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Interviews

The Porteus Team: We consider ourselves a "Portable Linux Community"

Filed under
Linux
Interviews

darkduck.com: But "pocket Linux" is still a toy I love to play with. That's why I have returned to that topic again and have done reviews of SliTaz 4.0 and Puppy Slacko 5.3.1. Today I want to develope this topic a little more, and talk about another "pocket" size Linux distribution. It won't be one-man show, though. Let me introduce my today's guest: Ahau from the Porteus Linux team.

Interview: Linux Foundation executive director Jim Zemlin

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Linux
Interviews

v3.co.uk: Jim Zemlin, as the executive director of The Linux Foundation, campaigns to accelerate the adoption of Linux software. He is widely quoted in the press on open source IT issues, and is a regular keynote speaker at industry events.

Microsoft: We Don’t Compete with Linux, But with Linux Vendors

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Microsoft
Interviews

linuxforu.com: With initiatives like the Imagine Cup and PhoneGap Meetup, Microsoft is surely taking many steps forward to engage with open source communities across the globe, including India.

Libre Office is taking off 'like a rocket'

Filed under
LibO
Interviews

techradar.com: Michael Meeks is a long-time OpenOffice, now Libre Office, contributor and employee of Novell, now Attachmate. We caught up with him to get the inside perspective on the massive changes they, and desktop Linux as a whole, have gone through in the past few years.

The Open Source CEO: Jim Whitehurst

Filed under
Linux
Interviews

techcrunch.com: I spoke to Red Hat CEO Jim Whitehurst recently about the open source culture at Red Hat and he told me it is a journey, not a destination.

An Interview With Linus Torvalds

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Linux
Interviews

techcrunch.com: I had the opportunity to ask Linus a few questions by email. Hopefully I didn’t simply create a nerd version of The Chris Farley Show.

Meet the Linux Tycoon tycoon

Filed under
Linux
Interviews
Gaming

networkworld.com: Linux Tycoon creator Bryan Lunduke may have an unlikely gaming hit on his hands as the buzz begins to spread

Also: Fallout Free Today, Supported By PlayOnLinux

Interview with Fabio Erculiani of Sabayon Linux

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Linux
Interviews

unixmen.com: Fabio Erculiani is the founder and lead developer of the fantastic Sabayon Linux. On this week’s interview, we talk with him about the details of the development, some technical details about “how things work” and the reasons that make Sabayon so unique.

Mozilla opens up over Boot 2 Gecko

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Interviews
Moz/FF

zdnet.co.uk: ZDNet UK talked to Jay Sullivan, vice president of products at Mozilla, to see what difficulties the project has had to overcome, what's in store, and why Boot 2 Gecko (B2G) needs to exist at all.

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More in Tux Machines

Red Hat's Survey in India

From Raspberry Pi to Supercomputers to the Cloud: The Linux Operating System

Linux is widely used in corporations now as the basis for everything from file servers to web servers to network security servers. The no-cost as well as commercial availability of distributions makes it an obvious choice in many scenarios. Distributions of Linux now power machines as small as the tiny Raspberry Pi to the largest supercomputers in the world. There is a wide variety of minimal and security hardened distributions, some of them designed for GPU workloads. Read more

IBM’s Systems With GNU/Linux

  • IBM Gives Power Systems Rebates For Linux Workloads
    Big Blue has made no secret whatsoever that it wants to ride the Linux wave up with the Power Systems platform, and its marketeers are doing what they can to sweeten the hardware deals as best they can without adversely affecting the top and bottom line at IBM in general and the Power Systems division in particular to help that Linux cause along.
  • Drilling Down Into IBM’s System Group
    The most obvious thing is that IBM’s revenues and profits continue to shrink, but the downside is getting smaller and smaller, and we think that IBM’s core systems business will start to level out this year and maybe even grow by the third or fourth quarter, depending on when Power9-based Power Systems and z14-based System z mainframes hit the market. In the final period of 2016, IBM’s overall revenues were $21.77 billion, down 1.1 percent from a year ago, and net income rose by nearly a point to $4.5 billion. This is sure a lot better than a year ago, when IBM’s revenues fell by 8.4 percent to $22 billion and its net income fell by 18.6 percent to $4.46 billion. For the full 2016 year, IBM’s revenues were off 2.1 percent to $79.85 billion, but its “real” systems business, which includes servers, storage, switching, systems software, databases, transaction monitors, and tech support and financing for its own iron, fell by 8.3 percent to $26.1 billion. (That’s our estimate; IBM does not break out sales this way, but we have some pretty good guesses on how it all breaks down.)

Security News

  • DB Ransom Attacks Spread to CouchDB and Hadoop [Ed: Get sysadmins who know what they are doing, as misconfigurations are expensive]
  • Security advisories for Monday
  • Return on Risk Investment
  • Widely used WebEx plugin for Chrome will execute attack code—patch now!
    The Chrome browser extension for Cisco Systems WebEx communications and collaboration service was just updated to fix a vulnerability that leaves all 20 million users susceptible to drive-by attacks that can be carried out by just about any website they visit.
  • DDoS attacks larger, more frequent and complex says Arbor
    Distributed denial-of-service (DDoS) attacks are becoming more frequent and complex, forcing businesses to deploy purpose-built DDoS protection solutions, according to a new infrastructure security report which warns that the threat landscape has been transformed by the emergence of Internet of Things (IoT) botnets. The annual worldwide infrastructure security report from Arbor Networks - the security division of NETSCOUT - reveals that the largest distributed denial-of-service (DDoS) attack reported in 2016 was 800 Gbps, a 60% increase over 2015’s largest attack of 500 Gbps.