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Moz/FF

DRM in Firefox is The End of Our Digital Security

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Moz/FF

Mozilla recently decided to add DRM in Firefox even if Mozilla hates it. Almost all video streaming websites use some kind of DRM and as Microsoft, Apple and Google has already implemented DRM in their browsers, Mozilla thinks not adding the DRM in Firefox would make it useless as a product as the user will have to switch to other browser everytime a user visits a website with DRM.

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Pale Moon: Firefox Without DRM, Interface Breakage

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Moz/FF

Pale Moon is a fork of Firefox for Windows and Linux, but it doesn't come down to a silly theming fork or other basic changes. The fundamental differences between upstream Firefox and Pale Moon is that they will not be implementing HTML5 DRM/EME support, they are sticking with the original Firefox interface rather than the new Australis UI, and they will not be accepting sponsored ad pages / tiles.

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To Serve Users

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Moz/FF

In the old science fiction story, To Serve Man (which later was adapted for the The Twilight Zone), aliens come to earth and freely share various technological advances, and offer free visits to the alien world. Eventually, the narrator, who remains skeptical, begins translating one of their books. The title is innocuous, and even well-meaning: To Serve Man. Only too late does the narrator realize that the book isn't about service to mankind, but rather — a cookbook.

It's in the same spirit that Baker seeks to serve Firefox's users up on a platter to the MPAA, the RIAA, and like-minded wealthy for-profit corporations. Baker's only defense appears to be that other browser vendors have done the same, and cites specifically for-profit companies such as Apple, Google, and Microsoft.

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Firefox’s adoption of closed-source DRM breaks my heart

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Moz/FF

Future versions of the open-source Firefox browser will include closed-source digital rights management (DRM) from Adobe, the Mozilla project’s chief technology officer, Andreas Gal, announced on Wednesday.

The purpose is to support commercial video streams. But this is a radical, disheartening development in the history of the organisation, long held out as a beacon for the open, free spirit of the web as a tool for liberation.

As Gal’s blogpost makes clear, this move was done without much enthusiasm, out of a fear that Firefox (Mozilla’s flagship product and by far the most popular free/open browser in the world) was being sidelined by Apple, Google and Microsoft’s inclusion of proprietary technology to support Netflix and other DRM-encumbered videos in their browsers.

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Mozilla wants to teach you how to teach others about the Web

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Moz/FF

Almost two years after launching its Webmaker initiative, Mozilla is launching a new online crash-course to give anyone the skills to teach other people about using and building on the Web.

It’s called Webmaker Training and features four modules covering the basics of the Internet, how to use Mozilla’s current crop of Webmaker tools, nurturing open learning and engaging with other communities on the Web.

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Mirantis Launches Vendor Database for OpenStack Cloud Computing

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Moz/FF

Mirantis is aiming to make it easier for enterprises to deploy OpenStack, the open source infrastructure for cloud computing. This week, the company launched a Web-based database listing vendors who offer OpenStack-compatible solutions.

The database is available now as a Web-based dashboard on Mirantis's website. The company derived the information on OpenStack compatibility from the OpenStack DriverLog, which keeps track of drivers and plugins that support OpenStack.

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Mozilla Decides Against Ads In The New Tab Page

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Moz/FF

In a blog post on Friday, Johnathan Nightingale as the VP of Firefox shared that they are no longer pursuing advertisements within the New Tab page. "[A lot of our community found the language hard to decipher, and worried that we were going to turn Firefox into a mess of logos sold to the highest bidder; without user control, without user benefit.] That's not going to happen. That's not who we are at Mozilla," he wrote.

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You can buys ZTE’s Firefox phone for $99 on eBay

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Moz/FF

The ZTE Open C smartphone, which was first showed off at the Mobile World Congress (MWC) tradeshow in February, is being sold on eBay for a wallet-friendly $99.99. Running the latest version of Mozilla’s open source Firefox OS, the new phone is an upgraded version of the earlier ZTE Open which was sold for $80 in the US. The unlocked smartphone packs a 4-inch screen, 1.2GHz dual-core processor, 512MB of memory, 3-megapixel camera, and 4GB of storage.

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What are the alternatives to Google Chrome and Firefox on Linux?

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Linux
Google
Moz/FF

Say what you want about web browsers on Linux, I just miss Internet Explorer. No let's be serious. A great thing about Linux distributions is in general that they come packaged with a good browser. If that browser is not your favorite, you can easily install another one (and you don't necessarily need a browser to download your favorite browser). For most users, however, this favorite browser will be Chrome or Firefox, and there are reasons for that: they are both good browsers. For more adventurous users, there is also Opera, which recently improved. But, there exist browsers out there which are a lot more exotic, with particular features and goals. I shall propose you eight examples: eight browsers which may not be as complete as Chrome or Firefox, but which are definitely worth checking out for their philosophies or design.

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Death of net neutrality: Is Mozilla barking up the wrong tree?

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Moz/FF

Net Neutrality has been quite the conversation during the last several months. Without the free flow of information, the topology of the entire Internet would be defeated in its entirety. So when Mozilla recently proposed that the FCC categorize remote delivery services as telecommunications services, I personally sympathized with the members of the well known non-profit.

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Firefox OS media-casting stick strikes Kickstarter gold

The first Firefox OS based media player has arrived on Kickstarter, in the form of a $25 open-spec HDMI stick that supports Chromecast-like content casting. The Matchstick, which has already zoomed past its Kickstarter campaign’s $100,000 funding goal, with 28 days still remaining, was teased back in June by Mozilla developer evangelist Christian Heilmann. The unnamed prototype was billed as an open source HDMI stick that runs Mozilla’s Linux-based Firefox OS and offers casting capabilities. Few details were revealed at the time except that the device used the same DIAL (DIscovery And Launch) media-casting protocol created by Netflix and popularized by Google’s Chromecast. Read more

Open source history, present day, and licensing

Looking at open source softwares particularly, this is a fact that is probably useful to you if you are thinking about business models, many people don't care about it anymore. We talk about FOSS, Free and Open Source Software, but if we really are strict there's a difference between free software and open source software. On the left, I have free software which most typically is GPL software. Software where the license insures freedom. It gives freedoms to you as a user, but it also requires that the freedoms are maintained. On the right-hand side, you have open source software which is open for all, but it also allows you to close it. So here we come back to the famous clause of the GPL license, the reciprocity requirement which says, "If I am open, you need to be open." So software that comes under the GPL license carries with it something that other people call a virus. I call it a blessing because I think it's great if all software becomes open. Read more

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