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Moz/FF

GDPR and Mozilla, Rust, Firefox

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Moz/FF
  • Data privacy in Sailfish OS is enhancing even further as GDPR comes into effect
  • The General Data Protection Regulation and Firefox

    We are only a few days away from May 25th, when the European General Data Protection Regulation (GDPR) will go into full effect. Since we were founded, Mozilla has always stood for and practiced a set of data privacy principles that are at the heart of privacy laws like the GDPR. And we have applied those principles, not just to Europe, but to all our users worldwide. We feel like the rest of the world is catching up to where we have been all along.

  • Ready for GDPR: Firefox Focus Offers Additional Tracking Protection Against Advertisers

    It’s been nearly a year since we launched Firefox Focus for Android, and it has become one of the most popular privacy browsers for mobile around the world. In light of recent events, more and more consumers have growing awareness for privacy and secure products. The upcoming implementation of the General Data Protection Regulation (GDPR) in Europe later this month reflects this and, at the same time, highlights how important privacy is for all users.

  • rust for cortex-m7 baremetal
  • Tags are now available in Pontoon to help you prioritize your work

    Almost a couple of years ago I started working on a concept called string tiers. The goal was twofold: on one side help locales, especially those starting from scratch, to prioritize their work on a project as large as Firefox, with currently over 11 thousand strings. On the other hand, give project managers a better understanding of the current status of localization.

    Given the growth in complexity and update frequency of Developer Tools within Firefox (currently almost 2,600 strings), finding a solution to this problem became more urgent. For example, is a locale in bad shape because it misses thousands of strings? The answer would not automatically be ”yes”, since the missing strings might have a low priority.

    The string tiers concept assigns priority to strings based on their target – who is meant to see them – and their visibility. The idea is quite simple: a string warning the user about an error, or requiring an action from them, is more important than one targeting developers or website owners, and buried in the Error Console of the browser.

Mozilla: Framework, WebAssembly, Taskcluster

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Moz/FF
  • Mozilla uncovers ‘new conceptual framework’ for open source

    A report has been generated which claims to offers ‘a new conceptual framework’ of open source project archetypes.

    This research cover aspects of open source spanning business objectives, licensing, community standards, component coupling and project governance.

    It also contains some practical advice on how to use the framework (it actually is a working framework) and on how to set up projects.

  • Qt for WebAssembly – check out the examples!

    WebAssembly is now supported by all major web browsers as a binary format for allowing sand-boxed executable code in web pages that is nearly as fast as native machine code. Qt for WebAssembly makes it possible to run Qt applications on many web browsers without any download steps or special server requirements (other than serving the wasm file).

    To give you a closer look, we compiled some demos. For best performance, use Firefox.

  • Redeploying Taskcluster: Hosted vs. Shipped Software

    The Taskcluster team’s work on redeployability means switching from a hosted service to a shipped application.

    A hosted service is one where the authors of the software are also running the main instance of that software. Examples include Github, Facebook, and Mozillians. By contrast, a shipped application is deployed multiple times by people unrelated to the software’s authors. Examples of shipped applications include Gitlab, Joomla, and the Rust toolchain. And, of course, Firefox!

Mozilla: Rust Compiler, Firefox Updates and Docker

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Moz/FF
  • The Rust compiler is getting faster

    As changes are made to the Rust compiler, a suite of benchmarks measuring compile time is run regularly on the development version. The data is viewable at http://perf.rust-lang.org. The default view is graphical, showing data from the past month.

  • These Weeks in Firefox: Issue 38
  • Scaling Firefox Development Workflows

    One of the central themes of my time at Mozilla has been my pursuit of making it easier to contribute to and hack on Firefox.

    I vividly remember my first day at Mozilla in 2011 when I went to build Firefox for the first time. I thought the entire experience - from obtaining the source code, installing build dependencies, building, running tests, submitting patches for review, etc was quite... lacking. When I asked others if they thought this was an issue, many rightfully identified problems (like the build system being slow). But there was a significant population who seemed to be naive and/or apathetic to the breadth of the user experience shortcomings. This is totally understandable: the scope of the problem is immense and various people don't have the perspective, are blinded/biased by personal experience, and/or don't have the product design or UX experience necessary to comprehend the problem.

