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Interviews

Sonic Pi uses code to compose a dance party

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Interviews
OSS

Sam Aaron is a live coder who considers programming a performance. He created Sonic Pi, an open source live coding synthesizer that lets people use code to compose and perform in classical and contemporary styles ranging from canons to dubstep. By day, Aaron works as a research associate at the University of Cambridge. By night, he codes music for people to dance to.

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Exclusive Interview: Max Ogden of HyperOS

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Interviews

HyperOS is a nifty solution for those who want to run their own containerized environment on desktops or laptops for development purpose. HyperOS supports Linux, Mac, and soon Windows and is intended to be used primarily as a end-user CLI tool on workstations. We reached out to Max Ogden who leads the development team.

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Learn to embrace open source, or get buried

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Interviews
OSS

I'll be blunt: Learn to embrace open source, or get buried. It's that simple.

Personally, I love open source. I love the ideology, I love the code, and I love the way it makes me feel to know that when I learn an open source app or operating system I can take that knowledge with me and use it anywhere for anything. That's some serious power, right there! You learn to use Photoshop, and now you're tied to $1,000 or more of software license—you might or might not be able to get an organization to buy that for you, or you might or might not have one of your own that you might or might not be able to use at any given organization. That just sucks, and I got bitten by licensing more times than I can remember in the bad old days. Now, though? Learn to use Krita or GIMP and you can take that anywhere. It's yours. Those capabilities you gained when you learned how to use it are yours. You can use them—legally—however and wherever you want to. I wish more people understood what that really represents.

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How the Internet of Things will change the way we think

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Red Hat
Interviews

Open source is already playing a very critical role. If you monitor Kickstarter for just a month, you will see numerous "startups" offering new IoT-focused hardware based on open source software and (in some cases) open source firmware.

Personally, I am happy to give a lot of the credit to the Arduino team—open source hardware and software—allowing anybody to build their first intelligent and connected sensor or actuator.

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Linux Kernel Developer Workspaces Video: Mark Brown

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GNU
Linux
Interviews

Mark Brown is the Kernel Working Group technical lead at Linaro. He is responsible for looking at anything that isn't explicitly covered by some other part of Linaro. Upstream, he maintains a few subsystems related to embedded systems -- ASoC (audio for embedded systems), regmap, regulator, and SPI -- as well as other things when he has time.

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Couchbase CEO on rise of NoSQL

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Interviews
OSS

NoSQL benefits from open source in a number of ways. Open source projects often innovate faster than proprietary projects due largely to the openness of the community. Open source communities share and spread knowledge about the use of key technologies across companies and industries. This allows NoSQL developers to leverage the contributions from many outside developers.

Open source also allows for a more natural market adoption process. NoSQL technology can be adopted much more rapidly because it can be downloaded and tried for free for exploration or small usage.

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Ada Lovelace Day: Marina Zhurakhinskaya and Outreachy

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Interviews
OSS

Working as a senior software engineer at Red Hat on the GNOME Project, I was very impressed by the talent of the project contributors, by how rewarding it is to work on free software, and by the feeling of connectedness one gets when collaborating with people all over the world. Yet, at GUADEC 2009, of approximately 170 attendees, I believe I was one of only eight women. Of the software developers working on the entire GNOME project at the time, I was one of only three.

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Open source as a tool of cultural change

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Interviews
OSS

The government is the de facto "keeper of the data" for the entire country. There's all kinds of useful data on pretty much any topic. The problem is that often, that data is stored in a way that is very difficult to discover and access. In my opinion this is primarily a workflow issue as opposed to a policy issue. Too many datasets exist as documents on a walled-off shared folder somewhere. Even sharing data with another agency is difficult, especially if it's of substantial size. Most agency networks block file sharing services like Dropbox. So, the opportunities for open data are really endless if we can change the way the government stores, creates, and releases data.

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Using open source principles to build better engineering teams

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Interviews
OSS

We become better software developers by observing how some of the best software in the world is being written. Open source has changed and will continue to change the way the world builds software, not only by creating high-quality reusable components, but by giving us a model for how to produce better software. Open source gives us complete transparency into that process.

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LinuxCon 2015 Report: Dirk Hohndel Chats with Linus Torvalds

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Linux
Interviews

For many LinuxCon attendees, one of the biggest event highlights is the opportunity to rub elbows with the people who actually write the Linux code. The only thing that can top that? Hearing from Linus Torvalds himself, the man who created it 24 years ago and still writes the code to this day.

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How I Use Android: Android Central Editor Emeritus Phil Nickinson

In the meantime, I was able to convince Phil to step out of his metaphorical kitchen for a few minutes to chat about how he uses Android in his day-to-day life. This is a man who has seen and used practically every Android device over the past several years, after all -- and a fair number of apps and customization tools, to boot. So what devices does someone with so much knowledge carry around in his own trousers, and how does he make the most of what they have to offer? Enough with the suspense already. In his own words, this is how Phil Nickinson uses Android. Read more

Best Android Phones Under 5.7 Inches

There's no question that Samsung hit a home run with its Galaxy S7 line. We already think the smaller GS7 is the best phone under 5.2 inches, and the larger, curved-screen Galaxy S7 edge is our pick for the best phone under 5.7 inches. Why? It takes everything we love about the smaller phone and makes it bigger — but not too much. Read more

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