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Interviews

Audiocasts: Linux Action News, OpenBSD in Stereo, GNU World Order, Coder Radio and Open Source Security Podcast

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Interviews
  • Linux Action News 83

    Plus the Kernel team’s clever Spectre slowdown fix, Emby goes proprietary, Steam Link lives on, and more.

  • OpenBSD in Stereo | BSD Now 275

    DragonflyBSD 5.4 has been released, down the Gopher hole with OpenBSD, OpenBSD in stereo with VFIO, BSD/OS the best candidate for legally tested open source Unix, OpenBGPD adds diversity to the routing server landscape, and more.

  • GNU World Order

    More listener email about ZFS. Noise music. More about workflows, and how to find the right application for your task.

  • Coder Radio 334

    Mike and Chris don’t claim to have a time machine, but they still have a major problem to solve.

  • Open Source Security Podcast: Episode 126 - The not so dire future of supply chain security

    Josh and Kurt continue the discussion from episode 125. We look at the possible future of software supply chains. It's far less dire than previously expected.

Audiocasts: Ubuntu Podcast and Destination Linux

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Interviews
  • Ubuntu Podcast from the UK LoCo: S11E39 – The Thirty-Nine Steps

    This week we’ve been flashing devices and getting a new display. We discuss Huawei developing its own mobile OS, Steam Link coming to the Raspberry Pi, Epic Games laucnhing their own digital store and we round up the community news.

    It’s Season 11 Episode 39 of the Ubuntu Podcast! Alan Pope, Mark Johnson and Martin Wimpress are connected and speaking to your brain.

  • Destination Linux EP99 - ASCII And You Shall Receive

    On this episode of Destination Linux, we discuss some distro news with VyOS & Fedora. We have great follow up regarding the kernel performance killer news we discussed last week. Some very big updates are coming from great software projects like Blender & Kodi. Later in the show, we check out some of Zeb’s favourite type of games! We also talk about the Plasma Mobile related news from Necuno Solutions. All that and much more including our Tips, Tricks and Software Spotlight picks!

Audiocasts/Shows: mintCast, The Linux Link Tech Show and FLOSS Weekly With OpenVPN

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Interviews

Talks/Audiocasts: Linux in the Ham Shack. Linux Plumbers Conference, This Week in Linux, Linux Action News

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Interviews
  • LHS Episode #261: The Weekender XX

    Welcome to Episode #261 of Linux in the Ham Shack. In this, our 20th Weekender edition, we give you information on upcoming amateur radio contests and special event stations, upcoming open-source conferences and events, personal challenges, Linux distributions to try and a whole bunch of hedonism. It's the perfect intro to your next two weekends. Thank you for listening.

  • Open source compute stack talk from Linux Plumbers Conference 2018

    I spoke at Linux Plumbers Conference 2018 in Vancouver a few weeks ago, about CUDA and the state of open source compute stacks.

  • Episode 45 | This Week in Linux

    On this episode of This Week in Linux, we follow up on the Kernel Performance issues we discussed last week. There may be a new contender in the Mobile market using Plasma Mobile. We’ll also check out some distro news from Fedora, BlackArch and Intel’s Clear Linux. A lot of exciting App News was released this week for upcoming releases to Blender, Kodi., and more. Later in the show, we’ll check out a new game from Valve and some Security News. All that and much more!

  • Linux Action News 82

    Clear Linux doubles down on the desktop, Fedora 31 is likely canceled or delayed, and why Firecracker is being called the new “Docker killer”.

Audiocasts: FLOSS Weekly, Linux Link Tech Show and Linux Journal

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Interviews

Audio: Skipping Fedora 31, "Linux Sucks" and More

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Interviews
  • Skipping Fedora 31 | LINUX Unplugged 277

    Fedora might take a year off, to focus on it self. Project Lead and Council Chair Matthew Miller joins us to explain this major proposal.

    Plus Wimpy shares his open source Drobo alternative, and our final Dropbox XFS hack.

    Special Guests: Brent Gervais, Martin Wimpress, and Matthew Miller.

  • Linux Sucks. Forever.
  • Let your geek flag fly

    Myles and Mark talk about being intentional with your life instead of letting your life happen to you.

Audiocasts/Shows: Using Calibre To Keep Your Digital Library and Linux Action News 81

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Interviews
  • Using Calibre To Keep Your Digital Library In Order with Kovid Goyal - Episode 187

    Digital books are convenient and useful ways to have easy access to large volumes of information. Unfortunately, keeping track of them all can be difficult as you gain more books from different sources. Keeping your reading device synchronized with the material that you want to read is also challenging. In this episode Kovid Goyal explains how he created the Calibre digital library manager to solve these problems for himself, how it grew to be the most popular application for organizing ebooks, and how it works under the covers. Calibre is an incredibly useful piece of software with a lot of hidden complexity and a great story behind it.

