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Interviews

Mark Shuttleworth on the future of Ubuntu

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Interviews

lwn.net: The life of South African Mark Shuttleworth has been a kind of geek dream. Here, he talks to Glyn Moody about Ubuntu's new focus on the server side, why Ubuntu could switch from GNOME to KDE, and what happens to Ubuntu and its commercial arm, Canonical, if Shuttleworth were to fall out of a spaceship.

Michael Chen: India Third-Largest Contributor To Fedora Community

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Linux
Interviews

efytimes.com: Michael Chen, director, Red Hat was recently on a visit to India. In an interview with Swapnil Bhartiya, assistant editor, EFYtimes.com, Chen elucidated upon various issues ranging from the awareness about Linux and open source to India's strengths and the challenges the country is facing in the open source world. Here are some excerpts from the lively exchange.

People of openSUSE: Cornelius Schumacher

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SUSE

opensuse.org: Before openSUSE 11.0 GM get released next Thursday, we have the chance to meet Cornelius Schumacher - member of the incubation team, former Build Service developer, KDE vice president, and also the one who started writing down the openSUSE Guiding Principles.

Walter Bender Discusses Sugar Labs Foundation

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Interviews

openeducation.net: In April, Professor Walter Bender resigned from the highly publicized One Laptop Per Child project. While his departure has caused a lot of speculation as well as commotion within the open source community, the former One Laptop Per Child President of software and content has simply moved forward.

High flyer hangs hat on open source

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Interviews
OSS

australianit.news.com: As chief operating officer, Whitehurst was widely tipped to succeed the outgoing Delta chief executive but despite turning around the corporate basket case his day in the sun never came.

few interviews

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Interviews
  • An Interview with Anurag Bhandari, the Founder of Granular Linux

  • An interview with jacobmp92
  • Anno Scholte: Open Source for Open Systems

People of openSUSE: Matthias Fehring

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Interviews
SUSE

opensuse.org: ‘People of openSUSE’ caught up the man behind the great effort done on the German openSUSE wiki - Matthias Fehring. He is one of the system operatores of the de.opensuse.org wiki and long time openSUSE user.

The A-Z of programming languages: AWK

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Interviews

computerworld.com: Computer scientist and compiler expert Alfred V. Aho is at the forefront of computer science research. Computerworld Australia recently spoke to Professor Aho to learn more about the development of AWK, in the first of a series of investigations into the most widely used programming languages.

The A-Z of Programming Languages: BASH/Bourne-Again Shell

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Interviews

computerworld.com.au: Computerworld is undertaking a series of investigations into the most widely-used programming languages. Previously we spoke to Alfred v. Aho of AWK fame, and in this article we chat to Chet Ramey about his experience maintaining Bash.

Interview: Joel Cohen, writer and associate producer of The Simpsons

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Linux
Interviews

redhatmagazine.com: Joel Cohen is an Emmy award-winning writer and associate producer of The Simpsons. He’s also a keynote speaker at the Red Hat Summit this June. The show is all hand-drawn and digitally animated, and the movie was too. For that purpose, crudely animated scenes were produced with Red Hat Enterprise Linux.

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What the Linux Foundation Does for Linux

Jim Zemlin, the executive director of the Linux Foundation, talks about Linux a lot. During his keynote at the LinuxCon USA event here, Zemlin noted that it's often difficult for him to come up with new material for talking about the state of Linux at this point. Every year at LinuxCon, Zemlin delivers his State of Linux address, but this time he took a different approach. Zemlin detailed what he actually does and how the Linux Foundation works to advance the state of Linux. Fundamentally it's all about enabling the open source collaboration model for software development. "We are seeing a shift now where the majority of code in any product or service is going to be open source," Zemlin said. Zemlin added that open source is the new Pareto Principle for software development, where 80 percent of software code is open source. The nature of collaborative development itself has changed in recent years. For years the software collaboration was achieved mostly through standards organizations. Read more

Arch-based Linux distro KaOS 2014.08 is here with KDE 4.14.0

The Linux desktop community has reached a sad state. Ubuntu 14.04 was a disappointing release and Fedora is taking way too long between releases. Hell, OpenSUSE is an overall disaster. It is hard to recommend any Linux-based operating system beyond Mint. Even the popular KDE plasma environment and its associated programs are in a transition phase, moving from 4.x to 5.x. As exciting as KDE 5 may be, it is still not ready for prime-time; it is recommended to stay with 4 for now. Read more

diff -u: What's New in Kernel Development

One problem with Linux has been its implementation of system calls. As Andy Lutomirski pointed out recently, it's very messy. Even identifying which system calls were implemented for which architectures, he said, was very difficult, as was identifying the mapping between a call's name and its number, and mapping between call argument registers and system call arguments. Some user programs like strace and glibc needed to know this sort of information, but their way of gathering it together—although well accomplished—was very messy too. Read more

GNU hackers discover HACIENDA government surveillance and give us a way to fight back

GNU community members and collaborators have discovered threatening details about a five-country government surveillance program codenamed HACIENDA. The good news? Those same hackers have already worked out a free software countermeasure to thwart the program. According to Heise newspaper, the intelligence agencies of the United States, Canada, United Kingdom, Australia, and New Zealand, have used HACIENDA to map every server in twenty-seven countries, employing a technique known as port scanning. The agencies have shared this map and use it to plan intrusions into the servers. Disturbingly, the HACIENDA system actually hijacks civilian computers to do some of its dirty work, allowing it to leach computing resources and cover its tracks. Read more