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Interviews

How Kubernetes is helping Docker blossom

Filed under
Server
Interviews
OSS

Kubernetes and Docker are the latest buzz words in the IT sector. Businesses and IT enthusiasts alike are clamoring to learn more about containerization.

I managed to grab Red Hat software analyst Jason Brooks, who will be speaking at SCaLE 14x about Kubernetes, to ask him a few questions about the software and container movement.

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Young maker talks software defined radio, open source, and mentors

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Interviews
OSS

Schuyler St. Leger is one of the superheroes of the maker movement. He's a speaker, young maker, and was featured in Make magazine. His famous presentation, Why I love my 3-D Printer has received over 300,000 views on YouTube.

Schuyler is keynoting at SCaLE 14x, where he'll talk about open source radio and how it's impacting the world around us. We're surrounded by radios in smartphones, tablets, laptops, and Wi-Fi access points, yet we often fail to realize their ubiquitous presence. The airwaves are a fantastic space for exploration, but where do we begin? Open source radio combined with open hardware is a rich space for exploration and experimentation.

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Using strace to track system calls in Linux

Filed under
Linux
Interviews

Strace is a tool used to intercept system calls from your application to the Linux kernel. I find strace is invaluable for system administrators for two main reasons.

First off, we do not always have the source code of an application available, but we may still need to know what an application is doing. This can be anything from which files are opened, how much memory is being allocated or even why an application is crashing repeatedly.
Secondly, even if we do have the code, being a system administrator doesn't imply being a developer. We may not know how to follow the code. I find that looking at system calls as opposed to lines of code is a bit more descriptive

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ScyllaDB: Cassandra compatibility at 1.8 million requests per node

Filed under
Linux
Interviews
OSS

I have been involved with Linux and open source since the mid-1990s, and Scylla is a natural progression for open source to move up the stack and provide more value for some of the most demanding companies out there. The problems involved in running a resilient database are some of the hardest and most valuable in IT today.

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3 smart GIMP tricks

Filed under
GNU
Interviews

Honestly, I think a lot of the people claiming GIMP isn't as good as Photoshop are people who have invested a lot in learning Photoshop and want an excuse not to learn a new and different tool. If the GIMP team spent much time trying to make everything just like Photoshop, they'd never have time to implement great new features.

It's true there are some nice features Photoshop has that GIMP doesn't. Some are being addressed for GIMP 3.0, like high-color images. A lot of people will be very happy to see that. Other features, like non-destructive editing and CMYK, are still wish-list items that will have to wait until later.

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Linux Foundation Scholarship Recipient: Vaishali Thakkar

Filed under
Linux
Interviews

The Linux Foundation’s Training Scholarship Program has awarded 34 scholarships totaling more than $100,000 in free training to students and professionals during the past five years. In this series, we are featuring recent scholarship recipients with the hope of inspiring others.

Vaishali Thakkar is a scholarship recipient in the Kernel Guru category. She lives in India and recently completed an Outreachy internship on project Coccinelle. The goal of her project was replacing out-of-date API uses and deprecated functions and macros in the Linux kernel with more modern equivalents. She began contributing to the Linux kernel almost a year ago, and her first contribution was running a Coccinelle semantic patch over staging directory files. She says the excitement of having that first patch accepted was amazing, and she hopes some day to have her dream job of “Linux Kernel Engineer.”

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More kernel/Linux: Linux Update Improves Processor Support

Participate in the 2016 ODL User Survey

Brian Proffitt: How do you Fedora?

Filed under
Red Hat
Interviews

Brian has been involved with Linux for a long time. In the summer of 1999, he was asked to write a book about Sun StarOffice 5.1 for Linux. This was a challenge for Brian as he had never run Linux before. “I got a hold of a Caldera OpenLinux CD set and installed it on a friend’s spare PC.” He was hooked on Linux when he was able to play an in-memory game of Tetris while the operating system was being installed.

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Open source communities need mentors

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Interviews
OSS

To me it seems a natural pairing because they are two things I am passionate about and things that I do and use every single day. So many of the principles of open source correlate with the positive outcomes most desired for children: collaboration, participation, and transparency (honesty, integrity, openness). For children who are interested in how things work, open source software can give them that behind-the-scenes peek. I love teaching children about open source because there are so many ways they can get their hands dirty and get involved in communities and meet people who share their particular interests. There are many projects that were developed with children in mind, like the great work done by Sugar Labs.

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Exclusive Interview with Console OS CEO Regarding Ongoing Feud with Android-x86

Filed under
Android
Interviews

Last week we published an article regarding the ongoing feud between the Android-x86 and Console OS projects, and it looks like there is an intense debate in the community. Since we already know what the Android-x86 leader thinks, we also had a talk with the CEO of Console OS Inc. to get his side of the story.

