possible to hide these icons with a long press.

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Head 2 Head: Android OS vs. Chrome OS

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Android
Google

A large part of Google’s OS success hasn’t been because of its awesomeness. No. Frankly, we think nothing speaks louder than the almighty dollar in this world. But both are “free,” right? So this is tie? Not really. Although Android is technically free since Google doesn’t charge device makers for it, there are costs associated with getting devices “certified.” Oh, yeah, and then there’s Apple and Microsoft, both of which get healthy payouts from device makers through patent lawsuits. Microsoft reportedly makes far more from Android sales than Windows Phone sales. You just generally don’t see the price because it’s abstracted by carriers. Chrome OS, on the other hand, actually is pretty much free. A top-ofthe-line Chromebook is $280, while a top-of-the-line Android phone full retail is usually $600. We’re giving this one to Chrome OS because if it’s generally cheaper for the builder, it’s cheaper for you.

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Bazel: Google Build Tool is now Open Source

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Google
OSS

Bazel, the tool that Google uses to build the majority of its software has been partially open sourced. According to Google, Bazel is aimed to build “code quickly and reliably” and is “critical to Google’s ability to continue to scale its software development practices as the company grows.”

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Also: Q&A: Databases, Open Source & Virtualisation with CEO Vinay Joosery

Google makes deploying software on its cloud a trivial task

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Google

Google is offering a new incentive for using its Google Compute Engine. With Google Cloud Launcher, you can launch more than 120 popular open-source packages.

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Unix and Personal Computers: Reinterpreting the Origins of Linux

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Kubuntu 15.04 With Plasma 5.3 - A Totally Different Kubuntu

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  • Spring break for the KDE system monitor