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Moz/FF

Mozilla is Evolving the Firefox Brand (New Logo/s)

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Moz/FF
  • Evolving the Firefox Brand

    Say “Firefox” and most people think of a web browser on their laptop or phone, period. TL;DR, there’s more to the story now, and our branding needs to evolve.

    With the rapid evolution of the internet, people need new tools to make the most of it. So Firefox is creating new types of browsers and a range of new apps and services with the internet as the platform. From easy screen-shotting and file sharing to innovative ways to access the internet using voice and virtual reality, these tools will help people be more efficient, safer, and in control of their time online. Firefox is where purpose meets performance.

  • Jim Hall: What an icon says about you

    Once upon a time, the Netscape "N" was instantly recognizable as the web browser's brand icon. Later, the organization spun off into Mozilla, represented by a less memorable big red dragon head. Finally, we have Firefox, represented by a stylized fox wrapped around a small globe. The fox icon has represented the Firefox brand for years, although now the Firefox organization wants to change the brand icon.

    From an article in Venture Beat: "For most people, Firefox refers to a browser, but the company wants the brand to encompass all the various apps and services that the Firefox family of internet products cover," and "The fox with a flaming tail 'doesn't offer enough design tools to represent this entire product family'." The Firefox name will remain, but the branding will change.

  • Mozilla Is Changing Firefox Logo After Years, Wants Your Feedback

    When we think of the Firefox browser, the image of the red panda logo immediately comes to our mind. Mozilla is about to change that, and a redesigned logo will represent the versatility of products the company has started making.

    As per its blog post, Mozilla is going through possible design considerations and has invited users to post their comments. It wants to know whether the new design system still feels like Firefox, reinforces Firefox’s speed, reliability, wit and at the same time represents Mozilla’s position as a people over profit company.

Mozilla: Screenshots, WeTransfer Extension for Firefox, and WebRender

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Moz/FF
  • New Features in Screenshots

    As part of our Screenshots release on July 26, 2018, we thought we’d update you on a few new features that we think you’ll find especially useful.

    We shipped a simple image editor a few months ago to enable users to annotate and crop their shots. Now we are expanding the editor with three more features: undo, redo, and text.

  • Free your mind and move your biggest files with the WeTransfer extension for Firefox

    When you’re in the zone, be it creative or analytical, anything you can do to stay there is an asset. It’s part of why we build and design Firefox to be powerful, efficient and easy to use. It’s also why extensions can be a magic powerup for keeping you in flow online. They help you get more done in the browser, saving your brain from taxing context switching.

  • Mozilla GFX: WebRender newsletter #21

    Hi there, WebRender’s newsletter is here, delayed again by some vacation time sprinkled with a fair amount of the traditional “I’m busy” excuse. It’s been a while so there is a lot below (without counting the items I probably missed in the overwhelming amount of stuff that went into WebRender and Gecko since the last newsletter.

    One of the highlights this time is something I have been focusing on for a while, building on the async scene building infrastructure to move blob image rasterization off of the render backend thread. Instead of lazily rasterizing blob images in the critical path we now eager rasterize a subset of the blobs asynchronously during scene building. This makes sure expensive blob rasterization never prevent us from producing 60 frames per second during scrolling.
    The other highlight is that we started gathering telemetry numbers on the nightly population that opted into WebRender, and these numbers are very positive, even in areas that we haven’t spent any time optimizing yet.

RIP, Gerv Markham

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Moz/FF
Obits

  • Remembering Gerv Markham

    Gerv Markham, a friend and mentor to many in the Mozilla community, passed away last night surrounded by his family.

    Gerv worked at Mozilla for many years working in a variety of capacities including being a lead developer of Bugzilla and most recently working on special projects under the Mozilla Chairwoman.

    I had the pleasure of working with Gerv in the Thunderbird community and most recently on the MOSS Grants Committee as one of the inaugural members. Between these two areas, I often sought Gerv’s mentoring and advice, as he always had wisdom to share.

