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More on Chrome 63

Filed under
Google
Software
Web

New Chrome Browser and End of Chrome Web Store

Filed under
Google
Web
  • Chrome 63 rolling out to Mac, Windows, and Linux w/ Flags redesign, Site Certificate shortcut

    Chrome 63 is rolling out to Mac, Windows, and Linux today with an assortment of developer-focused features and security fixes. The biggest additions in this desktop release are a redesigned chrome://flags page and a tweaked permissions dropdown.

  • Chrome Apps are dead, as Google shuts down the Chrome Web Store section

    More than a year ago, Google announced that Chrome Apps would be removed from Windows, Mac, and Linux versions of Chrome (but not Chrome OS) some time in 2017, and it seems we've come to that point today. Google has shut down the "app" section of the Chrome Web Store for those platforms, meaning you can't install Chrome Apps anymore. Google has started sending out emails to Chrome app developers telling them that Chrome Apps are deprecated, and while previously installed apps still work, the functionality will be stripped out of Chrome in Q1 2018.

Raspberry Pi Vision

Filed under
Google
Hardware
  • Google is making a computer vision kit for Raspberry Pi

    Google is offering a new way for Raspberry Pi tinkerers to use its AI tools. It just announced the AIY Vision Kit, which includes a new circuit board and computer vision software that buyers can pair with their own Raspberry Pi computer and camera. (There’s also a cute cardboard box included, along with some supplementary accessories.) The kit costs $44.99 and will ship through Micro Center on December 31st.

  • Google made a computer vision kit so your Raspberry Pi devices can see

    At Google I/O earlier this year, Google wasn't shy about discussing technologies like artificial intelligence and machine learning and how it is committed to integrating them into its products and services. So, it's not surprising to see the company announce AIY Vision Kit. It includes a new circuit board and computer vision software that you can connect to your tiny, low-cost Raspberry Pi computer and camera.

  • Google introduces $45 AIY Vision Kit for DIY computer vision hardware projects

    Google is launching a new hardware and software kit aimed at developers and hackers who want to build products that incorporate computer vision… on a budget.

Microsoft Worker Leaves for Google, Criticizes Post-Windows Vista Dev Strategy

Filed under
Google
Microsoft

Microsoft employee Tim Sneath, who spent no less than 17 years with the company, announced in a blog post that he’s leaving the software giant to work for Google on the new Flutter mobile framework.

Sneath started his post by emphasizing how great Microsoft is, explaining that he company has “incredibly diverse interests” and is “filled with talented people.”

Despite the good parts, however, the former Microsoft Program Manager who worked on a series of projects for developers, discussed what he described as the “missteps” that the Redmond-based software giant embraced beginning with the Windows Vista era.

Read more

Also: ‘Goodbye Microsoft, hello Linux’

The Fox Hunt - Firefox and friends compared

Filed under
Google
Moz/FF
Web

So what should you use? Well, it depends. You want extensions, the entire repertoire as it's meant to be? Go with Pale Moon, but be aware of the inconsistencies and problems down the road. However, another piece of penalty is less than optimal looks. If you are more focused on speed and future development, then it's Firefox, as it offers the most complete compromise. The add-ons will make it or break it. Waterfox makes less sense, because the margins of benefit are too small.

My take is - Firefox. It's not ideal, but Pale Moon does not solve the problem fully, it combines nostalgia with technicals, and that's a rough patch, even though the project is quite admirable in what it's trying to do. Alas, I'm afraid the old extensions will die, and the new ones won't be compatible, so the browser will be left stranded somewhere in between. But hopefully, this little comparison test gives you a better overview and understanding how things work.

Finally, we go back to the question of speed. We've seen how one flavor of Fox stacks against another, but what about Chrome? I will answer that in a follow-up article, which will compare Chrome to Vivaldi, again based on popular demand, and then we will also check how all these different browsers compare using my small, limited and entirely personal corner of the Web. Stay tuned.

