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Interviews

Interview with Clément Mona

Filed under
KDE
Interviews

I wanted to try someting different and a friend of mine showed me Krita in 2017.

I loved how intuitive Krita is, I handled the program very fast, more over my Wacom tablet worked perfectly on it, and that was not the case with oher applications at this time.

I love how fast I can paint with Krita. Also, the brush customisation is very nice and complete.

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In Free Software, the Community is the Most Important Ingredient: Jerry Bezencon of Linux Lite [Interview]

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Interviews

Jerry Bezencon, the creator of Linux Lite project, shares some interesting details about this popular lightweight Linux distribution.
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In Free Software, the Community is the Most Important Ingredient: Jerry Bezencon of Linux Lite [Interview]

Filed under
GNU
Linux
Interviews

Linux Lite was started in 2012 for 3 important reasons. One, I wanted to dispel myths that a Linux based operating system was hard to use. Two, at that time, there was a shortage of simple, intuitive desktop experiences on Linux that offered long-term support. Three, I had used Linux for over 10 years before starting Linux Lite.

I felt I needed to give back to a community that had given so much to me. A community that taught me that by sharing code and knowledge, one could have a dramatically positive impact over peoples computing experiences.

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Debian Edu interview: Yvan Masson

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Interviews
Debian

It is free software! Built on Debian, I am sure that users are not spied upon, and that it can run on low end hardware. This last point is very important, because we really need to improve "green IT". I do not know enough about Skolelinux / Debian Edu to tell how it is better than another free software solution, but what I like is the "all in one" solution: everything has been thought of and prepared to ease installation and usage.

I like Free Software because I hate using something that I can not understand. I do not say that I can understand everything nor that I want to understand everything, but knowing that someone / some company intentionally prevents me from understanding how things work is really unacceptable to me.

Secondly, and more importantly, free software is a requirement to prevent abuses regarding human rights and environmental care. Humanity can not rely on tools that are in the hands of small group of people.

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Interview with Jefferson Nascimento

Filed under
KDE
Interviews

I use Linux as a main OS from time to time, in 2016 I was searching open source alternatives for drawing, back in the days I was using MyPaint, I never liked Gimp for drawing, so I used an “alternative” copy of other software, but not Photoshop, I never liked to draw with Photoshop. Then I found this piece of software that looked like a good alternative and tried. It fit all my expectations.

Tough one. Can I say David Revoy? or Wolthera? I learned so much from those two. Ok, enough kidding, I love the layer management. I don’t have to use the mouse to quickly rename and organize everything, I worked in an office where I had to use Photoshop, and man, oh man, I suddenly realized why every artist ever who uses Photoshop doesn’t rename layers, it’s just terrible.

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Paul Cormier brings an engineer’s eye to top role at Red Hat

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Red Hat
Interviews

Red Hat Inc. opens the virtual doors of its annual Red Hat Summit this week amid a major leadership shift at both the open-source giant and its parent, IBM Corp.

Less than three weeks ago Arvind Krishna took over as chief executive of IBM, becoming the first engineer to hold the position in the company’s 106-year history. At the same time, Jim Whitehurst ascended to the role of IBM president and Paul Cormier (pictured at the 2018 summit) assumed the CEO spot at Red Hat.

Like Krishna, Cormier is the first engineer to lead his company. That’s appropriate, he said in an interview with SiliconANGLE. The technology landscape is becoming more complex and there’s more at stake when customers make decisions.

“There’s so much more fear, uncertainty and doubt out there that it takes more technically savvy people to wade through it,” he said. “It’s a much more complex sale now than it used to be.”

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Interview with Joshua Grier

Filed under
KDE
Interviews

I heard about it through some artists I follow. Sinix and Sycra have Youtube videos showcasing the software from a while back.

I found the brush engine stood out to me over competing programs. It felt and still feels far more intuitive and more well designed for art and design than other packages I’ve tried to use.

I love that Krita is accessible to all of the creative community, I love how versatile/customizable it is and how high quality it is and continues to be as it’s improved over the years!

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Responding to crisis: IBM’s Jim Whitehurst draws from open-source lessons to address a rapidly changing world

Filed under
Red Hat
Interviews

IBM reported its earnings on Monday, one of the first companies to do so in the current reporting period. Included in the company’s report were a number of stories associated with helping its customers, including support for one major U.S. insurance firm as it transitioned to a remote work model when none existed before.

IBM indicated that 95% of its own workforce of 350,000 employees was working remotely as well. This was a major driver for sourcing input and issuing expectations around working in the current environment.

“A lot of it is to recognize that it’s hard to know the stress that people are under or what they need to do to be effective,” Whitehurst said. “So, it’s the perfect time to back up and say: ‘Hey, you have to figure some of this out and tell us what you need to be successful.’”

In addition to making adjustments for its own employees as a result of COVID-19, IBM has also been working within its family of companies to develop new tools and resources for the global community to use during the pandemic.

One such tool was developed by the Weather Co. to map and analyze the spread of confirmed cases. It’s part of what Whitehurst views as part of the community coming together in a time of significant crisis without needing orders from him or IBM Chief Executive Officer Arvind Krishna.

“Within a matter of days, the Weather Channel app, which is an IBM app, had a COVID button on it so you could see down to your county level the number of people infected,” Whitehurst explained. “That bubbled up — that wasn’t a top down with Arvind and me saying ‘let’s go do that.’ Having people broadly inside of corporations decide what role to play in society is a really helpful thing.”

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Also: Responding to crisis: IBM's Jim Whitehurst plans to open-source lessons learned from pandemic [Ed: Same text, not the same headline]

The Linux Setup – Jared Domínguez, Red Hat

Filed under
Linux
Interviews

Jared’s perspective as someone whose job is to get Linux running on different hardware is interesting. I never thought about the planning it takes to coordinate future hardware and software releases. Reading through this, I kept thinking about how much Jared had to live in the future. I also appreciated how Jared found his way to Linux through his father. It’s sweet to think about a little kid seeing all of these terminals and tapes and wanting to know how it all works. It’s part of the reason I try to announce ‘Linux’ every time my daughter wanders up to my computer.

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Red Hat’s new CEO talks about navigating the gradual recovery from the coronavirus

Filed under
Red Hat
Interviews

There was no celebration in Raleigh when Paul Cormier was appointed this week to replace Jim Whitehurst as Red Hat’s CEO.

With the coronavirus pandemic at its peak in the U.S. and every Red Hat employee working from home, the 62-year-old former head of products and technologies began his reign as CEO from his home in Boston, relying on email and BlueJeans video conferencing technology to address the more than 12,000 Red Hat employees around the world.

His immediate task will be to guide the company, which employs more than 2,000 people in downtown Raleigh, out of the doldrums of a coronavirus-caused economic downturn. “This is going to be a marathon,” he told his employees, “and it’s more important than ever to continue to support one another right now.”

A day after assuming the title of Red Hat CEO, Cormier sat down with the N&O via a BlueJeans videoconference to discuss how the company is responding to the disruption of the COVID-19 pandemic and how it is navigating its new relationship with IBM.

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Also: How Red Hat's New CEO Handles Life Under IBM -- and a Global Pandemic

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