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Interviews

Interview with Bermon Painter: On design and shutting down BlendConf

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Interviews
OSS

Make it easy for designers to contribute to your open source project by putting the landing pages and documentation on your repository. Then, then link to that repository from your main site with messaging catered to designers that encourages contributions.

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Why updating Android without vendor help is a nightmare

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Android
Interviews

The operating system runs on billions of smartphones and tablets, made by all sorts of companies. It primarily targets the ARM platform. A count can only be kept when a device is activated and many users choose not to do so.

Android is based on the Linux kernel which is released under the GNU General Public Licence version 2 and is free software; modifications can be made but if the modified binary kernel is distributed then the source needs to be made available too. All other components are released under the Apache licence, which means that there is no obligation to divulge any changes; in short, these can be locked away.

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Elementary boss watches the Linux distro make great strides

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Interviews

elementary OS is a consumer-focused, open source, Linux-based operating system with a heavy emphasis on UX design. I am the founder of elementary (the company behind elementary OS). A great deal of my time is spent organizing our team, which is mostly made up of volunteers, but I also spend time coding for both web and desktop, triaging bug reports, providing visual and UX design, and of course interacting with our users.

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The Licensing and Compliance Lab interviews Michael Zahniser of Endless Sky

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GNU
Interviews

This is the latest installment of our Licensing and Compliance Lab's series on free software developers who choose GNU licenses for their works. In this edition, we conducted an email-based interview with Michael Zahniser of Endless Sky

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Fedora project leader Matthew Miller reveals what's in store for Fedora in 2016

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Red Hat
Interviews

Fedora shook things up at the end of 2014, releasing Fedora 21 based on the “Fedora.next” initiative, which saw the project refocus itself into three distinct products for Workstation, Cloud, and Server. I recently spoke to Fedora project leader Matthew Miller to see how Fedora’s been doing since then and what’s in store for Fedora in 2016.

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Openness and transparency are keys to success for Red Hat CEO

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Red Hat
Interviews

Jim Whitehurst, president and CEO of Raleigh, North Carolina-based Red Hat, helped turn the open source software solutions business into what Forbes called “one of the world’s most innovative companies,” in 2012, 2014 and 2015. His book The Open Organization: Igniting Passion and Performance was published last year. Whitehurst took over the top job at Red Hat in 2008. Prior to that, he spent six years at Delta Air Lines, where he worked his way up to the chief operating officer position. He played an instrumental role in the airline’s financial turnaround. Before that, he worked with the Boston Consulting Group. A Columbus, Georgia native, Whitehurst earned a bachelor degree in economics and computer science from Rice University in 1989, and his master’s in business administration from Harvard University in 1994. He lives in Durham with his wife and their two children, who are twins. He spoke with Craig Dowden.

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Achieving Enterprise-Ready Container Tools With Wercker’s Open Source CLI

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Interviews
OSS

Using the Wercker Command Line Interface (CLI), developers can spin up Docker containers on their desktop, automate their build and deploy processes and then deploy them to various cloud providers, like AWS, and scheduler and orchestration platforms, such as Mesosphere and Kubernetes.

The Wercker Command Line Interface is available as an open source project on GitHub and runs on both OSX and Linux machines.

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More Torvalds TED Cov erage

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Linux
Interviews

LinuxQuestions.org: Not Your Average Linux Forum

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Linux
Interviews

For many of us, our introduction to computing is being placed in front of a machine where the only challenge is figuring out the Windows user experience paradigm. Getting started with Linux, on the other hand, requires a bit more effort, a fair amount of trial and error, and perhaps some colorful language along the way.

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Linux was not meant to be open source

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Linux
Interviews

The Linux community has a lot to shout about. In addition to a seemingly endless choice of distros to suit every taste and need, there's also the highly-prized security. This is helped to a large extent by the open source nature of Linux, but Linus Torvalds has revealed that being open source was not part of the original plan.

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Leftovers: Ubuntu, Mint, and Debian

  • End of an era: Linux distributions will soon stop supporting 32-bit PCs
    AMD and Intel released the first 64-bit CPUs for consumers back in 2003 and 2004. Now, more than a decade later, Linux distributions are looking at winding down support for 32-bit hardware. Google already took this leap back in 2015, dumping 32-bit versions of Chrome for Linux.
  • Ubuntu 16.10 Yakkety Yak Alpha 1 Released
  • Linux Mint 18 Brings Mint-Y Theme to Linux Deskto
    The Linux Mint 18 milestone release is the first major update for the popular desktop Linux distribution in 2016 and follows the Linux Mint 17.3 update that debuted in December 2015. Linux Mint 18 is based on the Ubuntu 16.04 Long Term Support (LTS) Linux distribution released April 21 and, like Ubuntu 16.04, Linux Mint 18 is being supported as an LTS, with support until the year 2021. As was the case with previous Linux Mint distribution updates, there are multiple desktop environment choices. Cinnamon 3.0, which is developed by Linux Mint and typically is the primary deployment choice for users, brings new window tiling capabilities and default effects for window transitions and actions. Additionally, Linux Mint 18 includes a new desktop theme option called Mint-Y that brings newly styled icons to users. In terms of new integrated applications, Linux Mint 18 includes the gufw application, a graphical interface for firewall configuration. In this slide show, eWEEK takes a look at some of the highlights of the Linux Mint 18.
  • My Free Software Activities in June 2016
  • Debian: Reproducible builds update

Red Hat and Fedora