  • Release of python-zstandard 0.9

    Zstandard is a highly tunable and therefore flexible compression algorithm with support for modern features such as multi-threaded compression and dictionaries. Its performance is remarkable and if you use it as a drop-in replacement for zlib, bzip2, or other common algorithms, you'll frequently see more than a doubling in performance.

  • Revisiting Using Docker

    When Docker was taking off like wildfire in 2013, I was caught up in the excitement like everyone else. I remember knowing of the existence of LXC and container technologies in Linux at the time. But Docker seemed to be the first open source tool to actually make that technology usable (a terrific example of how user experience matters).

    At Mozilla, Docker was adopted all around me and by me for various utilities. Taskcluster - Mozilla's task execution framework geared for running complex CI systems - adopted Docker as a mechanism to run processes in self-contained images. Various groups in Mozilla adopted Docker for running services in production. I adopted Docker for integration testing of complex systems.

Mozilla: Thunderbird Rebuts EFF, Debugging Modern Web Applications, Firefox Performance, Rust Turning 3

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Moz/FF
  • Mozilla Thunderbird: EFail and Thunderbird, What You Need To Know

    DO NOT DISABLE ENCRYPTION. We’ve seen recommendations from some outlets to stop using encrypted Email altogether. If you are sending sensitive data via Email, Thunderbird still recommends using encryption to keep those messages safe. You should, however, check the configuration of the applications you use to view encrypted EMail. For Thunderbird, follow our guidelines below to protect yourself.

  • Debugging Modern Web Applications

    Building and debugging modern JavaScript applications in Firefox DevTools just took a quantum leap forward. In collaboration with Logan Smyth, Tech Lead for Babel, we leveled up the debugger’s source map support to let you inspect the code that you actually wrote. Combined with the ongoing initiative to offer first-class JS framework support across all our devtools, this will boost productivity for modern web app developers.

    Modern JS frameworks and build tools play a critical role today. Frameworks like React, Angular, and Ember let developers build declarative user interfaces with JSX, directives, and templates. Tools like Webpack, Babel, and PostCSS let developers use new JS and CSS features before they are supported by browser vendors. These tools help developers write simpler code, but generate more complicated code to debug.

  • Firefox Performance Update #8

    Talos is a framework that we use to measure various aspects of Firefox performance as part of our continuous integration pipeline.

    There are a number of Talos “suites”, where each suite contains some number of tests. These tests, in turn, report some set of numbers that are then stored and graphable via our graph viewer here.

    Here’s a full list of the Talos tests, including their purpose, the sorts of measurements they take, and who’s currently a good person to ask about them if you have questions.

    A lot of work has been done to reduce the amount of noise in our Talos tests, but they’re still quite sensitive and noisy. This is why it’s often necessary to do 5-10 retriggers of Talos test runs in order to do meaningful comparisons.

    Sometimes Talos detects regressions that aren’t actually real regressions1, and that can be a pain. However, for the times where real regressions are caught, Talos usually lets us know much faster than Telemetry or user reports.

    Did you know that you can get profiles from Try for Talos runs? This makes it much simpler to diagnose Talos regressions. Also, we now have Talos profiles being generated on our Nightly builds for added convenience!

  • This Week in Rust 234
  • Thoughts on retiring from a team

    The Rust Community Team has recently been having a conversation about what a team member’s “retirement” can or should look like. I used to be quite active on the team but now find myself without the time to contribute much, so I’m helping pioneer the “retirement” process. I’ve been talking with our subteam lead extensively about how to best do this, in a way that sets the right expectations and keeps the team membership experience great for everyone.

  • Rust turns three

    Three years ago today, the Rust community released Rust 1.0 to the world, with our initial vision of fearless systems programming. As per tradition, we’ll celebrate Rust’s birthday by taking stock of the people and the product, and especially of what’s happened in the last year.

    [...]

    Finally, the Rust community continues to work on inclusivity, through outreach programs like Rust Reach and RustBridge, as well as structured mentoring and investments in documentation to ease contribution. For 2018, a major goal is to connect and empower Rust’s global community, which we’re doing both through conference launches in multiple new continents, as well as work toward internationalization throughout the project.

