Language Selection

English French German Italian Portuguese Spanish

Interviews

Oregon State University Open Source Lab hosts 160 projects

Filed under
Interviews
OSS

The South California Linux Expo (SCALE) is an annual event aiming to provide educational opportunities on the topic of open source software. This is SCALE13X, and prior to the event I caught up with one of the speakers, Emily Durham, who will give a talk called Human Hacking.

Emily Dunham of Open Source Lab at OSUEmily is currently finishing her final year in computer science at Oregon State University (OSU), where she is the student systems engineer at the OSU Open Source Lab. Previous to that gig at OSU, she helped run the Robotics Club, Linux Users Group, and Security Club. Emily has 7 years of experience in open source communities, and I talked with her regarding her career and life, open hardware, community psychology, and of course, her upcoming talk at SCALE13X.

Read more

Puppet Labs community manager on setting expectations

Filed under
Interviews

The other side of community involvement in an open source project is the end users. It's hard to be a successful open source project if no one is using it! But aside from providing documentation and forums, how else can projects and users connect?

Kara Sowles, community manager for Puppet LabsOne way is a users group, a type of club where the members all share an interest in a particular arena. SHARE is one of the oldest computer users group around. The basic idea behind a users group is to provide more resources and share information among a local cell, provide support, encouragement, new ideas, mailing lists, and more. There are some challenges with belonging to a users group, managing a users group, and representing your open source project in a users group.

Read more

AllSeen Alliance Senior Director Philip DesAutels: The Full Promise of IoT Lies in Open Source

Filed under
Interviews
OSS

The Internet of Things is already a reality -- thousands of devices, from home appliances and consumer electronics, to smartwatches and cars already connect to the Internet. The problem is that they don't easily, or simply can't, connect to each other to form an Internet of Everything, says Philip DesAutels, senior director of IoT at the AllSeen Alliance, a Linux Foundation Collaborative Project.

Read more

Also: The AllSeen Alliance’s Philip DesAutels on the Internet of Things

Fed up with systemd and Linux? Why not try PC-BSD?

Filed under
Interviews
BSD

With the growing adoption of systemd, dissatisfaction with Linux has reached proportions not seen in recent years, to the extent that people have started talking of switching to FreeBSD.

Read more

Exclusive: Seafile Founder Daniel Pan Talks About His Open Source Cloud Software

Filed under
Linux
Interviews
OSS

Cloud has become one of the buzzwords in modern computing; there are so many advantages of cloud that it can’t be ignored. It is becoming an integral part of our IT infrastructure. However cloud poses a serious threat to the ownership of data and raises many privacy-related questions. The best solution is to ‘own’ your cloud, either though an on-premise cloud running in a local network disconnected from the Internet or one running on your own secure server. Seafile is one of the most promising, open source-based cloud projects.

Read more

The New Stack Makers: Alex Polvi and What Comes with High Availability, Portability and Containers

Filed under
Server
Interviews

Alex Williams: Alex, you have been developing CoreOS, and it has really been on a tear over the past several months. We’re going to talk a little bit about what you’re doing, but also I want to learn more about who is Alex Polvi? How did you get started in programming? Were you in grade school? Were you at middle school?

Read more

Facebook’s James Pearce: Open Source Creates More Quality Code

Filed under
Interviews
OSS

Facebook has always used and contributed back to open source software. But over the past few years the company has become much more active in the open source community, releasing more of its own internal tools and participating in upstream development on the Linux kernel and many other projects. As a result, the company can more easily attract and retain developers, has increased code quality, and sees faster innovation, says James Pearce, head of open source at Facebook.

Read more

The Linux Setup - Jonathan Riddell, Kubuntu Developer

Filed under
KDE
Interviews

I’m all for free-as-in-freedom. Because of the number of interfaces that software has with the world (both human and programmer), it’s very easy to lock people into proprietary software and create monopolies. Not having free competition is a bad way for any economy to run. I’m surprised at how infrequently this economic argument is made.

I’m also all for community-made software. It allows us to have control and fix problems that we find, to share knowledge, and to create professional and personal relationships. I love that I can go to almost any city in the world and meet up with someone who wants to chat about the code we work with.

Read more

Interview with Lucas Falcão

Filed under
KDE
Interviews

I think Krita is doing great and I really like the direction it’s going, the software it seems to be made for artists, at least I have this impression when I use the tools to work on the creation and painting of textures. I don’t hate anything in Krita, and I don’t use all the tools, but I think usability could always be improved.

Read more

‘Enterprise customers are now more willing to implement open source’

Filed under
Red Hat
Interviews
OSS

Jim Whitehurst expects India to play a larger role in NYSE-listed Red Hat’s global strategy, thanks to the rapid pace of infrastructure creation.

“When a new system’s put into place, it’s increasingly likely that it may be built on open source. We like places where there is a lot of infrastructure going in,” Whitehurst, President and Chief Executive Officer, Red Hat, said. Red Hat is the world’s largest commercial distributor of the open source-based Linux operating system. Open source denotes software for which the original source code is made freely available and may be redistributed and modified. In an interaction with BusinessLine, Whitehurst throws light on the opportunities in the Indian marketplace for open source. He also explains why the company is keen to increasingly move more support functions to India.

