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Interviews

Misc. Shows and Screencasts

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Interviews
  • 10/03/2019 | Linux Headlines

    PostgreSQL 12 is here with performance gains and more, Google plans to phase out mixed security content in Chrome, and a new funding source for The Document Foundation.

  • The Coffee Shop Problem | TechSNAP 413

    We peer into the future with a quick look at quantum supremacy, debate the latest DNS over HTTPS drama, and jump through the hoops of HTTP/3.

    Plus when to use WARP, the secrets of Startpage, and the latest Ryzen release.

  • LHS Episode #306: The Weekender XXXV

    It's time once again for The Weekender. This is our bi-weekly departure into the world of amateur radio contests, open source conventions, special events, listener challenges, hedonism and just plain fun. Thanks for listening and, if you happen to get a chance, feel free to call us or e-mail and send us some feedback. Tell us how we're doing. We'd love to hear from you.

  • Command Line Heroes season 3, episode 8: The C Change

    C and UNIX are at the root of modern computing. Many of the languages we've covered this season are related to or at least influenced by C. But UNIX and C only happened because a few developers at Bell Labs created both as a skunkworks project.

  • Reality 2.0 – Destroy This Podcast

    Katherine Druckman, Doc Searls, and Petros Koutoupis talk about ownership, freedom, and convenience in the digital world.

  • Lubuntu 19.10 Beta Run Through

    In this video, we are looking at Lubuntu 19.10 Beta. 

Audiocasts/Shows: FLOSS Weekly, BSD Now, Linux Headlines, Linux in the Ham Shack and TLLTS

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Interviews
  • FLOSS Weekly 549: PostgreSQL

    PostgreSQL, also known as Postgres, is a free and open-source relational database management system emphasizing extensibility and technical standards compliance. It is designed to handle a range of workloads, from single machines to data warehouses or Web services with many concurrent users.

  • The TrueNAS Library | BSD Now 318

    DragonFlyBSD vs. FreeBSD vs. Linux benchmark on Ryzen 7, JFK Presidential Library chooses TrueNAS for digital archives, FreeBSD 12.1-beta is available, cool but obscure X11 tools, vBSDcon trip report, Project Trident 12-U7 is available, a couple new Unix artifacts, and more.

  • 10/02/2019 | Linux Headlines

    Nextcloud goes pro, the self-proclaimed "Steam replacement" reaches version 1, and Microsoft drops some far-out future tech.

    Plus Linux app throttling is in the works for Chrome OS.

  • LHS Episode #305: Morning Mink

    Welcome to Episode 305 of Linux in the Ham Shack. In this episode, the hosts discuss the Amazon being invasive (no, really!), amateur radio in France, Australia and space, artificial intelligence multi-SDR boards and much more. Thank you for listening and we hope you have a great week.

  • The Linux Link Tech Show Episode 828

    ubuntu 19.10, 3d printing, streaming, good stuff

How I ditched my old OS and jumped into Linux

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OS
Linux
Interviews

About a year ago, I came across an article on Twitter, Ditching Windows: 2 Weeks With Ubuntu Linux On The Dell XPS 13, by Jason Evangelho, a long-time Forbes tech writer. Here was a person who was clearly fired up from his recent experience using Linux. He had recently been sent a laptop running Windows 10 for evaluation and, in the middle of a large file transfer, the machine restarted without warning. Not only did he lose time on the file transfer, but the machine displayed the "blue screen of death" most Windows users are familiar with.

That was the tipping point for Jason and the beginning of his journey to adopt Linux, which I have been following with interest this past year through his Twitter feed and columns on Forbes. In July, he started Linux for Everyone, a weekly podcast that is chock-full of great content and interviews about Linux. I contacted him recently to learn more about his work.

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Open Source technology is not secure is untrue and a myth: Manish Gupta of Liferay

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Interviews
OSS
Security

The era when open source technologies were considered as snowflakes is fading out. Just about 5 years ago there was a sense of scepticism from both businesses and investors end in investing time and money on open-source models. These models have now proved and earned their right place against the Proprietary technologies/businesses. The community developers understood and believed that they can collaborate and bring in (or disrupt) software which can be accessed, improved and enhanced as time moves on. This leads us to the era of open source technology which is now a collaborative space.