Mozilla: Surveys, WebRender, Firefox 61, Response to EFail/EFFail

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  • What’s Your Open Source Strategy? Here Are 10 Answers…

    Mozilla is a radically open and participatory project. As part of the research we compiled into turning openness into a consistent competitive advantage, we identified that the application of open practices should always be paired with well-researched strategic intent. Without clarity of purpose, organizations will not (and nor should they) maintain long-term commitment to working with community. Indeed, we were not the first to observe this.

  • curl user survey 2018

    The curl user survey 2018 is up. If you ever use curl or libcurl, please donate some of your precious time and provide your answers!

    The curl user survey is an annual tradition since 2014 and it is one of our primary ways to get direct feedback from a larger audience about what's good, what's bad and what to focus on next in the curl project. Your input really helps us!

  • WebRender newsletter #19

    I skipped a newsletter again (I’m trying to put publish one every two weeks or so), sorry! As usual a lot of fixes and a few performance improvement, and sometimes both the same time. For example the changes around image and gradient repetition were primarily motivated by bugs we were encountering when dealing with repeated backgrounds containing very large amounts of repetitions, and we decided to solve these issues by moving all images to the “brush” infrastructure (bringing better batching, faster fragment shader and the ability to move more pixels out of the alpha pass), and optimize the common cases by letting the CPU generate a single primitive that is repeated in the shader. I don’t always properly highlight fixes that benefit performance but they are here.

  • GSConnect, Mozilla Firefox 61, Scientific Linux 7.5, GNOME and Nautilus

    The Mozilla team has been hard at work to address all of the known problems plaguing their bookmark sync functionality. A new engine has been developed to address these issues which landed in the latest Nightly build.

  • Cameron Kaiser: Secure mail on Power Macs is not a good idea

Mozilla and Firefox News

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Moz/FF
  • Linux sandboxing improvements in Firefox 60

    Continuing our past work, Firefox 60 brings further important improvements to security sandboxing on Linux, making it harder for attackers that find security bugs in the browser to escalate those into attacks against the rest of the system.

    The most important change is that content processes — which render Web pages and execute JavaScript — are no longer allowed to directly connect to the Internet, or connect to most local services accessed with Unix-domain sockets (for example, PulseAudio).

    This means that content processes have to follow any network access restrictions Firefox imposes — for example, if the browser has been set up to use a proxy server, connecting directly to the internet is no longer possible. But more important are the restrictions on connections to local services: they often assume that anything connecting to them has the full authority of the user running it, and either allow it to ask for arbitrary code to run, or aren't careful about preventing that. Normally that's not a security problem because the client could just run that code itself, but if it's a sandboxed Firefox process, that could have meant a sandbox escape.

    In case you encounter problems that turn out to be associated with this feature, the `security.sandbox.content.level` setting described previously can be used for troubleshooting; the network/socket isolation is controlled by level 4. Obviously we'd love to hear from you on Bugzilla too.

  • Switching to JSON for update manifests

    We plan on switching completely to JSON update manifests on Firefox and AMO. If you self-distribute your add-on please read ahead for details.

    AMO handles automatic updates for all add-ons listed on the site. For self-hosted add-ons, developers need to set an update URL and manage the update manifest file it returns. Today, AMO returns an RDF file, a common legacy add-on feature. A JSON equivalent of this file is now supported in Firefox. JSON files are smaller and easier to read. This also brings us closer to removing complex RDF parsing from Firefox code.

    Firefox 62, set to release September 5, 2018, will stop supporting the RDF variant of the update manifest. Firefox ESR users can continue using RDF manifests until the release of Firefox 68 in 2019. Nevertheless, all developers relying on RDF for their updates should read the documentation and switch soon. Firefox 45 introduced this feature, so all current versions of Firefox support it.

  • Visualizing Your Smart Home Data with the Web of Things

    Today we’re mashing up two very different applications to make a cool personal dashboard for investigating all our internet-connected things, and their behavior over time. We can use one of the Web Thing API’s superpowers: its flexibility. Like Elastigirl or Mr. Fantastic, it can bend and stretch to fit into any situation.

