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Interviews

Interview with Bryan Wong

Filed under
KDE
Interviews

There are a lot of features that make me love Krita.

First, a lot of those features are very useful for game arts, such as clones array, grid and guide, these make making tiles extremely smooth. I can also make a bunch of clone layers with transform mask to generate spritesheets easily.

Second, the brush engine is powerful. It has masked brush and texture. The soft round brush also allows you to draw your own intensity curve to make an interesting result.

Third, the developer support is excellent. Whenever I report a bug, the developer will respond quickly and will solve the problem. The team really cares about the program and user experience.

And many more…

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Audiocasts/Shows/Screencasts: Open Source Security Podcast, GNU World Order GNU World Order and ArcoLinux 19.11 Run Through

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Interviews
  • Open Source Security Podcast: Episode 168 - The draconian draconians of DRM

    Josh and Kurt talk about the social norms of security. We also discuss security coprocessors and the reasons behind adding them to hardware. Is DRM a draconian security measure or do we need it to secure the future? We also touch on the story of NordVPN getting hacked. The real story isn't they got hacked, the story is they responded like clowns. The actual problem was one of leadership, there are certain leadership skills you can't be taught, you can only learn.

  • GNU World Order 13x45

    An exciting Linux origin story (thanks to Grant), and the **reset** (also called **tset**) and **rev** commands from **util-linux**.

  • ArcoLinux 19.11 Run Through

    In this video, we are looking at ArcoLinux 19.11

LibreOffice Community Member Monday: Petr Valach

Filed under
LibO
Interviews

I was born in Brno, but for nearly 30 years I’ve been living in Prague. I work for a software company where I am member of a mobile applications project. But IT isn’t my only hobby. I do lots of things – personally, astronomy and physics are the most important for me. There is nothing quite so interesting. And I am happy when astronomical or astronautical institutions (for example, the International Space Station) use free and open-source software.

I was member of the scout movement, so scouting is one of my “hobbies” too (it’s not a hobby, but lifestyle). In the Czech Republic, there is something special, a mixture of pure scouting with the education system of our boys’ book author, Jaroslav Foglar. He lead his scout group called The Boys from Beaver River for 60 years and wrote over 20 books, which are bestsellers. Indeed, Jaroslav Foglar is the most successful author in the Czech Republic, who directly or indirectly influenced literally everybody here. I am a member of the community associated around him, and member of Foglar’s association. Recently we’ve had meetings in the Foglar group clubhouse every month.

I am a member of the editors of OpenOffice.cz (focused on LibreOffice and OpenOffice.cz) and LinuxEXPRES (focused on free and open-source software generally). I am lead editor at ExoSpace.cz, which supports these magazines and websites, the Czech community around LibreOffice, other astronomical and astronautical magazines and more.

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Building trust in the Linux community

Filed under
Linux
Interviews

Roughly 20 years ago, while I was taking classes on Windows 2000 Server, I started acquiring parts of older machines that were slated for disposal and managed to piece together at least one fully working system with a monitor, keyboard, and mouse. The home computer at the time was running Windows 98 or ME, I can’t recall, but I didn’t have any OS to put on this older system. Somehow, I stumbled across Mandrake Linux and loaded it up. It all seemed to work okay from what I could tell, so I put an ad in the local newspaper classifieds to see if anyone needed a computer for free. I got exactly one response to that ad. I packed up the computer and took it to their house. I found out it was a family with a special needs son and they wanted to get him learning on the computer. I set it up on the little table they wanted to use as a desk, they thanked me, and I left. I sure hope it was helpful for them. At the time, all I really knew of Linux was that I could have a fully working system without having to go to a store to buy a disk.

Since that point, I would consider myself a Linux hobbyist and enthusiast. I am a distro hopper, always trying out different distros and desktop environments, never making any one of them truly home. I’ve always had my heartstrings pulled between Ubuntu-based systems and Fedora. For some reason, I really like apt and DEB, but always loved getting faster updates from Fedora. I’ve always appreciated the way open source projects are open to the community for feedback and extra dev support, and how the code is freely available for anyone to use, reuse, and review.

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Interview with Haris Mujkic

Filed under
KDE
Interviews

Back in 2010 while learning game development and programming, I was looking for a free tool for 2D graphics. After some research, I settled with GIMP.

Krita has the most important feature for any digital artist out there. Freedom of choice. Almost every important aspect of the UI, brushes or workflow is customizable. It’s literally like my own physical studio where I can put things where they belong because it suits me. Missing something? Write a plugin.

Also, the previously mentioned Wrap Around Mode is incredibly useful and time-saving.

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Linux Foundation's Open Mainframe Project, John Mertic

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Interviews
OSS

Open Mainframe Project is supporting open source projects that are developing shared tool sets and resources. Zowe, as just one example, is a software framework that provides solutions that allow development and operations teams to securely manage, control, script and develop on the mainframe like any other cloud platform. Zowe is the first open source project based on z/OS.

