Language Selection

English French German Italian Portuguese Spanish

Interviews

The Big Android Dev Interview: Paul Lammertsma

Filed under
Android
Interviews

That's a really interesting question. I started in 2010, I think it was. I was actually in a molecular biology startup, and we were doing software for scientists, virologists, to basically plan experiments about cloning and genetic research and stuff like that. And a colleague of mine, he came into the office one day and he had bought an HTC Desire. He was really excited about it, and said "hey, over the weekend I made this app."

Read more

How IBM’s LinuxONE Has Evolved For the New Open Source Cloud

Filed under
Interviews
OSS

LinuxONE is IBM’s Linux Server. The LinuxONE server runs the major distributions of Linux; SUSE, Red Hat and Canonical’s Ubuntu. The server also runs open source databases like Mongo DB , PostgreSQL and MariaDB allowing for both horizontal growth and vertical scale, as demonstrated by running a 2TB Mongo database without sharding. Several of the features built into this system support the constant innovation inherent in the open source movement while maintaining the performance and reliability required by Enterprise clients; for example, Logical Partitions (LPARs) allow clients to host a development environment on the same system as production with zero risk.

Read more

The Big Android Dev Interview: Maarten Edgar

Filed under
Android
Interviews

Good question! Well, I like [that] it's open source, I like that [in mobile development in particular] you make something and it's "one there." Specifically or Android, I like that it runs on a lot of different things. I've done some commercial Google Glass development — and, you know, it has a skin, but it is Android.

I like that you can do really useful stuff [with Android], it keeps on evolving and getting more interesting, so I like that.

What I don't like is... implementations of Android that are not truly Android — Samsung had this problem where, for example, you'd ask something in the system, you'd do a system call [asking] what kind of resolution it was and it would lie to you! It would say "oh no, I'm HDPI" when really it was an MDPI thing. And that just pisses me off. Incorrect documentation. And what's difficult is all the different device sizes. That is a challenge. Not necessarily something that I hate but it is challenging.

Read more

The Big Android Dev Interview: Jolanda Verhoef

Filed under
Android
Interviews

My name is Jolanda Verhoef and I've been developing for Android for six years, focusing mainly on architecture. [At the Big Android BBQ] I gave a talk on architecture together with RxJava. So, how can RxJava help you create a nice clean architecture. I work at a company called Blendle, which is a startup in the Netherlands, and before that I worked at companies like Philips, Dutch railway stations, Enexis, stuff like that. And I built my own app for geocaching as well.

Read more

2016 LiFT Scholarship Winner Ahmed Alkabary: A Recent Graduate and Aspiring SysAdmin

Filed under
Interviews

For me, I don’t just appreciate the Linux operating system but I also feel like it has become my life. Whenever I’m on a Linux based computer I feel like I’m at home. You can say it is a passion that has taken many years of cultivating to become integrated in my life the way it is today.

In 2011 I was eager to purchase a brand new computer, but to my dismay the shop had only one computer that met my requirements. Although unbeknownst to me the computer had a specific operating system that I was unfamiliar with. The operating system was pre-installed with Linux, specifically openSuse. I was so hesitant to purchase the computer but proceeded anyway. I hoped to change the operating system once I got home, but I was unsure of what came over me to keep Linux. But to this day I feel I have yet to make a decision that would have a greater impact on my life then the day I decided to keep Linux.

Read more

Be Cautious With Containers Says FutureAdvisor’s DevOps Director

Filed under
Interviews

Docker is a fantastic technology, but it’s not one that’s well understood. If we take a look at the lessons of the past, there was more hype than understanding around cloud as well — and before that, around virtualization. I’m seeing the same patterns repeat themselves here, and in some circles this is a far from popular viewpoint.

Read more

Siddarth Sharma: How do you Fedora?

Filed under
Red Hat
Interviews

Sharma is a software engineer on the Red Hat product security team. He focuses on security of storage products such as Ceph and Gluster. He used to work as a software maintenance engineer at Red Hat, looking after the GNOME and KDE desktop packages. “I learned from the most talented people in the software security industry and still have a lot to learn,” said Sharma. He started using Linux in 2004 with Red Hat Enterprise Linux 3, but later switched to Fedora Core 2.

Read more

Linux Foundation Certified Engineer: Ronni Jensen

Filed under
Linux
Interviews

I've actually been distro-hopping for a long time, going back and forth between various Debian-derivatives, but the last couple of years I've been a fan of openSUSE. I like openSUSE's way of doing things and that I have a choice between rock-solid (Leap) and bleeding edge (Tumbleweed). Right now, though, my computers are running a mix of openSUSE Leap, CentOS 7, and RHEL 7.

Read more

Interview with Thomas Cameron – Senior Principal Cloud Evangelist at Red Hat

Filed under
Red Hat
Interviews

I’d love to show that Red Hat folks outside of the Fedora project are
committed to the greater community. I’d also love to get folks up to
speed on container security (the topic of my presentation).

Read more

Luis Motta: How Do You Fedora?

