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Interviews

Richard Stallman: A Discussion on Freedom, Privacy & Cryptocurrencies

Filed under
GNU
Interviews

Dr. Richard Stallman is well-known for his free software movement activism. His speeches and work revolve around a term: freedom. And it is precisely that word that prompted Stallman to launch the GNU Project, founding the Free Software Foundation and releasing the GNU General Public License, among other projects, to promote the free software concept.

RMS, as Dr. Stallman is also known, has some opinions regarding the concept of cryptocurrencies that have been widely discussed within the crypto community.

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Audiocasts/Shows: Kubernetes, Open Source Security Podcast and "Reflecting On My Linux Journey"

Filed under
GNU
Linux
Interviews
  • Physics, politics and Pull Requests: the Kubernetes 1.18 release interview

    The start of the COVID-19 pandemic couldn't delay the release of Kubernetes 1.18, but unfortunately a small bug could — thankfully only by a day. This was the last cat that needed to be herded by 1.18 release lead Jorge Alarcón before the release on March 25.

    One of the best parts about co-hosting the weekly Kubernetes Podcast from Google is the conversations we have with the people who help bring Kubernetes releases together. Jorge was our guest on episode 96 back in March, and just like last week we are delighted to bring you the transcript of this interview.

    If you'd rather enjoy the "audiobook version", including another interview when 1.19 is released later this month, subscribe to the show wherever you get your podcasts.

    In the last few weeks, we've talked to long-time Kubernetes contributors and SIG leads David Oppenheimer, David Ashpole and Wojciech Tyczynski. All are worth taking the dog for a longer walk to listen to!

  • Open Source Security Podcast/Josh Bressers: Episode 208 – Passwords are pollution

    Josh and Kurt talk about some of the necessary evils of security. There are challenges we face like passwords and resource management. Sometimes the problem is old ideas, sometimes it’s we don’t have metrics. Can you measure not getting hacked?

  • Reflecting On My Linux Journey And Where It May Lead

    I ramble a bit about my Linux journey. Well, not just my Linux journey since my story begins before Linux existed. And even in the parts of the story that involve my Linux years, the story is really more about my journey with "free and open source software".

Community Member Monday: Sandra Louvero

Filed under
LibO
Interviews

Today we’re talking to Sandra Louvero, who is helping to spread the word about LibreOffice and FOSS in Congo. Also, she recently became a Member of The Document Foundation, the non-profit entity behind LibreOffice…

[...]

In Pointe-Noire I belong to a community called “Librists”. Our goal is to help people discover the world of open source software here in Congo – which very few people know about. I am responsible for training people to use the LibreOffice suite, and we have named the training “SPRINT”, which lasts 60 days per component starting from Writer, Calc, Impress etc.

The aim of this sprint is to help users learn the applications, and get their comments, to then bring back to the LibreOffice Francophone community, to which I also belong. Then we can continue to improve LibreOffice.

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Also: LibreOffice GSoC Week 8 Report

Troubleshoot Linux kernel panic with kdump crash tool

Filed under
Linux
Interviews

Kernel panic is a critical issue that manifests as a system freeze. If you're not familiar with what a kernel does, it is the core of an OS. Linux itself is a kernel, which enables developers to create numerous distributions.

A serious enough error at the kernel can cause an event known as kernel panic. This is similar to Window's blue screen of death, but instead of seeing a blue screen, you simply see a log output on a black screen.

Kernel panic can occur due to bad memory, driver crashes, malware or software bugs. To identify the cause of kernel panic, you can use the kdump service to collect crash dumps, perform a root cause analysis and troubleshoot the system.

To get started, you should have two VMs that run CentOS. This tutorial uses CentOS 8 as the Linux distribution for both the Network File System (NFS) server and client.

If you configure the client to send the crash dumps to an NFS share, you can centrally gather and analyze a crash dump without using the system that is affected by kernel panic.

Below are the IP addresses of the NFS server and client. Your addresses may differ depending on your subnet configuration, but both addresses are necessary.