  • Daniel Glazman: Gerv, oh Gerv Sad

Mozilla: Firefox Popularity, Mercurial, Things Gateway, Rust 2018, India and Collections/User Profiles

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Moz/FF
  • State of Mozilla Support: 2018 Mid-year Update – Part 3

    We are continuing our series of mid-year posts regarding the state and future of Mozilla Support. If you missed the previous posts, part one and part two are still online. This time we are going to talk a bit more about (Support) Localization and the plans for the second half of the year.

    Over the years, localizer activity on the Support site went up and down, influenced by Firefox popularity, new released on different platforms, and general localization needs across Mozilla. Peaking at over 200 people around three years ago, it is now oscillating at 40-50% of that number.

  • Benefits of Clone Offload on Version Control Hosting

    Back in 2015, I implemented a feature in Mercurial 3.6 that allows servers to advertise URLs of pre-generated bundle files. When a compatible client performs a hg clone against a repository leveraging this feature, it downloads and applies the bundle from a URL then goes back to the server and performs the equivalent of an hg pull to obtain the changes to the repository made after the bundle was generated.

    [...]

    Anyway, I thought I'd provide an update on just how valuable the clone bundles feature is to Mozilla. In doing so, I hope maintainers of other version control tools see the obvious benefits and consider adopting the feature sooner.

    In a typical week, hg.mozilla.org is currently serving ~135 TB of data. The overwhelming majority of this data is related to the Mercurial wire protocol (i.e. not HTML / JSON served from the web interface). Of that ~135 TB, ~5 TB is served from the CDN, ~126 TB is served from S3, and ~4 TB is served from the Mercurial servers themselves. In other words, we're offloading ~97% of bytes served from the Mercurial servers to S3 and the CDN.

  • François Marier: Recovering from a botched hg histedit on a mercurial bookmark
  • K Lars Lohn: Things Gateway - Bonding Philips HUE Lights Together
  • What is Rust 2018?

    Now that some time has passed, we wanted to share more about what this actually means for Rust and Rust developers.

  • Indian telecom regulator recommends data protection norms for the internet

    The Telecom Regulatory Authority of India launched a new salvo this past week into the ongoing debate on the shape of the country’s first data protection law, with the release of their recommendations on data privacy in the telecom sector. While TRAI makes many recommendations that strengthen user rights, they also propose to extend the telecom regulatory framework to “all entities in the digital ecosystem”, a change that would result in significant harm for users and the internet ecosystem. TRAI argues that until India has a comprehensive data protection law, the licence conditions that apply to telecom companies must apply to “telecom service providers, devices, operating systems, browsers, applications etc”. We respectfully disagree with TRAIs claim that this framework is “fairly robust” in protecting user privacy. The license terms are not only an awkward fit in the context of non-telecom companies, but several conditions, like those relating to data localization, encryption, and law enforcement access, are themselves in need of urgent reform.

  • Mozilla weighs in on India’s draft data protection bill

    Yesterday, on July 27th, 2018, the Justice Srikrishna Committee of Experts, set up by the Government of India, made public its final report and the draft of India’s first comprehensive data protection law. We have long argued that the enactment of a baseline data protection law should be a national policy priority for India, and we’re pleased to see India take an important step forward towards enacting real privacy protections.

  • Mozilla Addons Blog: Collections and User Profiles have a new look

    As part of the larger redesign of addons.mozilla.org (AMO), the user profile and collections pages just got an overhaul. They now match the new style of the rest of the site, but there are also some functional changes you might be interested in.

Mozilla: Firefox Muting, Immersive Technology Conference at Houston, Latest in Rust

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Moz/FF
  • Firefox Brings Option To Mute Autoplaying Audio And Video On Websites

    We all have come across obnoxious video or audio that starts auto-playing on full volume out of nowhere. No thanks to top web browsers, who were so late in launching a fix for the most annoying feature of using the Internet.

