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Moz/FF

Mozilla: San Francisco 2018 All Hands, Reps Council and More

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Moz/FF
  • State of Mozilla Support: 2018 Mid-year Update – Part 4

    The San Francisco 2018 All Hands flew by and so did the last two months. I cannot tell you how grateful I am to have been able to attend this event.

    If I were to look back on some of the highlights, they would be pretty nitty gritty detailed. But I will share with you a few of them.

  • Onboarding team for 2nd half of 2018

    As we have entered the second half of the year, the Reps Council has worked on updating the Onboarding Screening Team for 2018-2.

    The scope of this team is to help on evaluating the new applications to the Reps program by helping the Reps Council on this process.

  • Mozilla B-Team: happy bmo push day!
  • DWeb: Social Feeds with Secure Scuttlebutt

    Scuttlebutt is a free and open source social network with unique offline-first and peer-to-peer properties. As a JavaScript open source programmer, I discovered Scuttlebutt two years ago as a promising foundation for a new “social web” that provides an alternative to proprietary platforms. The social metaphor of mainstream platforms is now a more popular way of creating and consuming content than the Web is. Instead of attempting to adapt existing Web technologies for the mobile social era, Scuttlebutt allows us to start from scratch the construction of a new ecosystem.

Browsers That Spy

Filed under
Google
Moz/FF
Web
  • Firefox Advance Uses Your Browser History to Recommend Web Content

    If you’re short on things to read — seriously? — be sure to check out the latest experiment in the Firefox Test Pilot program.

    It’s called Advance and it aims to ‘advance’ you past the site you’re currently gawping at and on to the next. How? By giving you a list of articles and web pages based on your browsing history, of course.

    Don’t scream. Honestly. This feature is not part of the default browser (not yet, anyway). You have to explicitly choose to enable it.

    [...]

    Now, before anyone screams “I already use this! It’s called Google Chrome!” let me stress that this is an entirely optional, opt-in feature for Firefox. You have to go out of your way to install it. It is not part of the default install. If you don’t want it, you don’t have to use it.

    You remain in control when Advance is running. You can, at any point, see what browser history Laserlike has processed and — GDPR box check — request the deletion of that information.

    Advance by Firefox limits its remit to your search history, specifically web page addresses. It doesn’t monitor what you write/say/do when using a website, or the specific content that’s on it.

  • Dev Channel Update for Desktop

    The dev channel has been updated to 70.0.3514.0 for Windows & Linux, and 70.0.3514.2 for Mac.  

  • Chrome 70 Dev Release With Shape Detection API

    While Chrome 69 was released last week, today Google has shipped their latest "dev" release of Chrome 70 for interested testers.

    New Chrome 70 dev channel releases are available today for Linux, macOS, and Windows. Key features for Chrome 70 is the introduction of the Shape Detection API, disabling some touch event APIs by default on desktop hardware, CSS Grid Layout behavior updates, WebUSB support within dedicated worker contexts, several security enhancements, and various other minor updates.

Mozilla: More on Gervase Markham and Thunderbird 60

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Moz/FF
  • In Memoriam: Gervase Markham

    Gerv was Mozilla’s first intern. He arrived in the summer of 2001, when Mozilla staff was still AOL employees. It was a shock that AOL had allocated an intern to the then-tiny Mozilla team, and we knew instantly that our amazingly effective volunteer in the UK would be our choice.

    When Gerv arrived a few things about him jumped out immediately. The first was a swollen, shiny, bright pink scar on the side of his neck. He quickly volunteered that the scar was from a set of surgeries for his recently discovered cancer. At the time Gerv was 20 or so, and had less than a 50% chance of reaching 35. He was remarkably upbeat.

    The second thing that immediately became clear was Gerv’s faith, which was the bedrock of his response to his cancer. As a result the scar was a visual marker that led straight to a discussion of faith. This was the organizing principle of Gerv’s life, and nearly everything he did followed from his interpretation of how he should express his faith.

  • Thunderbird email client gets a new look, new features, and a new logo

    A new version of Thunderbird is now available to download.

    Thunderbird 60 is the first stable release of the ephemeral desktop email client since the launch of Thunderbird 52 way back in early 2017.

    A year in development — but has it been worth the wait?