  • Tor Browser 7.5.4 is released

    Tor Browser 7.5.4 is now available from the Tor Browser Project page and also from our distribution directory.

    This release features important security updates to Firefox.

  • Announcing Rust 1.26

    The Rust team is happy to announce a new version of Rust, 1.26.0. Rust is a systems programming language focused on safety, speed, and concurrency.

Looking Ahead at Firefox 61 (Beta)

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Moz/FF
  • Firefox 61 Enters Development with Faster Tab Switching on Linux and Windows

    Now that Mozilla released the final Firefox 60 "Quantum" web browser, it's time for them to concentrate on the next release, Firefox 61, which enters beta testing today with a bunch of much-needed enhancements.

    While Firefox 60 marked the Quantum series as ready for enterprise deployments, Firefox 61 will focus on performance enhancements and improvements of all sorts. For starters, Firefox 61 promises to enable faster tab switching on both GNU/Linux and Microsoft Windows platforms and makes WebExtensions run in their own process on Apple's macOS.

    Talking about WebExtensions, Firefox 61 will improve the way they manage and hide tabs. Mac users are also getting a new feature in the Page Actions menu that allows them to share the current URL with the sharing providers from macOS, and it looks like the dark theme will receive various improvements for a more consistent experience across Firefox's user interface.

  • Firefox 61 Beta Brings Quantum CSS Improvements, Faster Tab Switching

    Rounding out today's Firefox 60 release comes with promoting Firefox 61 to beta.

    Firefox 61.0 is now available in beta form and it excites us a lot for a sizable amount of performance work that's been ongoing. Among the work to find with the Firefox 61 Beta are Quantum CSS improvements for faster page rendering times, improved page rendering speed thanks to retained display lists, and faster switching between tabs on Linux/Windows.

  • Firefox 60 for Android Brings Faster Page Rendering, New View Page Source Option

    Mozilla released today the Firefox 60 "Quantum" web browser for supported desktop platforms, including GNU/Linux, macOS, and Microsoft Windows, as well as for Google's Android mobile operating system.

    Mozilla Firefox 60 "Quantum" is the next ESR (Extended Support Release) version of the open-source and cross-platform web browser, introducing USB token based authentication support, enhancements to New Tab and Firefox Home pages, revamped Cookies and Site Storage section, enhanced camera privacy indicators, better WebRTC audio performance and playback on Linux, and a new a policy engine to make enterprise deployments a breeze for IT professionals.

Mozilla: Firefox 60, Things Gateway, Activity Stream and More

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  • Open for business: Firefox Quantum is ready for IT

    The new, super fast Firefox supports Windows Group Policy, so enterprise IT pros can easily configure the browser for organizational use.

    In the fall of 2017, Mozilla introduced Firefox Quantum — the blazing fast, completely reinvented Firefox. The new Firefox quickly won critical acclaim, with Wired writing that “Firefox Quantum is the browser built for 2017”.

  • Firefox 60 Is Here, And It (Finally) Includes Linux CSD Support

    Firefox 60 is now available to download and among the changes it sports is support for CSD on Linux.

    The latest stable release of Mozilla’s hugely influentially open-source web browser also brings a number of other tweaks, including a somewhat controversial change to the new tab page…

  • Firefox 60 released
  • An Enterprising Future

    So, to say that I’m happy about this particular release would be an understatement. I’m absolutely ecstatic that Mozilla decided that adding support for enterprise features was important.

    But I have to admit something; over the years in my zeal to get enterprise support into Firefox, I’ve encouraged just about every method possible to get customizations into Firefox. As a result, I know there are many installations of Firefox that use methods that are definitely not recommended anymore, especially now that we have real policy support.

  • Things Gateway - Monitoring Solar Panels
  • L10N Report: May Edition

    Activity Stream has become an integral part of Firefox, officially replacing the existing New Tab and soon integrating code for displaying snippets and onboarding content. For this reason, we’re working on moving translations to mozilla-central.

    Currently, Activity Stream is managed as a stand-alone project in Pontoon, and store its translations in a GitHub repository. Once this meta bug is fixed, Activity Stream’s strings will be exposed as part of the Firefox project.

