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Interviews

Git Success Stories and Tips from Ceph Creator Sage Weil

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Development
Interviews

Git has changed the way that software is built -- including the Ceph open source distributed storage platform, says Ceph Creator Sage Weil. Ceph has used the Git revision control system for seven years, since it switched from SVN. It has changed the project’s work flow and how they think about code.

“Instead of thinking in files and lines, you think in flow of changes. Instead of having a single repository that everyone feeds from and into, everyone now has their own repository, their own branches. The meaning of branch changed,” said Weil, Ceph principal architect at Red Hat. “Everything just fell in place, as if the people who designed it really knew software development at scale.”

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A community distribution of OpenStack

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Red Hat
Interviews

In this interview with Red Hat's Alvaro Lopez Ortega, we learn a little bit about RDO, a community distribution of OpenStack which is designed to make it easy to install on operating systems like Fedora and CentOS. Alvaro is presenting at OpenStack Live next week, where he'll share both some technical details on RDO as well as a little bit about the community that makes it happen.

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Git Success Stories and Tips from Tor Chief Architect Nick Mathewson

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Development
Interviews
OSS

Tor, the free and open source software for anonymous web communications, has been using the Git revision control system for more than six years. The tool is so ingrained in the project's development that Director and Chief Architect Nick Mathewson's daily work flow is built around Git, he says.

“Git's the eighth version control system I've had to use, and the first one I've seriously trusted,” Mathewson said. “Many thanks to the Git developers for all their hard work.”

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Interview with Elizabeth K. Joseph of the Ubuntu Community Council

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Interviews
Ubuntu

I work as a systems administrator and frequently write and speak about my work in that role. My current position is with HP on the OpenStack Project Infrastructure where we maintain dozens of static systems that developers interface with for their work on OpenStack and a fleet of hundreds of worker servers that run all of the tests that are done against the code before it’s merged. This infrastructure is fully open source, with all of our system configurations, Puppet tooling and projects we used available via git here. Since I have a passion for both systems administration and open source, it’s been quite the dream job for me as I work with colleagues from around the world, across several companies.

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OpenDaylight Developer Spotlight: Radhika Hirannaiah

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Development
Interviews

Radhika Hirannaiah, is currently working as an intern at OpenDaylight. She received a PhD degree in Electrical Engineering from Wichita State University in 2014. Her interests include Software Defined Networking (OpenFlow, OpenDaylight etc), Voice over IP, wireless and working on open source software projects.

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Git Success Stories and Tips from Qt Maintainer Thiago Macieira

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Development
KDE
Interviews

Git has come a long way in the 10 years since Linux creator Linus Torvalds released the first version of the now-popular distributed revision control system. For example, the addition of pull requests came three years after the original release, according to Atlassian. And over time it has added more collaboration tools, code review tools, integration to continuous integration systems, and more, recalls Qt Project core maintainer and software architect at Intel, Thiago Macieira.

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The Linux Setup - Carla Schroder, OwnCloud/Writer

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Linux
Interviews

I adore Linux because I can do what I want on it. My first PC way back in 1994ish was an Apple something. It was fun, and then I got an IBM PC running Windows 3,1 and DOS 5. Windows was useless, so I spent a lot of time in DOS. Then I learned about Linux and never looked back. And Windows is still useless, and Apple is too confining. They both have their little walled gardens, and their primary purpose is lock-in and to keep selling you junk whether you want it or not, and whether or not it’s any good. They think they retain ownership of your stuff that you have purchased, which is a concept that needs to die.

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How I use Android: Android Wear Engineering Director David Singleton

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Android
Interviews

Google's own director of engineering for Android Wear gives us a glimpse at what devices he carries, how he sets up his home screens, and what apps he can't live without.

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Studying polar data with the help of Apache Tika

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Interviews
OSS

For the past 10 years, I have straddled the divide between Earth science and informatics. My PhD focused on remote sensing and snow hydrology, but I entered the world of data science and software development when faced by challenges in processing and distributing the immense amounts of data produced by my research. Fortunately, I was lucky. I had the opportunity to collaborate with a group of computer scientists at NASA/JPL who helped guide me into the world of open source software and the Apache way.

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11 Ways That Linux Contributes to Tech Innovation

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Linux
Interviews

Over the past six months I've asked new Linux Foundation corporate members on the cutting edge of technology to weigh in on what interesting or innovative trends they're witnessing and the role that Linux plays in them. Here's what engineers, CTOs, and other business leaders from companies including CoreOS, Rackspace, SanDisk, and more had to say.

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