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Google

Is Google the New Microsoft?

Filed under
Google

Yeah, Google. The company that’s popularized two Linux distributions — or at least, two operating systems using the Linux kernel. The company that’s given consumers free use of Docs and Drive, and which owns and operates the servers where tens of millions of people store their photos and music — and for free unless they like music too much and need extra storage. Google, which through its browser gave Linux users the gift of Netflix — something of a trojan gift, to be sure, but a valuable gift just the same.

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Google has quietly launched a GitHub competitor, Cloud Source Repositories

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Development
Google

Google hasn’t announced it yet, but the company earlier this year started offering free beta access to Cloud Source Repositories, a new service for storing and editing code on the ever-expanding Google Cloud Platform.

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Not OK, Google: Chromium voice extension pulled after spying concerns

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Google
Security

Google has removed an extension from Chromium, the open source sibling to the Chrome browser, after accusations that the extension was installed surreptitiously and subsequently eavesdropped on Chromium users.

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A Chromebook replaced the MacBook Pro on my desk

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GNU
Linux
Google
Mac

The Acer Chromebook 13 so impressed me when I reviewed it months ago that I bought one. After using it for months it has replaced the 13-inch MacBook Pro as my daily work system in the office.

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Also: Google was downloading audio listeners onto computers without consent, say Chromium users

When You Use Google.com, You Use Linux

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Linux
Google

It's hard to imagine just how big Google is and what scale it operates, but there is one thing that everyone should know and that it's not all that surprising. Their servers are running a custom OS based on Linux.

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Chromebooks Spread Out, with Acer and Microsoft Responding

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GNU
Linux
Google

If you stay tuned to news from U.S. school districts, you'll see that school systems are purchasing Chromebooks at a steady clip. Westwood High School in Massachussetts is buying Chromebooks to issue to students who will return them once they graduate. The Bell-Chatham school board has approved Chromebook purchases for students, as has the Sumner School District.

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Chrome, Debian Linux, and the secret binary blob download riddle

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Google
Security
Debian

"Anyway, I haven't said that banning such software from Debian would be the only solution... but at least these incidents come far too frequent recently, so apparently something needs to be done at Debian level to pro-actively prevent future cases/compromises like this."

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First impressions of Chromixium OS 1.0

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Google
Reviews

My point is that people who are likely to enjoy Chromebooks and use their computers almost solely for accessing the web will probably find Chromixium quite useful. However, while it is technically possible to access more features and off-line software through Chromixium's application menu, the process is slow and awkward when compared with other desktop Linux distributions. Granted, Chromixium is still in its early stages, it just hit version 1.0, so the standalone features will probably improve in time. For now, I think Chromixium offers an interesting web-focused environment with the fallback option of using locally installed applications. The implementation has some rough edges at the moment, but I suspect it will get better in future releases.

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Most popular web browsers among Fedora users

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Life in a Post-Container World and Why Linux Will Play a Diminished Role

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FFmpeg's Leader Resigns, Hopes To Make Libav Developers Come Back

Michael Niedermayer, the leader of the FFmpeg project for the past eleven years, has made a surprise announcement today: he's resigning as its leader. Niedermayer is resigning as he no longer feels he's the best leader for FFmpeg, given the current Libav fork still persisting even after Debian dropped Libav and is returning to FFmpeg. Read more

30 Sys Admins to Follow on SysAdmin Day

Systems administrators: They keep our high-tech world up and running. From capacity planning, to 3 a.m. phone calls, to retiring that 10-year-old server that uses more power than your whole house, sys admins do it all. Open source communities would not be able to thrive without the networks, services, and tools that allow for communication and collaboration, and sys admins are the ones who work thanklessly year-round to keep them going. July 31 is System Administrator Appreciation Day, a day for all of us to express our undying gratitude for sys admins. Sure, you could buy your favorite sys admin cake and ice cream, or perhaps a nice gift card. You could even go as far as not breaking the server for just one day. You also can follow these 30 sys admins. Read more