Thanks to the first generation of open source software companies like Windows, Linux, Red hat who started the revolution by building the software with the help of collaborative developer’s community. To overcome the challenges faced by the first generation (low revenue generation and asynchronous collaboration), the second generation was started back by companies like Yahoo, Cloudera, Hortonworks to name a few. They followed the in-house development (instead of a collaborative community of developers) of the software and also they made some part of the software chargeable under a commercial license to combat the low-profit generation from software support services. This generation faced downsides in terms of high competition. The USP game became the most important factor in winning or losing clientele and business.

Now, we are in the third generation of open source technologies where we have worked on the challenges faced by the later generations. Now the in-house developers build 80-90 percent of the software leaving the rest to the clients who can shape and reshape as per their needs and requirements over the platform. Most importantly businesses are tapping into software as a cloud service model.

Open source technology can be rightly termed as a disruptive innovation. There is a shift of cost centre from operating cost (licensing) to capital expenditure (expense for customisation and in-house implementation). Most importantly and going by the data, open-source software has proved to produce better quality implementations than proprietary counterparts. We are following the best practices like Agile and Scrum, which improves the workflow and brings in rapid and more frequent development and release cycles without sacrificing time and quality.

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Audiocasts/Shows: Linux Action News, GNU World Order and Open Source Security Podcast

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Interviews
  • Linux Action News 125

    CentOS Stream and 8 have quite a bit for us to talk about, Docker’s struggles go public, and the GNOME Foundation is facing a patent fight.

    Plus the best bit of Android 10 Go, Microsoft gives serious thought to bringing Edge to Linux, and Stallman’s role at GNU comes into question.

  • GNU World Order 13x40

    Is an open source operating system important?

  • Open Source Security Podcast: Episode 163 - Death to python 2

    Josh and Kurt about the upcoming Python 2 EOL. What does it mean, why does it matter, and what you can you do?

Audiocasts/Shows: Nathan Wolf's Noodlings, Purism's New Video of the Librem 5, TLLTS and Jupiter's Latest Podcasts

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Interviews
  • Nathan Wolf: Noodlings | MX Linux, openSUSE News

    I have installed MX Linux on several machines. December of 2018 was my first experience with it and I really enjoyed how it worked, quite literally everything about it. I was thinking a lot about WHY I like MX Linux and I think these are my top reasons:

    Simplicity of the desktop. Although my primary machine runs Plasma as my desktop of choice and it does what I want it to do, it feels snappy and is tuned to my preferences, Xfce accomplishes all of that but differently. It has the right look, it IS rather easy to customize although not quite to the same accessibly easy level and is most certainly quite snappy.

    The changes in MX 19 are not “earth shattering” and headline popping but they are all quite welcome. The High DPI support is of no benefit to me but for those with those fancy 4k monitors there is. A visual update to MX 19 that is partially related to Xfce 4.14 but is also due to general visual updates that MX has been given over time.

  • The Librem 5 smartphone. Now shipping.

    The Librem 5 smartphone -- focused on security, privacy, and user freedom -- has begun shipping! This is the very first video of the very first Librem 5 to roll off the assembly line!

  • Purism Shows Off The Librem 5 Linux Smartphone In Action

    Now that the first (beta-ish) batch of Librem 5 smartphones is shipping, Purism has published the first video showing the phone in its current state in action.

    The 30 second video simply shows the phone being unlocked and some basic interactions with their GTK/Wayland-based shell, briefling launching their web browser, opening GNOME Software, and opening their messaging/contacts program. It's a very brief video given the software stack is still a work-in-progress on performance and features. Likewise with their graphics driver supporting GL2 right now, don't expect any games or really fancy graphics running.

  • The Linux Link Tech Show Episode 827
  • Bots Building Jails | BSD Now 317

    Setting up buildbot in FreeBSD jails, Set up a mail server with OpenSMTPD, Dovecot and Rspamd, OpenBSD amateur packet radio with HamBSD, DragonFlyBSD's HAMMER2 gets fsck, return of startx for users.

  • Why Self-Host? | Self-Hosted 2

    We visit Wendell Wilson of Level1Techs and get a tour of his self-hosted setup, what he does and does not trust in the cloud, and we reminisce about the early days of computing and the internet.