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Interview: Jono Bacon

Filed under
Interviews
OSS

He’s the Pharaoh of community management, but what led him to switch from Ubuntu to the millionaire philanthropic prize fund, XPRIZE?

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More in Tux Machines

GNOME 3.25.3 Released, GTK Development

  • GNOME 3.25.3 Now Available
    GNOME 3.25.3 is now available as the latest stepping stone towards September's release of GNOME 3.26.
  • GNOME 3.26 Desktop Environment Development Continues, New Milestone Is Out Now
    Matthias Clasen has informed the community via an email announcement that the third milestone of the upcoming GNOME 3.26 desktop environment is now ready for public testing. After a one day delay, GNOME 3.25.3 is now available, and it's the third development release of the upcoming GNOME 3.26 desktop environment that could be used by default in popular GNU/Linux distributions, such as the Ubuntu 17.10 (Artful Aardvark) or Fedora 27, both due for release later this year. It brings a bunch of updates and new features to several of its components and apps.
  • Eight years since first release and still no usable theme?
    Well, let me be frank. Ever since gtk-3.0 I've been skeptical of it, especially of the theming aspect. In gtk-2 we had (and still have) many themes ranging from trash to excellent, almost every kind of taste could have been satisfied. Not so in gtk-3. First issue is constant changes to theming API, meaning that despite there being hundreds of themes, only handful of them actually work right :( And among them, I still have yet to find one that would work on my fairly usual 15,6″ laptop screen with 1366×768 px resolution. Basicaly I have two issues.

Microsoft Dirty Tricks and Entryism

Security: Windows Causes Chaos, Routers With Back Doors, Patching of UNIX/Linux

  • Traffic lights in Australia hit by WannaCry ransomware [Ed: Well, who uses Microsoft Windows to manage traffic?!?!]

    Radio station 3aw reports that dozens of pole based traffic calming measures are infected and that this came as a surprise to the local minister and Road Safety Camera Commissioner when radio reporters told him about it.

  • Honda shuts down factory after finding NSA-derived Wcry in its networks
    The WCry ransomware worm has struck again, this time prompting Honda Company to halt production in one of its Japan-based factories after finding infections in a broad swath of its computer networks, according to media reports. The automaker shut down its Sayama plant northwest of Tokyo on Monday after finding that WCry had affected networks across Japan, North America, Europe, China, and other regions, Reuters reported Wednesday. Discovery of the infection came on Sunday, more than five weeks after the onset of the NSA-derived ransomware worm, which struck an estimated 727,000 computers in 90 countries. The mass outbreak was quickly contained through a major stroke of good luck. A security researcher largely acting out of curiosity registered a mysterious domain name contained in the WCry code that acted as a global kill switch that immediately halted the self-replicating attack.
  • GhostHook: CyberArk finds new way to attack Windows 10

    Researchers at CyberArk Labs have discovered a new way of gaining access to the innards of Windows 10 64-bit systems that can bypass existing safeguards, including the kernel patch protection known as PatchGuard that Microsoft developed to improve system security.

  • John McAfee claims 'every router in America has been compromised' by hackers and spies

    Technology pioneer John McAfee believes that every home internet router in America is wide open to cyberattacks by criminal hackers and intelligence agencies. He makes the claim speaking after revelations from WikiLeaks that the Central Intelligence Agency (CIA) targets the devices.

  • 'Stack Clash' Smashed Security Fix in Linux
    What's old is new again: an exploit protection mechanism for a known flaw in the Linux kernel has fallen to a new attack targeting an old problem.
  • Continuous defence against open source exploits
    Register for next month's expo for the public sector DevOps community to hear key speakers from the front line of public sector digital transformation and see the latest technologies at first hand. Andrew Martin, DevOps lead in a major government department, has been added to the line-up of speakers to talk about the importance of getting the approach to security right with open source software.
  • IoT goes nuclear: creating a ZigBee chain reaction [iophk: "use 6lowpan instead"]

    If plugging in an infected bulb is too much hassle, the authors also demonstrate how to take over bulbs by war-driving around in a car, or by war-flying a drone.

  • Passengers given a freight as IT glitch knocks out rail ticket machines

    The network of machines are operated by the individual franchises, but share a common infrastructure from German software company Scheidt and Bachmann.

OpenBSD Development News

  • OpenBSD now has Trapsleds to make life harder for ROPers
  • Historical: My first OpenBSD Hackathon

    I was a nobody. With some encouragement, enough liquid courage to override my imposter syndrome, and a few hours of mentoring, I'm now doing big projects. The next time you're sitting at a table with someone new to your field, ask yourself: how can you encourage them? You just might make the world better.

    Thank you Dale. And thank you Theo.

  • Finish the link-kit job
    We've had the linkkit components in the tree for a while, but it has taken nearly 20 rounds between rpe/tb/myself to get the last few bits finished. So that the link kit is cleanly used at reboot, but also fits in with the practices kernel developers follow.