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Interviews

Watch: Mark Shuttleworth Talks About Telco and NFV Technologies

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Interviews
Ubuntu

The Movilforum website had the great pleasure of interviewing Mark Shuttleworth, CEO of Canonical and founder of the world's most popular free operating system, Ubuntu Linux.

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Red Hat Interviews

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Red Hat
Interviews
  • Red Hat Goes All-In for Containers With 2 New Offerings

    Paul Cormier, Red Hat EVP and president of products and technologies, discusses two new products announced today at the Red Hat Summit.

  • Red Hat technologist talks NFV innovations and an open source world

    Chris Wright, chief technologist for Red Hat, sat down with theCUBE cohosts Dave Vellante and Stu Miniman to discuss new developments in the open source world and NVF in telcom networks.

    As the person who helps define Red Hat’s strategic vision, Wright has seen conversations shift from cost of ownership to innovation. “Today, there is a shift to operationalize complex systems,” he says. “There has been a change in open source technology from commoditization to a place where real innovation is happening, and new services are introduced quickly.”

Interview with winner of the Red Hat Women in Open Source Community Award, Sarah Sharp

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Linux
Red Hat
Interviews
OSS

Last year Red Hat announced its first Women in Open Source Award, created to recognize the contributions that women are making in open source technologies and communities. I was honored to be on one of the committees that reviewed more than 100 nominations and narrowed the list down to 10 finalists divided into two categories: community and academic. Then the open source community voted, and I anxiously awaited the results. I wanted every woman on both lists to win, so I knew that no matter who ended up with most votes, I'd be happy.

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Interview with winner of Red Hat's Women in Open Source Academic Award, Kesha Shah

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Red Hat
Interviews
OSS

As an open source contributor, I began as a newbie and grew into a decent contributor thanks to working on many great projects. Today, I am mentoring new contributors on how to make their first contributions to open source. So, I think I can answer this question more elaborately.

Open source organizations have projects that need contributions from everyone, from all skills and levels of expertise. There are many non-coding ways too contribute as well, like: reporting issues, writing documentation, helping with design, trying previous versions, checking quality and translation, outreach for a product, and organizing events. Doing so helps you learn more about the open source project as well as to network with the community while adding positive contributions.

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Env and Stacks Elections Interview with Václav Pavlín (vpavlin)

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Red Hat
Interviews

I started as a package maintainer helping with initscrpits, systemd and other packages. Then I moved up the stack to work on containers which lead me to helping with defining Fedora Docker base image and getting a membership in Base WG and Env&Stacks WG to help with Docker integration. Currently, I am working on a composite multi-container application specification called Nulecule.

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Interview with Gervase Markham of Mozilla

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Interviews
Moz/FF

I’ve been with Mozilla, as a volunteer or employee, since 2000. I got involved when I read a Slashdot comment (!) from an existing Mozilla contributor called Matthew Thomas. It said that if Mozilla failed, then Microsoft would get control of the web. I thought that the web was too awesome, even then, to be controlled by a single company, so I decided to help Mozilla out. Sixteen years later, I’m still here. I’ve done many things in my time, but I currently work mainly on Public Policy, which I tend to summarise as "persuading governments not to make unhelpful laws about the Internet". My current focus is copyright reform in the EU; you can read our policy positions on the Mozilla Policy blog.

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Interview with Mikeal Rogers: Node.js fork that ended up as a giant, unifying step forward

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Development
Linux
News
Interviews

Node.js is the software that allows you to run Javascript to create amazingly powerful server-side applications by using Google's V8 Javascript Engine.

Red Hat CEO: 'A large percentage of the Fortune 500 will be left behind'

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Red Hat
Interviews

Whitehurst used the auto industry as an example where the old brands must change, or else face trouble ahead. Automakers have been focused for the last 100 years on how to make cars more cheaply, and management has been the same way, focused on how to control employees most effectively, Whitehurst said.

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Also: Here’s Why UBS Group AG (USA) Is Bullish On Red Hat Inc Stock

Stock Update – Red Hat, Inc. (NYSE:RHT)

What to Expect When Red Hat (RHT) Reports Earnings Thursday

CA Technologies Named a Red Hat Innovation Award Winner for Application Development

Learn KVM and Linux App Development with Linux Foundation Instructor Mike Day

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Linux
Interviews

Linux Foundation instructor Mike Day is an expert in Linux hypervisors and led IBM's work on the Xen and KVM hypervisors as a Distinguished Engineer. But he came upon his calling almost by accident, having been “thrown into the project with colleagues who had worked on hypervisors for more than a decade,” he said.

“It was a real challenge for me but not too long after that I became viewed as an expert on the subject,” said Day, who now teaches KVM and Linux developer courses for Linux Foundation Training.

