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Moz/FF

Mozilla Firefox 44.0 Has Just Landed in All Supported Ubuntu Linux OSes

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Moz/FF
Ubuntu

If you're reading the news lately, you would know by now that Mozilla has pushed the Firefox 44.0 web browser to the stable channel for all supported operating systems, including Linux, Mac and Windows.

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Mozilla Now Has Push Notifications for Websites That Are Not Loaded Yet

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Moz/FF

Mozilla is trying to inform users on their new "Push Notification" feature that makes it easier for websites to send notifications even when the tab is not loaded.

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Firefox 44.0 Primed For Release

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Moz/FF

Firefox 44 continues allowing unsigned extensions thanks to a last minute change by Mozilla. Firefox 44 also has an option that can be enabled for moving WebGL off the main thread. Firefox 44 additionally presents Brotli compression algorithm support, support for VP9/WebM video support for systems lacking MP4/H.264, WebRTC improvements, Firefox For Android updates, H.264 system decoder support, the new Service Workers API, a WebSocket Debugging API, and other developer enhancements.

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Also: Mozilla Firefox 44.0 Is Now Available for Download for Linux, Mac and Windows

Rust 1.6

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Moz/FF
  • Announcing Rust 1.6

    Hello 2016! We’re happy to announce the first Rust release of the year, 1.6. Rust is a systems programming language focused on safety, speed, and concurrency.

    As always, you can install Rust 1.6 from the appropriate page on our website, and check out the detailed release notes for 1.6 on GitHub. About 1100 patches were landed in this release.

  • Rust Lang 1.6 Stabilizes Libraries

    The Mozilla-backed crew working on the Rust programming language announced the release today of Rust v1.6 as their first new version of 2016.

Firefox OS

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Moz/FF

Firefox OS has demonstrated that it's a very flexible platform. It has the potential to run on a wide range of devices, such as TVs and IoT gadgets. As long as Mozilla can find some persuasive use cases for manufacturers, it has a good chance of making an impact in these emerging fields.

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Mozilla Still Maintains Thunderbird but Discontinues Persona

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Moz/FF

Shutting down persona.org in November 2016

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Moz/FF

Hi Everyone,

When the Mozilla Identity team transitioned Persona to community
ownership, we committed resources to operational and security support
throughout 2014 [1], and renewed that commitment for 2015 [2]. Due to
low, declining usage, we are reallocating the project’s dedicated,
ongoing resources and will shut down the persona.org services that we run.

Persona.org and related domains will be taken offline on November 30th,
2016.

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Latest Firefox 43.0.4 Now Available for All Ubuntu OSes

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Moz/FF
Ubuntu

Canonical has announced that the latest Firefox 43.0.4 version has been made available in the repositories for the users of Ubuntu 15.10, Ubuntu 15.04, Ubuntu 14.04 LTS, and Ubuntu 12.04 LTS.

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More in Tux Machines

EXT4, Btrfs, XFS & NILFS2 HDD File-System Tests On Linux 4.8 (and More Linux Kernel News)

Up until running the tests for today's article, I can't remember the last time I touched a hard drive... It's been many months ago at least. Nearly all of our tests at Phoronix are from solid state storage, but I decided to pick up a new HDD for running some Linux file-system tests on a conventional hard drive for those not having an SSD. Via NewEgg.com I saw a good deal on a refurbished Hitachi Ultrastar HUA72302 "Enterprise" Hard Drive with 2TB of storage, 7200 RPM, 64MB cache, Serial ATA 3.0, and backed by HGST with a five-year warranty. For just over $30 USD it was a deal and decided to order it for running some modern Linux HDD file-system tests for curiosity sake. Read more Also: What's Been Going On With CPUFreq & The Scheduler Polychromatic Provides A Nice UI To Razer Keyboards/Mice On Linux

Red Hat Financial News

FOSS content management systems (CMS)

  • How to Resolve Your Open Content Management Quandary
    After years of development and competition, open source content management systems (CMS) have proliferated and are very powerful tools for building, deploying and managing web sites, blogs and more. You're probably familiar with some of the big names in this arena, including Drupal (which Ostatic is based on) and Joomla. As we noted in this post, selecting a CMS to build around can be a complicated process, since the publishing tools provided are hardly the only issue. The good news is that free, sophisticated guides for evaluating CMS systems have flourished. There are even good options for trying open CMS systems online before you choose one. Here, in this newly updated post, you'll find some very good resources. he first thing to pursue as you evaluate CMS systems to deploy, including the many free, good platforms, is an overview of what is available. CMSMatrix.org is a great site for plotting out side-by-side comparisons of what CMS systems have to offer. In fact, it lets you compare the features in over 1200 content management system products. Definitely take a look. This site also has a good overview of the options.
  • Postleaf is an open-source blogging platform for the design-conscious
    Content management systems are boring until you have to use one. You can install a little Drupal or WordPress, pick up some Squarespace, or just dump to Medium, the graveyard for posts about protein shakes and VC funding. But what if you could roll your own CMS? And what if you made it really cool? That’s what Cory LaViska did. LaViska is the founder of SurrealCMS and has been making it easy to edit stuff on the web for nine years. Rather than build and sell an acceptable CMS, however, he took all of his best ideas and made a far better CMS. And he made it open source and called it Postleaf.

Linux Devices

  • The Raspberry Pi and Docker Have a Bright Future Together
    As we've noted here before, when it comes to top open source stories of the past couple of years, it's clear that one of the biggest is the proliferation of tiny, inexpensive Linux-based computers at some of the smallest form factors ever seen. The diminutive, credit card-sized Raspberry Pi, which has been priced at only $25 and $35, has grabbed most of the headlines in this space, and came out this year in a new version with a more powerful 64-bit CPU, and, for the first time, built-in wireless functionality. Now, the Pi is taking on Docker smarts. If you want to work with Docker on your Raspberry Pi, all you need is Hypriot OS, a new Debian derivative designed to run Docker on the Pi.
  • Raspberry Pi VC4 Gallium3D Makes More Progress With NIR, Camera DMA-BUF
    Broadcom's Eric Anholt has written another weekly blog post covering improvements he made over the past week to the VC4 open-source graphics driver that's known as being the driver for Raspberry Pi devices.
  • Wireless-crazed IoT gateway runs on ARM or x86 Qseven COMs
    Congatec unveiled a modular, Linux-ready IoT gateway built around its Qseven COMs, providing connectivity links including 2x GBE, 6x USB, and 3x mini-PCIe.