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Interview – NXP Linux BSP and Timesys Vigiles Maintenance Service & Security Updates

Filed under
Development
Linux
Interviews

Answer: The kernel strategy for NXP’s i.MX family BSPs closely follows the annual cadence of kernel.org’s LTS kernel selection. As soon as kernel.org establishes the next official LTS kernel version, NXP transitions our internal development to that particular kernel. However, the migration of the kernel is only one aspect of our next major release. There may be a number of associated updates to be included, such as a new version to Yocto, updates to U-Boot, and many other package changes we integrate into the Yocto release specific to the i.MX BSP. These factors, plus our rigorous testing process create an inevitable delay between the community version of the latest LTS kernel release and NXP’s i.MX board support package (BSP) based on that same kernel.

We must also consider a number of other factors that come into play between our planned cadence of Linux LTS kernel updates. NXP may introduce new products, or there may be updates to various packages, and of course, there are issue resolutions (including LTS minor version updates) to be considered. Our engineering team must balance all these factors while maintaining consistent quality standards for the entire i.MX product family being supported by each BSP release.

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PCLinuxOS Interview and Screenshots

Filed under
PCLOS
Interviews

Why and when did you start using Linux?
2005. The security issues with Windows XP were really blowing up at the time, so when I ordered a new computer for school I made sure to do so with a second drive planning on giving 'Nix a try. I started off on Ubuntu on that machine, and when I got a laptop a couple of years later I wanted to try something different and ran through a couple distros before settling on PCLinuxOS. It's become my everyday driver, and I now use Linux most of the time on my own machines simply because I like it better. I'm currently running Debian 10 and PCLinuxOS.

What specific equipment do currently use with PCLinuxOS?
This desktop has an AMD Ryzen 7 3800X, Radeon 580X graphics, Asus X570 mobo, and 64GB of G-Skill Ripjaws RAM. I also have a Nektar Impact GX61 MIDI controller keyboard and Focusrite Scarlett 4i4 audio interface connected to this machine since it's my production rig. I also have PCLinuxOS installed on a hand-me-down laptop (Lenovo Z580) that runs only Linux.

Do you feel that your use of Linux influences the reactions you receive from your computer peers or family? If so, how?
I'm not sure how much using Linux has to do with it, but I've certainly become the tech support for my family... Outside of a few die-hards, I find that folks generally aren't too hung up on what OS you use. I use Windows, MacOS, and Linux daily and think each has its place, though I'd likely never use Windows at all on my own boxes if WINE support for games and a few audio programs was better.

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Also: [PCLinuxOS] Screenshot Showcase

Audiocasts/Shows: Ubuntu, Manjaro, Python Bytes and GNU World Order

Filed under
Development
GNU
Linux
Interviews

Interview with Albert Weand

Filed under
KDE
Interviews

A couple of years ago, I started to gain interest in GNU/Linux and even considered using it as my main OS. One of my priorities was to find a good painting application compatible with the system. I tried MyPaint and Gimp, but Krita was definitely the best option.

I really like the user interface, it’s very flexible. I like to keep things simple and just focus on the artwork. The shortcuts to navigate around the canvas are great, they feel very natural. There’s no need to change tools in order to zoom in, zoom out or move around the canvas. I also like the default brushes, they feel organic and the textures help to simulate real brushes in traditional painting.

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Interview with Clément Mona

Filed under
KDE
Interviews

I wanted to try someting different and a friend of mine showed me Krita in 2017.

I loved how intuitive Krita is, I handled the program very fast, more over my Wacom tablet worked perfectly on it, and that was not the case with oher applications at this time.

I love how fast I can paint with Krita. Also, the brush customisation is very nice and complete.

