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Interviews

Why Women in Tech Can, and Should, Write a Better Resume

Filed under
Linux
Interviews

Experience with Linux is an important thing – a track record of tinkering and involvement in the open source world. Working in drivers, embedded Linux, etc. At this point companies are desperate for Linux talent. The most important thing to show is you've gotten hands-on with bits of the kernel, whichever ones are interesting to you personally. Time spent as a site reliability engineer or working in a DevOps environment is particularly attractive to employers these days, as are well rounded sys admin skills. Even if you just run Linux as your primary operating system and know how to tinker with your machine, you’re ahead of many candidates.

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Linux Foundation SysAdmin Michael Halstead's IT Career Started at Age 15

Filed under
Linux
Interviews

Michael Halstead maintains all of the public facing infrastructure for the Yocto Project, a Linux Foundation collaborative project that provides the tools and methods for building custom embedded Linux distributions. In this Q&A he describes his typical day at work, the best part of his job, how he spends his free time, and more.

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Imad Sousou: The Future of Linux and Intel in the New Connected World

Filed under
Linux
Hardware
Interviews

From new cloud platforms, to changes in virtualization and container technologies, to how data is stored and transmitted, every innovation in the data center has a Linux-based or open source component, says Imad Sousou vice president of the Software and Services Group and general manager of the Intel Open Source Technology Center at Intel.

“To a great degree... the speed with which solutions can be brought online is the result of Linux and open source in the data center,” said Sousou, who is also on the OpenStack Foundation board of directors. “The amount of collaboration around the future of the data center is very encouraging.”

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Is making your product free and open source crazy talk?

Filed under
Interviews
OSS

Making money from open source. To many in the corporate world, that seems like a contradiction in terms. How are you supposed to make money from something that you give away? they ask. It can be done. A number of companies, large and small, have done quite well in the open source space over the years.

Just ask Patrick McFadin. He’s the chief evangelist for Apache Cassandra at DataStax, a company that’s embraced the open source way. He’s also interviewed leaders at a number of successful open source companies to gain insights into what makes a successful open source business.

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Red Hat CEO Whitehurst on VMware, OpenStack and CentOS

Filed under
Red Hat
Interviews

"Open source gives us brand permission to enter a ton of categories," said Red Hat CEO Jim Whitehurst.

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This Is What It's Like To Be A Woman CEO In The Male-Dominated Open-Source Software World

Filed under
Interviews
Ubuntu

Jane Silber is the CEO of Canonical, a 650-employee software company best known for two things. Its Linux operating system, named Ubuntu, that competes with Windows and Macs, and its bold plan to take on Apple, Google, and Microsoft with soon-to-be released phones/tablets/internet TV devices.

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Automotive Grade Linux Released: An Interview With Dan Cauchy

Filed under
Linux
Interviews

On June 30, the Linux Foundation's Automotive Grade Linux (AGL) project released the first version of its open source AGL stack for in-vehicle infotainment (IVI). Based on Tizen IVI, AGL adds a stylish user interface and various applications written in HTML5 and JavaScript. The AGL stack, which is partially compatible with the somewhat similar, open source Linux GENIVI Foundation spec, supports multiple hardware architectures.

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3 ways to contribute to Firefox OS

Filed under
Linux
Interviews
Moz/FF

A Firefox OS evangelist and volunteer working as the platform's Early Feedback Community Release Manager, Kerensa will use his time on stage at this year's OSCON to wage a recruitment effort. Along with Alex Lakatos, Kerensa will present Getting Started Contributing to Firefox OS, an introduction to building applications for the operating system. Attendees will learn how Firefox OS embodies Mozilla's commitment to open web standards like HTML, CSS, and Javascript.

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Linux Foundation SysAdmin Andy Grimberg Loves New Tech and Snowboarding

Filed under
Linux
Interviews

I've been doing some form of systems administration since my freshman year in college (1994) and I've been making my living as only a sys admin since 2000...

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It's better to share with functional programming

Filed under
Interviews
OSS

Katie Miller is a Developer Advocate at Red Hat for the open source Platform as a Service, OpenShift, and co-founder of the Lambda Ladies group for women in functional programming. She has a passion for language and linguistics, but also for the open source way.