Read more

Syndicate content

More in Tux Machines

Standardisation process should be open, study shows

Organisations setting ICT standards should be open, as this improves their standards and contributes to their implementation in software, concludes a group of Swedish researchers. “Standards get better with contributions coming from individuals and organisations,” says Jonas Gamalielsson, lead author of a paper published in June. Read more

Open source runs Croatia’s geospatial services platforms

Croatia’s Ministry of Environment and Nature Protection has become one of the country’s major users of open source solutions. The software is making possible two geospatial service platforms on biodiversity and environmental protection, unveiled in May. Read more

today's leftovers

  • Three months with a Chromebook computer
    Chromebooks have become incredibly popular among some users, as you can see from Amazon's list of bestselling Chromebooks. One user decided to use a Chromebook as his primary computing device for three months, and found that it worked extremely well for him. [...] Debian Linux is known as a distribution that supports lots of different hardware, but now the Debian developers have announced the removal of support for the SPARC hardware architecture.
  • New Target for Mobile App Devs: Plasma Mobile on Linux
  • New Plasma Mobile, New Security Issues
    Jonathan Riddell said the hacking was frustrating at first, but Martin Gräßlin was able to get the system going with Wayland and KWin. Gräßlin said Plasma Mobile is the first product to use Wayland by default and the only reason Wayland is mature enough to be included as a technical preview in upcoming Plasma 5.4. They're confident Android apps will run on it at some point as well.
  • KDE Creates Plasma Mobile, A KDE Based Operating System For Mobile Phones
    As you may know, the KDE developers have created Plasma Phone UI, a Linux based operating based on Ubuntu Touch and Kubuntu Linux. The OS is open-source, has an user-friendly interface and provides a customizable platform for mobile devices. For now, KDE’s mobile OS is just a prototype and can be tested on the LG Nexus 5.
  • GSoC ’15 Post #5: Port Complete – Time for the Real Deal
    With loads of help from people on #kde-devel, we finally managed to complete the KDE Network Filesharing port to KF5. Wasn’t easy, given that this was my first time porting frameworks, but it was real fun. Apart from apol’s blogpost shared in my last post, here’s another post that was immensely helpful to me while porting: Porting a KControl Module to KF5.
  • Gnome Pie 0.6.3 (Circular Application Launcher) Brings New Features And Bug-Fixes
    As you may know, Gnome Pie is a circular application launcher, enabling the users to easily access their favorite apps, which they have added to the pie. For usage information, see this link.
  • Gnome 3.18 Will Include A News Reader App
  • ExLight Distro Brings Enlightenment 0.19.7 and Linux Kernel 4.0 to Ubuntu 15.04
    On July 26, Arne Exton, the creator of numerous distributions of GNU/Linux as well as various Android-x86 Live DVDs, was more than proud to announce the immediate availability for download of a new build for his ExLight Linux distribution.
  • OpenSUSE Leap 42 Will Be An OpenSUSE Flavor For The Users That Need A Stable System
  • Very slow ssh logins on Fedora 22
    I’ve recently set up a Fedora 22 firewall/router at home (more on that later) and I noticed that remote ssh logins were extremely slow. In addition, sudo commands seemed to stall out for the same amount of time (about 25-30 seconds).
  • Debian Dropping SPARC Support
    While Debian supports many CPU architectures, it's working to remove support for the Sun/Oracle SPARC architecture. As of this weekend, Debian has dropped SPARC from their unstable, experimental, and jessie-updates archives.
  • Ubuntu Touch OTA-5 Update Brings Double Battery Life On Meizu MX4 Ubuntu Edition
  • Ubuntu Phone Gets Blasted In Reviews This Week
  • 3.5-inch SBC runs Yocto on Braswell and 6 Watts
    Aaeon’s Yocto Linux ready, 3.5-inch “GENE-BSW5″ SBC offers Intel Braswell CPUs, dual GbE ports, six serial ports, and mini-PCIe, SATA, and mSATA expansion.
  • Not Learning Unix is a Mistake
    It has occurred to me that not learning Unix is a grave mistake. My relatively early exposure to Unix was important. I may not have appreciated Linux as much or even at all if I hadn't had that ability to experiment at home with Xenix. Learning about Unix develops new mental muscles like playing a musical instrument or learning a new language. But learning these new processes becomes more difficult with age. To me the exact technical details are less important. It does not really matter if you are a Linux user or if you use one of the BSDs or even something more exotic like Plan 9. The important thing is you can learn new concepts from what I will broadly refer to as the Unix/Internet Community.
  • Mmm, what's that smell, Google+? Yes it's death: Google unhooks 'social network' from YouTube
    Google is no longer forcing Google+ on the world: people will be able to log into YouTube, and other Googley services, without having to create mandatory Google+ profiles. From now on, only those who deliberately sign up for Google+ will create profiles on the ghost town of a social network. Previously, Google harassed users of YouTube, Gmail and so on, to convert their accounts into Google+ accounts, a move obviously designed to boost G+'s sad numbers. It didn't go down very well at all – a lot of folks hated it.
  • Google to block access to unofficial autocomplete API
    Google has decided the autocomplete API it informally offers will no longer be available for “unauthorised” users as of August 10th.

Leftovers: Software