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In Free Software, the Community is the Most Important Ingredient: Jerry Bezencon of Linux Lite [Interview]

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Interviews

Jerry Bezencon, the creator of Linux Lite project, shares some interesting details about this popular lightweight Linux distribution.
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More in Tux Machines

Linux Foundation Broadens Relationship With Surveillance

  • Facebook joins The Linux Foundation as a platinum member

    Most web-based companies are built on Linux and open-source software. Two-billion member social network Facebook is no different. For years, Facebook has not only relied on open-source, it's been an active contributor to major open-source projects. These include the React JavaScript library; the Open Compute Project, which open sources data-center hardware; and Linux's cGroup2 container software. Now Facebook is joining The Linux Foundation membership at the Platinum level. [...] While Facebook has been criticized for how it deals with privacy and politics, it has impeccable open-source credentials. It was already the lead contributor of many Linux Foundation-hosted projects, such as Presto, GraphQL, Osquery, and ONNX. The company also employs many Linux kernel key developers and maintainers.

  • Amundsen Joins LF AI as New Incubation Project

    LF AI Foundation (LF AI), the organization building an ecosystem to sustain open source innovation in artificial intelligence (AI), machine learning (ML), and deep learning (DL), today is announcing Amundsen as its latest Incubation Project.

  • LF AI Accepts Amundsen as Incubation Project

    The Amundsen data discovery project has joined the LF AI as an incubation project. Amundsen is a data discovery and metadata engine aiming to improve the productivity of data analysts, data scientists and engineers by indexing data resources. “Think of it as Google search for data,” the LF AI announcement said.

Graphics: Mesa 20.2 RC2 and DXVK 1.7.1

  • mesa 20.2.0-rc2
    Hi list,
    
    Available today is mesa 20.2.0-rc2. This is the second release candidate for
    the 20.2 release. Currently our open to close ratio on blocking bugs is looking
    really good. This release is dominated by changes to radeonsi, radv, and aco,
    with a few additional changes sneaking in for freedreno, meson,  etnaviv,
    st/mesa, anv, and a few utility fixes.
    
    Dylan
    
    
  • Mesa 20.2-RC2 Released With Many Fixes For RadeonSI + RADV Drivers

    The second weekly release candidate of the forthcoming Mesa 20.2 is now available for testing. Mesa 20.2 is aiming for release around the end of August or early September depending upon how the bug situation plays out. This quarterly feature release to Mesa3D brings many new Vulkan extensions, the RADV driver using ACO by default, initial support for Navi 2 GPUs, initial support for Intel Rocket Lake and DG1, OpenGL 4.3 for LLVMpipe, and much more as outlined in last week's article.

  • DXVK 1.7.1 Released With Many Game Fixes For Direct3D Over Vulkan

    It's been nearly three months without a new DXVK release for mapping Direct3D 9/10/11 atop the Vulkan API while finally today there is a big feature release out. DXVK 1.7.1 was released a few minutes ago as the first update since May. While the version number isn't significant, this version does have many changes.

  • Direct3D to Vulkan translation layer DXVK 1.7.1 is out, lots of game fixes

    After a few months since 1.7 went out, DXVK 1.7.1 is now live to further improve Direct3D to Vulkan translation. This is the project that helps to power Proton, the compatibility layer for Steam Play. This release adds support for newer Vulkan extensions, fixes bugs and has new GPU driver requirements. On the driver side, the VK_EXT_transform_feedback extension is now required which has been supported in drivers on Linux since late 2018 / early 2019. Specifically you will need at least NVIDIA 415.22 and for AMD / Intel it looks like Mesa 19 covers both.

Devices/Embedded: Raspberry Pi and Android Devices

  • Indoor air quality HAT for Raspberry Pi boasts high-res TVOC sensor

    Avnet’s $49.95 “Renesas ZMOD4410 Indoor Air Quality HAT for Raspberry Pi” can be used to measure volatile organic compounds, humidity, and temperature, as well as estimate carbon dioxide levels. Avnet has launched a Renesas ZMOD4410 Indoor Air Quality HAT for Raspberry Pi (AES-RHSEN-ZM44-G) that joins other indoor air quality measurement add-ons for the Pi including Metriful’s $44.50 Sense module and Pimoroni’s $57 Enviro+ pHAT. The ZMOD4410 HAT lacks some of the extras of those boards, but appears to offer a higher quality total volatile organic compound (TVOC) sensor with its Renesas ZMOD4410, which offers resolution ranging from parts-per-billion to parts-per-million.