I have a Red Hat sticker on my laptop that simply says: It's better to share.

In this interview, Katie shares with me how she moved from journalism to a job in technology. Also, how she got introduced to functional programming, the Haskell programming language, and how open source is part of her daily life.

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More in Tux Machines

Security News

  • Security updates for Thursday
  • How 1.5 Million Connected Cameras Were Hijacked to Make an Unprecedented Botnet
    Last week, hackers forced a well-known security journalist to take down his site after hitting him for more than two days with an unprecedented flood of traffic. That cyberattack was powered by something the internet had never seen before: an army made of more than one million hacked Internet of Things devices. The hackers, whose identity is still unknown at this point, used not one, but two networks—commonly referred to as “botnets” in hacking lingo—made of around 980,000 and 500,000 hacked devices, mostly internet-connected cameras, according to Level 3 Communications, one of the world’s largest internet backbone providers. The attackers used all those cameras and other unsecured online devices to connect to the journalists’ website, pummeling the site with requests in an attempt to make it collapse.
  • NHS Hospitals Are Running Thousands of Computers on Unsupported Windows XP
    Hospitals across England are running thousands of out-of-date Windows XP machines, potentially putting patient data and other sensitive information at risk. Motherboard has found that at least 42 National Health Service (NHS) trusts in England are still using the Windows XP operating system, with many of them confirming that they no longer receive security updates for the software. Legal experts say that the NHS hospitals may be in breach of data protection regulations. “If hospitals are knowingly using insecure XP machines and devices to hold and otherwise process patient data they may well be in serious contravention of their obligations,” Jon Baines, Chair of the National Association of Data Protection and Freedom of Information Officers (NADPO), wrote in an email. In April 2014, Microsoft officially ended support for Windows XP, meaning that the company would no longer release security patches for the aging operating system. Any vulnerabilities discovered after that date would therefore be left for hackers to exploit. Governments and businesses could pay Microsoft for a custom extended support deal; the Crown Commercial Service, which is sponsored by the Cabinet Office, spent £5.5 million ($9 million) to continue receiving updates for the public sector, including for the NHS. That agreement ended in April 2015 and was not renewed.

Android Leftovers

Leftovers: Software

  • OVS 2.6 and The First Release of OVN
    In January of 2015, the Open vSwitch team announced that they planned to start a new project within OVS called OVN (Open Virtual Network). The timing could not have been better for me as I was looking around for a new project. I dove in with a goal of figuring out whether OVN could be a promising next generation of Open vSwitch integration for OpenStack and have been contributing to it ever since. OVS 2.6.0 has now been released which includes the first non-experimental version of OVN. As a community we have also built integration with OpenStack, Docker, and Kubernetes.
  • RcppCNPy 0.2.6
  • Markoshiki
  • gcbd 0.2.6
    A pure maintenance release 0.2.6 of the gcbd package is now on CRAN. The gcbd proposes a benchmarking framework for LAPACK and BLAS operations (as the library can exchanged in a plug-and-play sense on suitable OSs) and records result in local database. Recent / upcoming changes to DBMI and RSQLite let me to update the package; there are no actual functionality changes in this release.
  • Udisks Indicator Makes Monitoring and Mounting Drives Easy on Ubuntu
    Want to get quick, at-a-glance details about your connected drives while on Ubuntu? A new indicator applet aims to help. UDisks-Indicator is a small panel-based applet that shows disk usage information about mounted partitions.
  • Skype for Linux Alpha 1.9 released with dark theme support and more
    Microsoft today released a new update of Skype for Linux users. Skype for Linux Alpha 1.9 comes with dark theme support, the ability to mute notifications and more. Read the full change log below.
  • Open source tool uses PowerShell to enable vSphere infrastructure as code [Ed: Microsoft ‘open’ code already being used to promote proprietary software with back doors]

PostgreSQL 9.6 Released

  • PostgreSQL 9.6 released
    PostgreSQL 9.6, the latest version of the world's leading open source database, was released today by the PostgreSQL Global Development Group. This release will allow users to both scale up and scale out high performance database workloads. New features include parallel query, synchronous replication improvements, phrase search, and improvements to performance and usability, as well as many more features.
  • PostgreSQL 9.6 Officially Released With Parallel Query Support