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Also: Firefox Private Browsing vs. Chrome Incognito: Which is Faster?

OnePlus 5T Launched

Filed under
Android
Google
  • OnePlus 5T Keeps the Headphone Jack, Introduces Face Unlock and Parallel Apps

    Five months after it launched its OnePlus 5 flagship Android smartphone, OnePlus unveiled today its successor, the OnePlus 5T, running the latest Android 8.0 (Oreo) mobile OS.

    OnePlus held a live event today in New York City to tell us all about the new features it implemented in the OnePlus 5T, and they don't disappoint as the smartphone features a gorgeous and bright 6.0-inches Optic AMOLED capacitive touchscreen with multitouch, a 1080x2160 pixels resolution, 18:9 ratio, and approximately 402 PPI density. The design has been changed a bit as well for OnePlus 5T, which is made of anodized aluminum.

  • OnePlus 5T Launched: Comes With Bigger Screen, Better Dual Camera, And Face Unlock

    Whenever costly phones like iPhone X or Google Pixel 2 are bashed (here and here) and their alternatives are discussed, OnePlus is always mentioned. In the past few years, the company has amassed a fan base that has found the concept of “Never Settle” impressive.

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Split Screen is Coming to Google's Pixelbook Chromebook, Here's a Sneak Peek

Filed under
GNU
Linux
Google

Good news for PixelBook owners today as Chromium evangelist at Google François Beaufort informs the community via his Google+ page that split screen support is coming to the Chromebook Pixel.

In an attempt to improve the multitasking capabilities of Chromebooks, Google implemented split screen support in the latest Chrome OS Dev channel via a new flag called "Split view in Tablet mode," which can be enabled only on the Google Pixelbook.

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Chromebooks Run Chrome OS, GNU/Linux (e.g. Crouton), and 'Windows' (CrossOver)

Filed under
GNU
Linux
Google

Chromium in Slackware, New Chrome Beta

Filed under
Google
Web
  • [Slackware] Chromium is now compiled using clang

    In my previous blog post about Chromium 62, I described the issues I had while attempting to compile it on Slackware14.2. The gcc compiler suite on Slackware 14.2 is “too old” for Chromium because it lacks the required C++11 support. More to the point, the Google developers use clang instead of gcc for their own compilations and therefore gcc support is becoming stale. Response by Google developers when they encounter a gcc-related bug report is to ‘please switch to clang’.

  • Google Pushes Chrome 63 Into Beta with Dynamic Module Imports, Device Memory API

    Google recently pushed the Chrome 63 web browser for beta testing for all supported platforms, giving us a heads up to what we should expect from this release when it hits stable next month.

    Google Chrome 63 now lives in the Beta channel pocket, and it can be installed on Chrome OS, Linux, Android, Mac, and Windows operating systems. It promises big changes for developers, including dynamic module imports, a new Device Memory API, permissions UI changes, as well as async generators and iterators.

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More in Tux Machines

Red Hat Hires From Microsoft; Fedora 27 Release Party at Taipei

Devices: Advantech, Tizen, F-Droid

OSS Leftovers

  • Why no more new AND successful FOSS projects in the last ten years?
     

    If you ask me, the new, successful FOSS projects should be project that fix, replace, rewrite, whatever… the really unglamorous, low-level tools, libraries and so on that would make that happen. Yes, I know that this is really unlikely to happen under current business models and until IoT everywhere, new iPhones every year and the like are perceived as higher priorities, regardless of their environmental impacts and, very often, sheer lack of sense.