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Open source licensing important for future of Internet of Things

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Interviews
OSS

Open source licenses and the software programs that go along with them are critical to bringing great minds together to build great technology that spans boundaries while solving real world problems.

I believe open source licensing will continue to play a part in IoT, and I think it has to given the breadth of what IoT is all about. Today many IoT solutions are proprietary as different startups and companies investigate the technology. This is great for pushing the boundaries of what is possible, what will work, and what won't work. However, each of these proprietary solutions is created in silo of each other. They cannot communicate as there are limited standard protocols for this new generation of technology to adopt. This, by definition, ends up limiting the Internet of Things because it's now "Company A's Internet of Things that can talk to each other, but not to Company B's Internet of Things." This is commonly seen in household consumer products today. I have home lighting automation that can't speak to my home security automation that can't speak to my home TV automation.

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More in Tux Machines

Example Uses Of The Linux grep Command

The Linux grep command is used as a method for filtering input. GREP stands for Global Regular Expression Printer and therefore in order to use it effectively you should have some knowledge about regular expressions. In this article I am going to show you a number of examples which will help you understand the grep command. Read more

Red Hat encourages open source adoption at Asia Pacific Forum in Philippines

Red Hat, Inc. yesterday hosted the Red Hat Forum Asia Pacific in Manila, the Philippines. The conference provided an outlet for local businesses to discuss and learn about open source technology innovations, successes, and best practices. With this year’s theme, “Energize Your Enterprise,” the Red Hat Forum focused on the IT solutions enterprises are using to help innovate and transform the way business is done. In addition to Red Hat’s technology vision keynote, speakers covered a range of topics, from containers to the Internet of Things (IoT). Read more

today's leftovers

  • Readers Say ‘No’ to Antivirus on Linux
    A few weeks back when Ken Starks wrote an anecdotal column on an experience with a false positive from Avast antivirus on GNU/Linux, we started thinking. We run antivirus on our LAMP servers with the intent of protecting poor suckers on Windows, but on our Linux desktops and laptops? Pretty much, no. Some of us had tried the open source ClamAV at one time or another, mainly out of curiosity, but none of us had stuck with it. To our knowledge, until Starks wrote his column none of us even knew anybody who had ever run proprietary AV on Linux boxes.
  • openSUSE Tumbleweed – Review of the week 2016/4 & 5
  • Almost weekend again – what’s in store
    I updated my packages for calibre and chromium with new versions. I updated the set of “compat32” packages for a multilib setup on slackware64-current to match the Slackware packages contained in the new Slackware 14.2 Beta 2.
  • Slackware 14.2 Beta 2 Announced
    Good news for everyone. Slackware 14.2 is getting close to release as Pat now announced Slackware 14.2 Beta 2 on the latest changelog. This update also brings some security changes for all supported Slackware releases back to Slackware 13.0!!!
  • Make a $40 Linux or Android PC with this tiny new Raspberry Pi 2 rival
    If you want to build a powerful $40 Linux or Android PC with 4K video support, consider Hardkernel’s Odroid-C2 computer. The developer board is an uncased computer like the popular Raspberry Pi 2, which sells for $35. But South Korea-based Hardkernel claims Odroid-C2 has more horsepower than its popular rival and can be a desktop replacement.

Kernel Space: Linux, Graphics

  • Unikernels
    When Linux applications have bugs that are difficult to diagnose (EG buffer overruns that happen in production and can’t be reproduced in a test environment) there are a variety of ways of debugging them. Tools such as Valgrind can analyse memory access and tell the developers which code had a bug and what the bug does. It’s theoretically possible to link something like Valgrind into a Unikernel, but the lack of multiple processes would make it difficult to manage.
  • Robert Hallock: GPUOpen is AMD’s Long-Term Open Source Strategy
    Last week AMD completed a major step in its initiative to open things up to the public under GPUOpen — a collection of tools for graphics, high performance compute and heterogeneous computing – as open source under the MIT license model. So when a company does something out of the ordinary, especially one with a large indirect influence in the mobile community, it’s worth looking further into it. I recently had the opportunity to speak with Robert Hallock, AMD’s Head of Global Technical Marketing, and ask a few questions about what this all means.
  • A Ton Of Direct3D 9 "Nine" State Tracker Improvements Hit Mesa
  • xf86-video-geode 2.11.18
    Yesterday, I pushed out version 2.11.18 of the Geode X.Org driver. This is the driver used by the OLPC XO-1 and by a plethora of low-power desktops, micro notebooks and thin clients. This release mostly includes maintenance fixes of all sorts. Of noticeable interest is a fix for the long-standing issue that switching between X and a VT would result in a blank screen (this should probably be cherry-picked for distributions running earlier releases of this driver). Many thanks to Connor Behan for the fix!