  • Tiny module and dev kit run RT Linux on STM32MP1

    Exor’s 25.4 x 25.4mm, extended temp “NanoSOM nS02” module runs real-time Linux and its XPlatform industrial IoT software on a soldered, 800MHz STM32MP157 with up to 1GB DDR3L and 32GB eMMC. An “OpenHMI nS02” dev kit with 5-inch touchscreen is optional. Italian embedded technology firm Exor Embedded has launched a NanoSOM nS02 module that runs real-time Linux on the new 800MHz version of ST’s dual-core, Cortex-A7 based STM32MP157. As with the recent, Apollo Lake based, FPGA-enabled GigaSOM GS01 module, Exor announced the product with Arrow, which will be distributing the module and an OpenHMI nS02 Development Kit (see farther below).

  • Zidoo Z10 Pro & Z9X Realtek RTD1619DR 4K Android Media Players Launched for $229 and up

    We previously wrote about some upcoming Realtek RTD1619 media players targeting the videophone and audiophile crowd, and expected them to launch very soon with models from Zidoo and Dune HD. Zidoo has now launched two models with the awaited Zidoo Z9X and a new, higher-end Zidoo Z10 Pro which can be purchased on Aliexpress for respectively $229 and $349 with free shipping.

  • Snapdragon 626 Powered Rugged Tablet Comes with NFC, RFID and Barcode Readers

    Estone Technology has launched another rugged tablet with UA-80 IP-67 waterproof rated, and MIL-STD-810G compliant rugged Android tablet powered by a Qualcomm Snapdragon 626 mobile platform driving an 8″ capacitive touchscreen display.

Python Programming

  • Announcing the new Jupyter Book

    Jupyter Book is an open source project for building beautiful, publication-quality books, websites, and documents from source material that contains computational content. With this post, we’re happy to announce that Jupyter Book has been re-written from the ground up, making it easier to install, faster to use, and able to create more complex publishing content in your books. It is now supported by the Executable Book Project, an open community that builds open source tools for interactive and executable documents in the Jupyter ecosystem and beyond.

  • Holdgraf: Announcing the new Jupyter Book

    On the Jupyter blog, Chris Holdgraf announces a rewrite of the Jupyter Book project. LWN looked at Jupyter and its interactive notebooks for Python and other languages back in 2018; Jupyter Book extends the notebook idea.

  • EuroPython 2020: Live Stream Recordings available

    We’re happy to announce the public availability of the live stream recordings from EuroPython 2020. They were already available to all conference attendees since the sprint days.

  • Learn Any Programming Language with This Learning Plan

    All it takes to master any programming language is the right learning plan. If you know anything about programming you should be aware that often you can’t tell whether what you are doing is wrong until it’s too late. That’s what makes programming a frustrating skill to master — long hours doing the wrong things. But hey, whether you want to make programming your full-time job or just a hobby, you can always make the learning curve less steep. The secret to getting it right with coding is this: have a learning plan! While the plan will not do the hard lifting for you, it will definitely provide the much-needed elbow grease to keep you grounded and focused as you learn programming.

  • Deploying Django to AWS ECS with Terraform

    In this tutorial, we'll look at how to deploy a Django app to AWS ECS with Terraform.

  • Matt Layman: Rendering Calendars - Building SaaS #68

    In this episode, I worked on rendering a calendar of important events in a school year. We built out the appropriate data structures, and I wrote some new model methods and added tests. On the last stream, I created a new model to track breaks in the school year. The app now shows the calendar for the school year, and I want to display the breaks on the calendar. Before digging too far into the code, I provided my thoughts about using Docker for development from a question that came from the chat.