  • Immersive Technology Conference at Houston

    At the end of last year, I was invited to speak at the Immersive Technology Conference, which took place at the University Of Houston. It was a two-day event with my talk being the first one. That always is something I simultaneously hate and still crave for. Because even if it's stressful, that is the only timeslot which allows me to actually listen to and enjoy other talks after me. Otherwise, I keep fretting over my own and can't concentrate on anything else.

    [...]

    This also was the first conference as a Mozilla TechSpeaker where I started trying to show live demos of WebXR applications running from my mobile. As you will see the experience isn't really flawless and often crashes. But it worked, I am still working out to iron out the kinks. But now the process goes much smoother as I experienced at OSCON.

  • This Week in Rust 244

    This Week in Rust is openly developed on GitHub. If you find any errors in this week's issue, please submit a PR.

Mozilla: Firefox 63, Firefox 62 Beta and More

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Moz/FF
  • Firefox 63 will cut subtrees marked with aria-hidden

    The aria-hidden attribute can be set on an element to mark it and all of its descendants as hidden from accessibility, and therefore any assistive technology, while at the same time retaining visible status on the screen itself. In this form, it is different from CSS properties such as display:none; and visibility:hidden;, which truly hide content from both the seeing eye as well as the accessibility programming interfaces.

    As noted in the ARIA 1.1 specification, extreme caution should be used when using this attribute. It may hide content from users of assistive technologies such as speech recognition, switch control, or magnifier users that they actually need to access. For more information on the different way of hiding things, I recommend this read by the Paciello Group.

  • Firefox Performance Update #10

    Hey folks – another Performance Update coming at you! It’s been a few weeks since I posted one of these, mostly due to travel, holidays and the Mozilla SF All-Hands. However, we certainly haven’t been idle during that time. Much work has been done Performance-wise, and there’s a lot to tell. So strap in! But first…

  • Firefox 62 Beta 14 Testday, August 3rd

    We are happy to let you know that Friday, August 3rd, we are organizing Firefox 62 Beta 14 Testday. We’ll be focusing our testing on Pocket, Customization and Bookmarks features. We will also have fixed bugs verification and unconfirmed bugs triage ongoing.

  • Firefox is the latest browser to block autoplaying web audio

Mozilla: Servo and Toggle Switches

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Moz/FF
  • Mozilla's Servo Has Been Picking Up A Number Of WebGL Improvements

    After being on hiatus since the end of April, Mozilla's Servo Blog has finally put out a status update concerning their web engine improvements made over the past three months.

    What really stands out in their additions to Servo over the past three months include many WebGL additions. Servo now has a number of WebGL API corrections, support for more getParameter values, several more WebGL extensions are now supported, instanced drawing calls support, better support for the uniform API calls, and other improvements. EXT_blend_minmax and EXT_texture_filter_anisotropic are among the extensions newly added to Servo.

  • The Servo Blog: These Months In Servo 112

    Our roadmap is available online, including the overall plans for 2018. It has been updated to account for Servo’s new role in Mozilla’s mixed reality team.

  • On Designing and Building Toggle Switches

    Yesterday I was working on creating the slides and accompanying demos for my upcoming Web Directions Code talk next week. One of the demos I’m creating is a basic proof of concept for a simple switch that is used to switch the theme of a UI from light to dark and vice versa. I liked, and was inspired, by the theme switch in the Medium app, shown below.

Mozilla: Privacy Suggestion, Rust Release, Addons, All Hands and VR

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Moz/FF
  • Browser privacy improvements and anti-fraud

    The good news is that interesting competition among web browsers is back, not just because of ongoing performance improvements in Firefox, but also because of Apple Safari's good work on protecting users from some kinds of cross-site tracking by default. Now the challenge for other browsers is to learn from the Safari work and build on it, to even more accurately implement the user's preferences on sharing their personal information. According to research by Tini Sevak at YouGov, 36% of users are "more likely to engage with adverts that are tailored to them", while 55% are "creeped out" by personalized ads. The browser has to get its data sharing settings right for the individual user, while minimizing the manual settings and decision fatigue that the user has to go through.