    Plus we discuss craftmanship in the Linux Kernel, and adress the fundamental question of "why self-host."

Audiocasts/Shows: Linux Headlines, mintCast and FLOSS Weekly

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Interviews
  • 09/25/2019 | Linux Headlines

    A patent lawsuit takes aim at the GNOME Foundation, Cloudflare launches a VPN service that does not protect privacy, a long-standing exploit has finally been disclosed for vBulletin, and Google has announced their latest code-in challenge.

  • mintCast 318 – Melted Plastic

    This week, in our Wanderings, Leo writes about Nextcloud, Bo spreads the Linux love, Tony Hughes can’t stop Linuxing, even on holiday, Josh considers the new iPhone 11 (wait really??) after yet another broken Pixel 3 , Joe spelunks into splunk, and Tony Watts is building a server.

    Then, in our News, we cover Ubuntu’s 32-bit library support, the top 5 snaps per distro, the PineTime, and more.
    In security, we talk locks, DoH and Lastpass

  • FLOSS Weekly 548: GNOME

    GNOME is an easy and elegant way to use your computer. It's designed to put you in control and get things done.

Audiocasts/Shows

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Interviews
  • LHS Episode #303: The Weekender XXXIV

    It's time once again for The Weekender. This is our bi-weekly departure into the world of amateur radio contests, open source conventions, special events, listener challenges, hedonism and just plain fun. Thanks for listening and, if you happen to get a chance, feel free to call us or e-mail and send us some feedback. Tell us how we're doing. We'd love to hear from you.

  • 09/20/2019 | Linux Headlines

    The first Open Core Summit, an activist programmer takes aim at Chef, a French court disagrees with Valve’s licensing model, and Lennart Poettering wants to rethink the Home directory.

  • Too Good To Be True | TechSNAP 412

    It's TechSNAP story time as we head out into the field with Jim and put Sure-Fi technology to the test.

    Plus an update on Wifi 6, an enlightening Chromebook bug, and some not-quite-quantum key distribution.

Wisconsin Broadcasters Clinic Preview: Raspberry Pi

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Linux
Interviews

The Raspberry Pi is a single board SOC (system on a chip) computer that is about the size of a deck of cards. It runs a ARMCore version of Debian Linux in a standard configuration but can also run Ubuntu Linux, several other more obscure OSes, and Windows 10 IOT (If you like the Microsoft [non]security model). The basic Raspberry Pi model lists at $35 US so it is a very cost effective solution for those broadcast applications that would normally require a full blown PC to just loaf along and do one thing.

I have implemented several applications for the Raspberry Pi for our studios and transmitters for Cumulus Chicago. We will be showing, hands-on, several of these applications at the “Nuts and Bolts” session of the Wisconsin Broadcasters fall show. My first application was porting Anthony Eden’s Livewire Simple Delegation Switcher to the Pi. At that point it only ran on Windows in a windowed configuration. I needed a border-less configuration with large buttons to use as a monitor routing panel to select which audio went to overhead speakers in Sales, Promotions, and common areas. Since the code is open source, I modified it to fit my needs. Since that time, Anthony has posted Raspberry Pi configuration instructions on his GIT repository web site.

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Video/Audio: Self-Hosted, CubicleNate Noodlings, LibreOffice Conference 2019

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Interviews
  • The First One | Self-Hosted 1

    You’ve been wanting to host a Nextcloud instance (or anything else) for your family for a while now. Where on Earth do you start? We share some hard learned lessons about self-hosting, discuss the most important things to consider when building a home server, and Chris gives Alex a hard time about Arch as a Server OS.

  • CubicleNate Noodlings | Episode 02 Desktops and Window Managers, BDLL and openSUSE News

    I view KDE Plasma as the pinnacle of all things that are the Desktop and portal into your digital life. This is of course my own opinion but really, what else can do as much as Plasma, in as little resources and be as flexible as it is.

    Xfce is the GTK desktop that is, in my estimation, the benchmark to which all GTK desktops should be measured against. It is what I would call a “classic” Redmond style interface that is familiar to nearly everybody.

  • Video: Opening session of LibreOffice Conference 2019

    Here’s the opening session – there’s a quick introduction in Spanish, followed by English at 00:40...

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