    While this makes the relation between Activity Stream and Firefox more obvious for localizers, it will also allow to make some improvements in the future, like reducing the lag between translations landing in repositories and actually being available for testing in Firefox.

Firefox 60 Released and More Mozilla News

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Moz/FF
  • Firefox 60 Released With New Enterprise Features, Web Authentication / Yubikey Support

    Firefox 60.0 is out this morning and it's quite a big update while also being Mozilla's newest ESR release for extended support.

    Among the many changes to find with Firefox 60 is the new Policy Engine and Group Policy support for better integrating Firefox within enterprise deployments. The new policy engine supports the Windows Group Policy as well as a cross-platform JSON file for defining the policy. Firefox 60.0 also features the new Web Authentication API with support for devices like the Yubikey for dealing with passwords/authentication.

  • Firefox 60 – Modules and More

    Firefox 60 is here, and the Quantum lineage continues apace. The parallel processing prowess of Quantum CSS is now available on Firefox for Android, and work continues on WebRender, which modernizes the whole idea of what it means to draw a web page. But we’re not just spreading the love on internals. Firefox 60 boasts a number of web platform and developer-facing improvements as well.

  • Firefox Quantum: Fast for Business, Better for IT

    Browsers are key to how everyone in your company works, but how often do you think about them? A memory-hungry browser can slow your systems to a crawl, killing productivity across your org. Replacing it with a fast, lightweight browser is an easy win for IT.

    Last fall, Mozilla launched Firefox Quantum, an all-new browser based on an advanced rendering engine that bests every other browser and uses less memory. Independent tests proved its blazing-fast performance and miserly memory usage, and Wired wrote that “Firefox Quantum is the browser built for 2017”.

  • Firefox gets down to Business, and it’s Personal

    Right now everybody’s talking about the right way to make the products that we love meet our individual needs AND respect our privacy.

    At Mozilla, striking this balance has been our bread and butter for more than two decades. With today’s release of Firefox, we’re bringing you more features and tools that allow you to personalize your browser without sacrificing your privacy.

  • Mozilla Fights for Net Neutrality this May (and Always)

    Mozilla is continuing to fight for net neutrality — in the courts, alongside Americans, and, today, by joining the Red Alert protest.

    The Red Alert protest raises awareness about net neutrality’s importance, and the means for keeping it intact: In mid-May, the Senate will vote on a Congressional Review Act (CRA) resolution to overturn the FCC’s net neutrality repeal. We’re partnering with organizations like Consumer Reports, the Electronic Frontier Foundation, and Reddit to encourage Americans to call Congress in support of net neutrality.

  • This Week in Rust 233

Mozilla: Privacy, Firefox Quantum Extensions, and Rep of the Month

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  • We Asked People How They Feel About Facebook. Here’s What They Said.

    Facebook has been in the news a lot lately. It started with the announcement that over 87 million Facebook users had their personal information shared with the private firm Cambridge Analytica without their knowledge. Since then, Facebook CEO Mark Zuckerberg has testified twice in front of the US Congress and people all around the world have been talking about Facebook’s data practices. We took this opportunity to survey people on how they felt about Facebook these days. 47,000 people responded to our survey. The data is interesting and open for your exploration.

    The top takeaways? Most people (76%) say they are very concerned about the safety of their personal information online. Yet few people (24%) reported making changes to their Facebook accounts following the recent news of privacy concerns around Facebook. The majority of people who responded to our survey (65%) see themselves — rather than companies or the government — as being most responsible for protecting their personal information online. And very few people (only 12%) said they would consider paying for Facebook, even a version of Facebook that doesn’t make money by collecting and selling personal data.

  • Firefox Quantum Extensions Challenge Winners Announced!

    We know many Firefox users love web extensions, and we do, too. Today we’re announcing the winners of our Firefox Quantum Extensions Challenge.

  • Firefox Quantum Extensions Challenge Winners

    The results are in for the Firefox Quantum Extensions Challenge! We were thrilled to see so many creative, helpful, and delightful submission entries.

  • Rep of the Month – April 2018

    David is a Mozillian living the UK and active in a lot of different Mozilla projects. In his day job he is building an Open Source Fitness platform. You might have seen him at the past few MozFests in London. Last year he did a great job wrangling the Privacy&Security space.

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