  • FOSS Backstage - CfP open
    It's almost ten years ago that I attended my first ApacheCon EU in Amsterdam. I wasn't entirely new to the topic of open source or free software. I attended several talks on Apache Lucene, Apache Solr, Hadoop, Tomcat, httpd (I still remember that the most impressive stories didn't necessarily come from the project members, but from downstream users. They were the ones authorized to talk publicly about what could be done with the project - and often became committers themselves down the road.
  • Liveblogging RIT’s FOSS projects class: initial questions for community spelunking
    Stephen Jacobs (SJ) and I are co-teaching “Project in FOSS Development” at RIT this semester, which basically means “hey students, want to get course credit for contributing to a FOSS project?” The class is centered around 5 project sprints of two weeks each. The first 3 weeks of class are preparing for the sprint periods; the week before spring break is a pause to reflect on how sprints are going. Otherwise, class efforts will be centered around executing project work… (aka “getting stuff done”).
  • Design’N’Buy launches All-In-One Designer on Magento Open Source 2.2
    Design’N’Buy announces the launch of their flagship product – the AIOD on Magento Open Source Version 2.2. With the launch of web to print solution on Magento Version 2.2 , Design’N’Buy becomes first event in web to print industry to offer complete eCommerce printing solution for printers on one of the widest and latest technology platform.
  • Singapore: Blockchain startup Bluzelle raises $19.5m through ICO
    Singapore-based decentralised database provider Bluzelle has announced that its initial coin offering (ICO) has raised $19.5 million in funding, according to a press statement.
  • Blockchain Startup Bluzelle Raises $19.5M USD In ICO
    Bluzelle’ advisor list includes the likes of Brian Fox, creator of GNU Bash, Alex Leverington, one of the original Core ethereum developers, Prashant Malik, co-creator of Apache Cassandra and Ryan Fugger, the original creator of the cryptocurrency Ripple.
  • The Document Liberation project announces five new or improved libraries
    The Document Liberation Project has announced five new or improved libraries to export EPUB3 and import AbiWord, MS Publisher, PageMaker and QuarkXPress files.
  • Lawsuit accuses PACER of milking the public for cash in exchange for access
    The federally run online court document access system known as PACER now finds itself listed on a federal docket. Its overseer, the US government, is a defendant in a proposed class-action lawsuit accusing the service of overcharging the public. The suit, brought by three nonprofits on Thursday, claims millions of dollars generated from a recent 25-percent increase in page fees are being illegally spent by the Administrative Office of the Courts (AO). The cost for access is 10 cents per page and up to $3 a document. Judicial opinions are free. This isn't likely to break the bank for some, but to others it adds up and can preclude access to public records. The National Consumer Law Center, the Alliance for Justice, and the National Veterans Legal Services Program also claim in the lawsuit that these fees are illegal because the government is charging more than necessary to keep the PACER system afloat (as is required by Congress).
  • Is the Most Massive, Illegal Paywall in the World About to Come Down?
    A groundbreaking lawsuit is poised to decimate what is arguably the most unjust, destructive, and it now sounds like illegal paywall in the world, the Public Access to Court Electronic Records, PACER. PACER is the federal government court documents repository. Every federal court document, for every case, lives in PACER. It’s essentially a giant FTP document repository with a horrendous search system bolted on, not dissimilar to EDGAR. PACER was created in 1988 to enable access to court records electronically. Initially available only in courthouses the system was expanded to the web in 2001.
  • Codasip Announces Studio 7, Design and Productivity Tools for Rapid Generation of RISC-V Processors
    Codasip, the leading supplier of RISC-V® embedded processor IP, today announced that it has launched the 7th generation of its Studio, the unique IP-design and customization software that allows for fast configuration and optimization of RISCV processors, customer-proprietary processor architectures, and their accompanying software development toolchains.
  • EE4J Code Begins the Journey to Open Source
    The EE4J project, which was created to manage the Eclipse Foundation’s stewardship of Java EE technologies following Oracle’s decision to open source them, is starting to gain traction. Soon after the project was created, EclipseLink and Yasson (the official reference implementation of Java JSON Binding, JSR-367) became the first two projects to be transferred under the EE4J umbrella. As reported in December, the announcement was made that seven more projects were being proposed.

Database SQLite 3.22.0 Released