Filed under
Red Hat
Interviews

Luis Motta was born in 1963 on the same day as Mick Jagger, which may explain why he has been a rock and roll guitar player since 1982. Motta plays in three different bands. He and his friends play gigs at local bars with a preference for heavy rock. Motta says, “Louder is better!” His favorite music groups are Rush, System of a Down, and Red Fang. As a guitarist, he likes Alex Lifeson. “Today, me and a friend, Jesiel Rocha, give lectures on the use of free software for music recording,” said Luis.

Read more

Syndicate content

More in Tux Machines

Schools that #GoOpen should #GoOpenSource

School administrators know that traditional proprietary textbooks are expensive. Teachers in budget-strapped schools often face shortages of textbooks. Worse, print content is usually out-of-date as soon as the ink dries on the page. There has to be something better than students hauling bulbous backpacks loaded with dead knowledge stamped on dead trees. In the fall of 2015, the U.S. Department of Education launched the #GoOpen campaign, an initiative encouraging public schools to adopt openly-licensed digital educational materials to transform teaching and learning, and perhaps lighten both backpacks and textbook bills. The Department recently published the #GoOpen District Launch Packet, a useful step-by-step implementation guide for schools planning a transition from traditional textbooks to Open Educational Resources (OER). We should applaud the Department of Education's efforts to promote affordable, equitable, and quality educational materials for all schools. Their initiative empowers educators to curate, shape, and share educational content at a local level. No longer is the written word of proprietary publishers like Pearson the fountain of all classroom knowledge. Districts that choose to #GoOpen opt to honor teacher expertise, empower them to build communities of shared practice, and encourage collaboration with colleagues across counties and states. Given unfettered permission to revise, remix, and redistribute curriculum material, teachers are trusted to become active agents in the creation of high-quality learning materials. Read more

Red Hat and Fedora

  • Red Hat CEO Tells LinuxCon Crowd What Makes Linux Stand Out
    Five years ago, on the 20th anniversary of Linux, Red Hat CEO Jim Whitehurst delivered a keynote address at LinuxCon. Today, he returned to the LinuxCon stage here to help celebrate the 25th anniversary of Linux, bringing a message not all that different from the one he shared in 2011. The Linux world, however, is a different place in 2016, with one-time mortal foe Microsoft now embracing the open-source model. Whitehurst briefly shared the keynote stage with Wim Coekaerts, corporate vice president of enterprise open source at Microsoft, which is something that wouldn't have happened five years ago. Red Hat and Microsoft today partner at multiple levels, as the message and value of open source has continued to expand. During his keynote, Whitehurst said that it's hard to talk about the history of Red Hat without talking about the history of Linux and vice versa, as the two are very much intertwined. Back in the 1990s when Red Hat got started a few years after Linux's birth, Whitehurst said his company didn't have a great business model. At one point, Red Hat actually tried to sell shrink-wrapped boxed software at big box retailers. Around 2001, Red Hat first introduced the enterprise open-source software model that is the core of the company's business today. The basic idea is to bundle open-source software together, test and certify the software, and then provide multiple years of enterprise-grade support.
  • Option Market: Red Hat Inc Risk Hits A Deteriorated Level
  • Building Fedora Rawhide Images with Imagefactory
  • Fedora 24 Release Party in Singapore
    As you might know, Fedora released its 24th version at the end of June! Recently, the Fedorans in Singapore had a party to celebrate the release. The release party was not only to celebrate its release, but also to commemorate Fedora’s open source journey so far. We invited people from different diverse background to join us for a night of fun and open conversations (Singapore is a cosmopolitan country!)

GNOME News

  • Sysprof + Builder
    After the GNOME 3.20 cycle completed I started revamping Sysprof. More here, here, and here. The development went so smoothly that I did a 3.20 release a couple of weeks later. A primary motivation of that work was rebuilding Sysprof into a set of libraries for building new tools. In particular, I wanted to integrate Sysprof with Builder as our profiler of choice. On my flight back from GUADEC I laid the groundwork to integrate these two projects. As of Builder 3.21.90 (released yesterday) you can now profile your project quite easily. There are more corner cases we need to handle but I consider those incremental bugs now.
  • GUADEC… Its been fun.
    I’m not really much of a traveler or outgoing in any way. So when I was invited to GUADEC, I wasn’t very sure about it. It took some encouragement from my mentor and a fellow GSoC mate to convince me. And… I’m glad I went! It was one of those things that I could not have experienced from my comfy chair to which I reserve myself for the greater part of my day. In fact this trip makes me feel I might be wrong about social interactions not being time well spent for me (but then again I don’t exactly buckle down into ambitious projects, so you’re free to call me ignorant).
  • gnome-boxes: GSoC Evaluation
    This post is meant to be a final self-evaluation and self-analysis of my work for gnome-boxes during the summer. The initial project idea was about implementing/fixing a bunch of SPICE-based features/bugs to/in Boxes. The list of bugs of the SPICE component has since changed, as some new bugs have been discovered and some old ones have been closed, so I made a summary of my involvement...

Paid-for Microsoft Openwashing at LinuxCon