  • Announcing Rust 1.27.2

    The Rust team is happy to announce a new version of Rust, 1.27.2. Rust is a systems programming language focused on safety, speed, and concurrency.

  • [Mozilla Addons Blog:] Thank you, contributors!

    As a large, complex, and heavily visited site, it can be challenge for our small team to make sure that extension users and developers have a good experience on addons.mozilla.org (AMO). Fortunately, we are not alone. Thanks to volunteer contributors who share their time, energy, and talent, we’re able to extend our ability to extend the web by fixing reported bugs, implementing routine updates, landing new features, and moderating content listed on AMO.

  • Reps Council at SF All Hands 2018

    The All Hands is a special time of the year where Mozilla employees along with core volunteers gather for a week of many meetings and brainstorming. The All Hands Wiki page has more information about the general setting. During the All Hands, the Reps Council participated in the Open Innovation meetings as well as had meetings about improve 2018 planning.

  • This Week in Mixed Reality: Issue 13

    This week we focused on fixing bugs and delivering a seamless experience across our three areas: browsers, social, and the content ecosystem.

Mozilla: ASan Nightly Project, National Science Foundation (NSF), “Arch” at JSConf EU in Berlin

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Moz/FF
  • Introducing the ASan Nightly Project

    Every day, countless Mozillians spend numerous hours testing Firefox to ensure that Firefox users get a stable and secure product. However, no product is bug free and, despite all of our testing efforts, browsers still crash sometimes. When we investigate our crash reports, some of them even look like lingering security issues (e.g. use-after-free or other memory corruptions) but the data we have in these reports is often not sufficient for them to be actionable on their own (i.e. they do not provide enough information for a developer to be able to find and fix the problem). This is particularly true for use-after-free problems and some other types of memory corruptions where the actual crash happens a lot later than the memory violation itself.

    In our automated integration and fuzz testing, we have been using AddressSanitizer (ASan), a compile-time instrumentation, very successfully for over 5 years. The information it provides about use-after-free is much more actionable than a simple crash stack: It not only tells you immediately when the violation happens, but also includes the location where the memory was free’d previously.

  • A Science Fair with $1.6 Million in Prizes

    Across the U.S., community technologists are using creative ideas — like solar-powered Wi-Fi and mesh networks — to connect the unconnected. This August, Mozilla is gathering those projects under one roof for a science fair — and awarding $1.6 million in prizes to the most promising ideas.

    The event is the final leg of the Wireless Innovation for a Networked Society (WINS) Challenges, a $2 million competition run by the National Science Foundation (NSF) and Mozilla. Launched in 2017, the initiative awards prizes to the people and projects who are connecting unconnected Americans with scalable, secure, and resilient solutions.

  • The Arch: Using Rust & WebAssembly to animate 30k colored LED lights

    In June, Mozilla collaborated with an artist named Ian Brill to create an installation called the “Arch” at JSConf EU in Berlin. This interactive environment allowed people to experience the intersection of art and technology in a physical, pulsating, immersive way.

    Visitors could view the larger-than-life Arch and experience an ever-changing light show of 30,000 colored LEDs. To support the exhibit, Mozilla engineers built a platform that enabled anyone to use web technologies (with underlying implementation in Rust & WebAssembly) to control the Arch animations and makes the light display interactive. The result was fun and colorful — and it gave developers a chance to interact with unfamiliar new technologies.

Mozilla News and Microsoft's Antitrust Push Against Linux/Android

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Android
Microsoft
Moz/FF
  • Biggest Mistakes with CSS Grid

    It’s easy to make lots of mistakes with a new technology, especially something that’s as big of a change from the past as CSS Grid. In this video, I explain the 9 Biggest Mistakes people are making, with advice and tips for avoiding these pitfalls and breaking old habits.