  • Linux Action News 81

    The Fuchsia bomb ticks closer, Valve’s Steam Link end of life shocks us, and Amazon’s new, rather obvious feature.

    Plus the surprise use for Red Hat Enterprise, and an update on the Linux powered Atari VCS.

Audiocasts: Linux Action News and Deconstructed Dialog

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Interviews
  • Linux Action News 80

    Mark Shuttleworth announced 10 years support of Ubuntu 18.04, but there’s a catch. Why we’re buying the new Raspberry Pi, and we have a laugh at folding Android screens.

    Plus the new Red Hat Enterprise beta has modularity, why Canonical might be ready for investors, and the bad week for cryptocurrencies.

  • Deconstructed Dialog | User Error 53

    There's something almost intangible about the way Linux presents itself and Popey tries to explain it, the balance between living for the moment and planning for the future, and doing it wrong with social media.

Interview With Mark Shuttleworth

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Interviews
Ubuntu

Mark Shuttleworth delivered an unashamed plug for Ubuntu while cheerfully throwing a little shade on the competition at the OpenStack Berlin 2018 summit last week.

If Nick Barcet of Red Hat had elicited gasps by suggesting the OpenStack Foundation (OSF) might consider releasing updates a bit more frequently, Shuttleworth sent eyebrows skywards by announcing that the latest Long Term Support (LTS) edition of Ubuntu, 18.04, would get 10 years of support.

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Akash Angle: How do you Fedora?

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Red Hat
Interviews

Akash is a fan of the GNOME 3 desktop environment. He loves most of the goodies and bells and whistles the OS can throw in for getting basic tasks done.

For practical reasons he prefers a fresh installation as a way of upgrading to the latest Fedora version. He thinks Fedora 29 is arguably the the best workstation out there. Akash says this has been backed up by reviews of various tech evangelists and open source news sites.

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More in Tux Machines

ODROID-XU4: Much Better Performance Than The Raspberry Pi Plus USB3 & Gigabit Ethernet @ $60

Hardkernel recently sent over the ODROUD-XU4 for benchmarking. This ARM SBC that just measures in at about 82 x 58 x 22 mm offers much better performance than many of the sub-$100 ARM SBCs while also featuring dual USB 3.0 ports, Gigabit Ethernet, eMMC storage, and is software compatible with the older XU3 ARM SBCs. Here's a look at the performance of the ODROID-XU4 compared to a variety of other single board computers. This ~$60+ ARM single board computer is built around a Samsung Exynos5422 SoC that features four Cortex-A15 cores at 2.0GHz and four Cortex-A7 cores at 1.3GHz while the graphics are provided by a Mali-T628. Read more

Six-port network appliance runs Linux on Atom C3558

Acrosser’s compact “AND-DNV3N2” networking appliance runs Linux on a quad-core, 2.2GHz Atom C3558 and offers a SATA-III bay, 2x mini-PCIe and USB 3.0 ports, and 6x GbE ports, two of which can be outfitted as fiber SFP ports. Acrosser, which says it is now an Intel IoT Solutions Alliance partner, announced a desktop network appliance available with 6x copper Gigabit Ethernet ports or 4x GbE and 2x fiber-optic SFP ports. Like Advantech’s 6x port FWA-1012VC appliance, the AND-DNV3N2 Micro Box Networking Appliance runs on a quad-core, 2.2GHz Atom C3558 “Denverton” server SoC. (The Advantech model also sells an 8-port variant with an octa-core C3758.) Read more

today's leftovers

  • Director v1.6.0 is available
    Icinga Director v1.6.0 has been released with Multi-Instance Support, Configuration Baskets and improved Health Checks. We’re excited to announce new features that will help you to work more efficiently.
  • Fedora Looks To Build Firefox With Clang For Better Performance & Compilation Speed
    Following the move by upstream Mozilla in switching their Linux builds of Firefox from being compiled by GCC to LLVM Clang, Fedora is planning the same transition of compilers in the name of compilation speed and resulting performance. FESCo Ticket 2020 laid out the case, "Mozilla upstream switches from gcc to clang and we're going to follow upstream here due to clang performance, maintenance costs and compilation speed. Tom Stellard (clang maintainer) has asked me to file this ticket to comply with Fedora processes."
  • Work in progress: PHP stack for EL-8
  • Sandwich-style SBC offers four 10GbE SFP+ ports
    SolidRun’s “ClearFog CX 8K” SBC is built around a “CEx7 A8040” COM Express Type 7 module that runs Linux on a quad -A72 Armada A8040. Features include 4x 10GbE SFP+ ports and mini-PCIe, M.2, and SATA expansion. In August, SolidRun updated its ClearFog line of Linux-driven router boards with a high-end ClearFog GT 8K SBC with the same 2GHz, quad-core, Cortex-A72 Marvell Armada A8040 SoC found on its MacchiatoBIN Double Shot Mini-ITX board. Now, the company has returned to the headless (no graphics) Armada A8040 with the ClearFog CX 8K. [..] It’s rare to see an Arm-based Type 7 module.
  • Watch Out: Clicking “Check for Updates” Still Installs Unstable Updates on Windows 10
    Microsoft hasn’t learned its lesson. If you click the “Check for Updates” button in the Settings app, Microsoft still considers you a “seeker” and will give you “preview” updates that haven’t gone through the normal testing process. This problem came to everyone’s attention with the release of the October 2018 Update. It was pulled for deleting people’s files, but anyone who clicked “Check for Updates” in the first few days effectively signed up as a tester and got the buggy update. The “Check for Updates” button apparently means “Please install potentially updates that haven’t gone through a normal testing process.”