Fundamentally, we want to include a new generation of developers in mainframe technology. The path to that includes leveraging open source technologies, the power of community, and actively reaching out with mentorships and other programs increase skills and awareness. The Open Mainframe Project mentorship program helps students become contributors to open source on mainframe, as well as develop the skills for a long career in technology.

Our vision is to make sure that open source on the mainframe becomes the standard for enterprise class systems and applications. This is a tall order, and we believe building a community that supports these efforts is a critical component.

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Red Hat has open source credibility: CEO Jim Whitehurst

Filed under
Red Hat
Interviews

Red Hat’s strategy remains unchanged. We are an open source software company looking to deliver open source platforms. Every line of code we have is open source—that will continue to be true going forward. In fact, even for employee contributions, IBM changed their entire contribution policy to match that of Red Hat. The logic of the deal is more around how IBM's go-to-market capability can help us scale faster. Earlier, we just didn't have the size and the scale to really be able to deliver these huge platforms for telcos, etc. IBM is working hard to better optimize their software to run on our platforms.

I think the biggest change really has happened over the last 6-7 years. Open source has grown from basically being used either by hobbyists, or vendors looking to build alternatives to traditional software, to being adopted by large IT users such as Google and Twitter and LinkedIn and Facebook—all of whom have started doing most of their own engineering work for their infrastructure and doing it with open source. Open source has also evolved from being a lower-cost alternative and something you might consider if you're a techie, to consume it if I want to innovate. So if you want to do Artificial Intelligence (AI) or Machine Learning (ML), you're going to use open source. If you're going to use cloud, you're going to use open source; if you're going to do analytics and Big Data, you're going to consume a lot of open source. That’s a fundamental switch in the minds of enterprises. In the context of developers, too, the vast majority of open source is coming from programmers paid by their employers.

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CentOS 8.0-1905

Filed under
OS
Red Hat
Interviews

CentOS is a community-run project which builds its distribution from the source code of Red Hat Enterprise Linux. The project's goal is to provide a binary compatible, nearly identical experience to Enterprise Linux, but without the commercial support provided by Red Hat. This makes CentOS an attractive option for people who want to have a distribution with long-term support and the same technology Red Hat provides, but feel they do not need vendor support. I reviewed Red Hat Enterprise Linux 8 (RHEL 8), briefly covering the distribution's installer, software and settings management, several of its Workstation features, and a few of its server technologies, such as Cockpit. I ran into several issues during that experience - some of them relating to documentation, some dealing with permission problems, some due to missing applications in the official repositories - and I was curious to see if CentOS would provide the same experience, problems and all. One could assume so given CentOS uses the same source code, but CentOS has its own website and repositories so I thought it would be worth giving it a test run and seeing what differences, if any, I could spot. In particular, I planned to focus on the strengths and weaknesses I observed in the conclusion of my RHEL 8 review.

Before I get to my experiences with CentOS 8.0.1905, I feel it is worth mentioning that CentOS is now available in two branches: CentOS Linux, the traditional, fixed release operating system based on RHEL; and CentOS Stream. The new Stream branch is described as a rolling release platform which will fit in somewhere between Fedora and RHEL. The idea appears to be that software and concepts will get their initial testing in Fedora. Then Red Hat will fork a version of Fedora to be the basis of a future RHEL release. Changes and improvements that would normally be made internally within Red Hat prior to the next RHEL will become available for the public to try and comment on in CentOS Stream. Ideally, the plan here seems to be that this will give a larger portion of the community a chance to try new ideas and report issues, giving Red Hat more feedback and a chance to polish their commercial offering.

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An Interview With Zlatan Todoric, Open-Source Developer & Former Purism CTO

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Interviews
OSS

With the early Librem 5 smartphones now shipping from their "Aspen" batch and recent Reddit discussions about the Librem 5 roping him in, former Purism CTO Zlatan Todoric has agreed to a brief interview on Phoronix.

Zlatan Todoric is no longer employed by Purism but was one of the original staff members going back to 2015 when they were primarily focused on shipping Linux laptops and then developed their privacy-minded smartphone ambitions. He's been out since September 2018 but that also means his NDA has expired. Through this he's also a Debian developer and contributor to other free software projects. So let's welcome Zlatan and the opportunity to learn more about some of the history of Purism's Linux hardware efforts.

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How I built and maintain Cantata, an open source music player

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Interviews
OSS

This is the third in a series of conversations with developers who build and maintain open source music players. Craig Drummond is the developer and maintainer of Cantata, an open source music player that acts as a frontend (client) to the Music Player Daemon (MPD) music server. I have two small headless computers at home configured as music servers—one connected to our stereo in our living room, one in my upstairs office. I first ran into Cantata while I was looking for a way to control these servers, and wow, it is one impressive piece of work.

I was interested in learning more about Cantata, so I was grateful when Craig agreed to do this interview (which has been lightly edited for length and clarity). Without further ado, let’s chat with Craig.

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