  • In loving memory of Abbackar DIOMANDE

    It brings us great sadness to share with you the recent news about one of our dear Rep we will so fondly remember. Abbackar DIOMANDE from Ivory Coast is unfortunately no longer with us.

    Diomande, was a Mozillian from Bouake, Ivory Coast and was contributing in various Mozilla projects including SUMO and L10n.
    He was a local community builder, that helped to build a healthy local community in his country while lately he had also taken the role of a Resources Rep, helping his fellow Mozillians on organizing local initiatives.

  • Mozilla Partners with Women Who Tech to Offer Startup Challenge Europe Award for Privacy, Transparency & Accountability

    The Women Startup Challenge Europe will connect women technology innovators from cities across Europe to compete for $60,000 in cash grants. In addition to the funding, all finalists will also receive: pitch coaching, one on one meetings with investors the day after the Women Startup Challenge, and other crucial startup friendly services. The Startup Challenge, co-hosted by the Office of Paris Mayor Anne Hidalgo, will feature 10 finalists pitching their ventures before a panel of judges on October 25, 2018 at Paris Hôtel de Ville.

    Women Who Tech is a nonprofit organization on a mission to close the funding gap and disrupt a culture and economy that has made it incredibly difficult for women entrepreneurs to raise capital. At Mozilla, we are committed to an internet that catalyzes collaboration among diverse communities working together for the common good. Promoting diversity and inclusion is core to our mission, so working with organizations like Women Who Tech furthers our commitment to create more diversity in innovation.

  • This Week in Rust 243

    Always wanted to contribute to open-source projects but didn't know where to start? Every week we highlight some tasks from the Rust community for you to pick and get started!

  • Mozilla Responds to European Commission’s Google Android Decision

    For Mozilla, these issues of innovation, openness, and competition speak to our history. Twenty years ago, we made Firefox to combat the vertical integration of Microsoft Windows and Internet Explorer. Today, we are again witnessing vertical integration concerns on a larger scale, with powerful players at all parts of the internet ecosystem. Mozilla’s 2018 Internet Health Report identified decentralization as a major goal to promote a healthy internet.

    Targeted, effective interventions can strengthen technology markets and are necessary to advance consumer welfare. Mozilla will continue to build competitive products and to advocate for effective policies and approaches to build a competitive and open technology ecosystem.

  • Google Fined A Record $5 Billion For Abusing Its Dominance in Android Ecosystem

    The European regulators have slapped Google with a record-breaking fine of $5 billion for breaking antitrust laws revolving around its Android operating system.

  • EU fines Google $5 billion over Android antitrust abuse

    European Union regulators have slapped Alphabet-owned Google with a record 4.34 billion euro ($5 billion) antitrust fine for abusing the dominance of its Android mobile operating system, which is by far the most popular smartphone OS in the world.