OSS Leftovers

  • DAV1D v0.1 AV1 Video Decoder Released
    Out today is DAV1D as the first official (v0.1) release of this leading open-source AV1 video decoder. This release was decided since its quality is good enough for use, covers all AV1 specs and features, and is quite fast on desktop class hardware and improving for mobile SoCs.
  • PikcioChain plans for open-source MainNet in roadmap update
    France-based PikcioChain, a platform designed to handle and monetize personal data, has announced changes to its development roadmap as it looks towards the launch of its standalone MainNet and block explorer in the first quarter of 2019.
  • New Blockstream Bitcoin Block Explorer Announces The Release Of Its Open Source Code Esplora
    Blockstream has just announced a release of Esplora, its open source software. This is the software that keeps the website and network running. This new release follows on the heels of its block explorer that was released in November to the public. The company released the block explorer, and after making sure it was successful, released the code behind that block explorer. This way, developers can easily create their block explorers, build add-ons and extensions as well as contribute to Blockstream.info.
  • Will Concerns Break Open Source Containers?
    Open source containers, which isolate applications from the host system, appear to be gaining traction with IT professionals in the U.S. defense community. But for all their benefits, security remains a notable Achilles’ heel for a couple of reasons. First, containers are still fairly nascent, and many administrators are not yet completely familiar with their capabilities. It’s difficult to secure something you don’t completely understand. Second, containers are designed in a way that hampers visibility. This lack of visibility can make securing containers extremely taxing.
  • Huawei, RoboSense join group pushing open-source autonomous driving technology
    Telecommunications equipment giant Huawei Technologies, its semiconductor subsidiary HiSilicon and RoboSense, a maker of lidar sensors used in driverless cars, have become the first Chinese companies to help establish an international non-profit group that supports open-source autonomous driving projects. The three firms are among the more than 20 founding members of the Autoware Foundation, which aims to promote collaboration between corporate and academic research efforts in autonomous driving technology, according to a statement from the group on Monday. The foundation is an outgrowth of Autoware.AI, an open-source autonomous driving platform that was started by Nagoya University associate professor Shinpei Kato in 2015.
  • 40 top Linux and open source conferences in 2019
    Every year Opensource.com editors, writers, and readers attend open source-related conference and events hosted around the world. As we started planning our 2019 schedules, we rounded up a few top picks for the year. Which conferences do you plan to attend in 2019? If you don't see your conference on this list, be sure to tell us about it in the comments and add it to our community conference calendar. (And for more events to attend, check out The Enterprisers Project list of business leadership conferences worth exploring in 2019.)
  • Adding graphics to the Windows System for Linux [Ed: CBS is still employing loads of Microsoft boosters like Simon Bisson, to whom "Linux" is just something for Microsoft to swallow]/
  • Kong launches its fully managed API platform [Ed: Typical openwashing of APIs, even using the term "open source" where it clearly does not belong]g
  • How Shared, Open Data Can Help Us Better Overcome Disasters
    WHEN A MASSIVE earthquake and tsunami hit the eastern coast of Japan on March 11, 2011, the Fukushima Daiichi Nuclear Power Plant failed, leaking radioactive material into the atmosphere and water. People around the country as well as others with family and friends in Japan were, understandably, concerned about radiation levels—but there was no easy way for them to get that information. I was part of a small group of volunteers who came together to start a nonprofit organization, Safecast, to design, build, and deploy Geiger counters and a website that would eventually make more than 100 million measurements of radiation levels available to the public. We started in Japan, of course, but eventually people around the world joined the movement, creating an open global data set. The key to success was the mobile, easy to operate, high-quality but lower-cost kit that the Safecast team developed, which people could buy and build to collect data that they might then share on the Safecast website.