Language Selection

English French German Italian Portuguese Spanish

Interviews

Learn KVM and Linux App Development with Linux Foundation Instructor Mike Day

Filed under
Linux
Interviews

Linux Foundation instructor Mike Day is an expert in Linux hypervisors and led IBM's work on the Xen and KVM hypervisors as a Distinguished Engineer. But he came upon his calling almost by accident, having been “thrown into the project with colleagues who had worked on hypervisors for more than a decade,” he said.

“It was a real challenge for me but not too long after that I became viewed as an expert on the subject,” said Day, who now teaches KVM and Linux developer courses for Linux Foundation Training.

Read more

Open source licensing important for future of Internet of Things

Filed under
Interviews
OSS

Open source licenses and the software programs that go along with them are critical to bringing great minds together to build great technology that spans boundaries while solving real world problems.

I believe open source licensing will continue to play a part in IoT, and I think it has to given the breadth of what IoT is all about. Today many IoT solutions are proprietary as different startups and companies investigate the technology. This is great for pushing the boundaries of what is possible, what will work, and what won't work. However, each of these proprietary solutions is created in silo of each other. They cannot communicate as there are limited standard protocols for this new generation of technology to adopt. This, by definition, ends up limiting the Internet of Things because it's now "Company A's Internet of Things that can talk to each other, but not to Company B's Internet of Things." This is commonly seen in household consumer products today. I have home lighting automation that can't speak to my home security automation that can't speak to my home TV automation.

Read more

The Creator of Linux on the Future Without Him

Filed under
Linux
Interviews

The conversation, combined with Linus Torvalds’s aggression behind the wheel, makes this sunny afternoon drive suddenly feel all too serious. Torvalds—the grand ruler of all geeks—does not drive like a geek. He plasters his foot to the pedal of a yellow Mercedes convertible with its “DAD OF 3” license plate as we rip around a corner on a Portland, Ore., freeway. My body smears across the passenger door. “There is no concrete plan of action if I die,” Torvalds yells to me over the wind and the traffic. “But that would have been a bigger deal 10 or 15 years ago. People would have panicked. Now I think they’d work everything out in a couple of months.”

Read more

Best practices to build bridges between tech teams

Filed under
Linux
Interviews

Robyn Bergeron makes life awesome for people participating in the Elasticsearch, Logstash, and Kibana communities. Passionate about improving ease of development and deployment of infrastructure and applications, she tirelessly advocates for end-users of open source projects, which why her current title is Operations Advocate at Elastic.

She has been a sysadmin, program manager, and business analyst, and has an ongoing role as mother of two stellar kids. Her most recent gig was as the Fedora Project Leader at Red Hat, where she herded cats through several releases of the Linux distribution.

Read more

Startup Offers Fully Supported Linux Laptops for Lease

Filed under
Linux
Interviews

Linux is widely used in the majority of the world’s most critical infrastructure, especially in the military and banking andfinance sectors. Ninety-eight percent of the world’s supercomputers run Linux and open source software so the value and performance is irrefutable. So our thinking was centered around bringing the same functionality, serviceability, affordability, reliability, security, agility and flexibility to businesses across the globe so that they, too, can benefit from Linux without the traditional barriers to entry. Luckily innovation in the cloud helps us see this reality come true.

Read more

How I use Android: Developer, writer, and podcaster Gina Trapani

Filed under
Android
Interviews

Gina Trapani's worn lots of different hats over the years. She founded Lifehacker and served as its inaugural editor. She hosted two different shows on the TWiT podcast network, including the informative and entertaining All About Android. And she created and continues to develop ThinkUp, a social media analysis service, along with a multiplatform to-do list app and a new service called Makerbase that promises to connect people who make cool things.

Read more

Why an open web is important for India

Filed under
Interviews
OSS

Priyanka Nag is a technical writer for Red Hat and Mozilla Rep from India. Priyanka has been contributing to open source projects for the past four years. She started by editing Wikipedia pages, and then was introduced to Mozilla during an event at her college. She says that Mozilla was love at first sight, and soon after she became a Mozillian, she was hooked on the project. Now Priyanka is also a regular speaker at community events in India. I recently caught up with Priyanka to learn more about her work in the Mozilla Community and her thoughts on the importance of the open web in India.

Read more

Interview with Lydia Pintscher: Akademy 2015 Community Keynote Speaker

Filed under
KDE
Interviews

Lydia Pintscher, our very own KDE e.V. Board President and a gem of a person; will be giving the Community Keynote Talk at Akademy 2015, in A Coruña, Spain. This is just a tiny peak into her brain for all that is in store for you in her talk.

Read more

OpenStack vs. Linux: How Do the Communities Differ? [VIDEO]

Filed under
Linux
Interviews
OSS

In the world of open-source projects, Imad Sousou, General Manager of Intel's Open Source Technology Center, sees Linux and OpenStack as the two largest projects.

Read more

SELF 2015: Linux, Guns & Barbecue

Filed under
Linux
Interviews

From what I learned talking with Jeremy Sands last Tuesday, everything about the SouthEast LinuxFest (SELF) will be marinated in southern culture. So much so that if this were twenty years ago, I’d be expecting to see geeks with cigarette packs rolled-up in the sleeves of their T shirts. But these days people don’t smoke much anymore, not even in North Carolina, a state built by tobacco money.

Read more

Syndicate content

More in Tux Machines

Raspberry Pi: New NOOBS and Raspbian releases

The Release Notes are available, and don't indicate that there are very large changes in this release, just some nice incremental updates, bug fixes, and general cleanup. There may be some interesting internal changes; we'll have to wait for the official announcement to hear about that. Read more

Tunir 0.13 is released and one year of development

I have started Tunir on Jan 12 2015, means it got more than one year of development history. At the beginning it was just a project to help me out with Fedora Cloud image testing. But it grew to a point where it is being used as the Autocloud backend to test Fedora Cloud, and Vagrant images. We will soon start testing the Fedora AMI(s) too using the same. Within this one year, there were total 7 contributors to the project. In total we are around 1k lines of Python code. I am personally using Tunir for various other projects too. One funny thing from the code commits timings, no commit on Sundays :) Read more

Andy Rubin Unleashed Android on the World. Now Watch Him Do the Same With AI

Now that Rubin had shepherded smartphones from concept to phenomenon, they no longer held much interest. As an engineering problem, they had been solved. Sure, entrepreneurs kept launching new apps, but for someone who considered engineering an art, that was like adding a few brushstrokes atop layers of dried paint. Rubin wanted to touch canvas again—and he could see a fresh one unfurling in front of him. Read more

Building a culture of more pluggable open source

If there is one word that often percolates conversations hailing the benefits of open source, it is choice. We often celebrate many of the 800+ Linux distributions, the countless desktops, applications, frameworks, and more. Choice, it would seem, is a good thing. Interestingly, choice is also an emotive thing. Read more