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More in Tux Machines

BSD: FreeBSD 12.0 Beta and Upgrading OpenBSD with Ansible

Graphics: XRGEARS and Arcan's Latest

  • XRGEARS: Infamous "Gears" Now On VR Headsets With OpenHMD, Vulkan
    Well, the virtual reality (VR) demo scene is now complete with having glxgears-inspired gears and Utah teapot rendering on VR head mounted displays with the new XRGEARS. Kidding aside about the gears and teapot, XRGEARS is a nifty new open-source project with real value by Collabora developer Lubosz Sarnecki. XRGEARS is a standalone VR demo application built using the OpenHMD initiative for tracking and Vulkan for rendering. XRGEARS supports both Wayland and X11 environments or even running off KMS itself. This code also makes use of VK_EXT_direct_mode_display with DRM leasing.
  • Arcan versus Xorg – Approaching Feature Parity
    This is the first article out of three in a series where I will go through what I consider to be the relevant Xorg feature set, and compare it, point by point, to how the corresponding solution or category works in Arcan. This article will solely focus on the Display Server set of features and how they relate to Xorg features, The second article will cover the features that are currently missing (e.g. network transparency) when they have been accounted for. The third article will cover the features that are already present in Arcan (and there are quite a few of those) but does not exist in Xorg.
  • Arcan Display Server Is Nearing Feature Parity With The X.Org Server
    The Arcan display server, which started off years ago sounding like a novelty with being a display server built off a game engine in part and other interesting features, is nearing feature parity with the X.Org Server. While most hobbyist display server projects have failed, Arcan has continued advancing and with an interesting feature set. Recently they have even been working on a virtual reality desktop and an interesting desktop in general. Arcan is getting close to being able to offering the same functionality as a traditional X.Org Server. If you are interested in a lengthy technical read about the differences between Arcan and X.Org, the Arcan developers themselves did some comparing and contrasting when it comes to the display support, windowing, input, font management, synchronization, and other areas.

CoC/Systemd Supremacy Over Linux Kernel

  • New Linux Code of Conduct Revisions: CoC Committee Added Plus Interpretation & Mediator
    The Linux Code of Conduct introduced last month that ended up being quite contentious will see some revisions just ahead of the Linux 4.19 stable kernel release. Greg Kroah-Hartman has outlined the planned changes as well as a new Code of Conduct Interpretation document. In the weeks since the Linux kernel CoC was merged, various patches were proposed but none merged yet. It turns out Greg KH was working in private with various kernel maintainers/developers on addressing their feedback and trying to come up with solutions to the contentious issues in private.
  • Some kernel code-of-conduct refinements
    Greg Kroah-Hartman has posted a series of patches making some changes around the newly adopted code of conduct. In particular, it adds a new document describing how the code is to be interpreted in the kernel community.
  • Systemd Adds Feature To Fallback Automatically To Older Kernels On Failure
    Systemd's latest feature is the concept of "boot counting" that will track kernel boot attempts and failures as part of an automatic boot assessment. Ultimately this is to provide automatic fallback to older kernels should a newer kernel be consistently failing. The feature was crafted over the past few months by Lennart Poettering himself to provide a way when making use of systemd-boot on UEFI systems it can automatically fallback to an older kernel if a newer kernel is consistently causing problems. This is treated as an add-on to the Boot Loader Specification. The systemd boot assessment is designed that it could also be used by non-UEFI systems and other boot platforms.

ODROID 'Hacker Board'

  • ODROID Rolling Out New Intel-Powered Single Board Computer After Trying With Ryzen
    While ODROID is most known for their various ARM single board computers (SBCs), some of which offer impressive specs, they have dabbled in x86 SBCs and on Friday announced the Intel-powered ODROID-H2. In the announcement they mentioned as well they were exploring an AMD Ryzen 5 2500U powered SBC computer, which offered fast performance but the price ended up being prohibitive. After the falling out with Ryzen over those cost concerns, they decided to go ahead with an Intel Geminilake SoC. Geminilake is slower than their proposed Ryzen board, but the price was reasonable and it ends up still being much faster than ODROID's earlier Apollolake SBC.
  • Odroid-H2 is world’s first Gemini Lake hacker board
    Hardkernel unveiled the Odroid-H2, the first hacker board with an Intel Gemini Lake SoC. The Ubuntu 18.10 driven SBC ships with 2x SATA 3.0, 2x GbE, HDMI and DP, 4x USB, and an M.2 slot for NVMe. When the Odroid-H2 goes on sale in November at a price that will be “higher than $100,” Hardkernel will join a small group of vendors that have launched a community backed x86-based SBC. This first open spec hacker board built around Intel’s new Gemini Lake SoC — and one of the first Gemini Lake SBCs of any kind — follows earlier Arm-based Odroid winners such as the Odroid-C2 Raspberry Pi pseudo clone and the octa-core Odroid-XU4.