  • Mozilla Thunderbird 60.0 Ships With New Photon Look, Important Changes

    After more than one year since the previous major stable release (52.0), Mozilla Thunderbird 60.0 was released with some important changes, including a new Firefox-like "Photon" look, new logo, and attachment management improvements, among others.

    The free and open source email, news, RSS and chat client Thunderbird version 60.0 includes a Firefox-like Photon look, in which the tabs are square (and other theme improvements), along with new light and dark themes. WebExtension themes are enabled in Thunderbird with version 60, and you'll also find multiple chat themes.

Firefox Offers Recommendations with Latest Test Pilot Experiment: Advance

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Moz/FF
  • Firefox Offers Recommendations with Latest Test Pilot Experiment: Advance

    The internet today is often like being on a guided tour bus in an unfamiliar city. You end up getting off at the same places that everyone else does. While it’s convenient and doesn’t require a lot of planning, sometimes you want to get a little off the beaten path.

    With the latest Firefox experiment, Advance, you can explore more of the web efficiently, with real-time recommendations based on your current page and your most recent web history.

    With Advance we’re taking you back to our Firefox roots and the experience that started everyone surfing the web. That time when the World Wide Web was uncharted territory and we could freely discover new topics and ideas online. The Internet was a different place.

  • Firefox Test Pilot: Advancing the Web

    The web runs on algorithms. Your search results, product recommendations, and the news you read are all customized to your interests. They are designed to increase the time you spend in front of a screen, build addiction to sites and services, and ultimately maximize the number of times you click on advertisements.

    Without discounting the utility that this personalization can provide, it’s important to consider the cost: detailed portfolios of data about you are sitting on a server somewhere, waiting to be used to determine the optimum order of your social media feeds. Even if you trust that the parties collecting that data will use it responsibly, it has to live somewhere and has to be transmitted there, which makes it a juicy target for bad actors who may not act so responsibly.

Mozilla: Thunderbird 60, Firefox 62 Beta 14, Mozilla's Trusted Recursive Resolver (TRR)

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Moz/FF
  • Powerful Thunderbird 60 Email Client – Comes With Many Improvements

    Thunderbird is a free and open source Email client for Linux, Mac and Windows computers. It is a default email client for many Linux distribution. Thunderbird is a full featured Email client with features such as customization, calendars, Tasks, Reminders, Address Books and many more. Thunderbird is not only available for general users, also it is available for enterprises.

  • Firefox 62 Beta 14 Testday Results

    As you may already know, last Friday August 3rd – we held a new Testday event, for Firefox 62 Beta 14.

  • Firefox’s Trusted Recursive Resolver (TRR) may let Cloudflare and the US Government Spy on your Browsing Activity

    Mozilla Firefox is expected to introduce two new features in its next patch: DNS over HTTPs (DoH) and Trusted Recursive Resolver (TRR) which it has been testing in the web browser’s Nightly build. The latter is advocated by Mozilla with specific attention to security. This release attempts to override configured DNS servers with Cloudflare. This partnership has received stark criticism for security violation as this overhaul allows Cloudflare to access all DNS requests and the information that they entail.

Mozilla's new DNS resolution is dangerous

Filed under
Moz/FF

With their next patch Mozilla will introduce two new features to their Firefox browser they call "DNS over HTTPs" (DoH) and Trusted Recursive Resolver (TRR). In this article we want to talk especially about the TRR. They advertise it as an additional feature which enables security. We think quite the opposite: we think it's dangerous, and here's why.

Read more

Thunderbird 60 Released

Filed under
Moz/FF
Web
  • Thunderbird Release Notes

    Thunderbird version 60 is currently only offered as direct download from thunderbird.net and not as upgrade from Thunderbird version 52 or earlier. If you have installed Lightning, Mozilla's Calendar add-on, it will automatically be updated to match the new version of Thunderbird. Refer to this troubleshooting article in case of problems.

  • Thunderbird 60.0 Released With WebExtension Themes, Attachment Improvements

    For those of you that have been waiting for a big update to the Thunderbird mail/RSS client, Thunderbird 60.0 is now available with plenty of changes.

  • What’s New in Thunderbird 60

    Thunderbird 60, the newest stable release of everyone’s favorite desktop Email client, has been released. This version of Thunderbird is packed full of great new features, fixes, and changes that improve the user experience and make for a worthwhile upgrade. I’ll highlight three of the biggest changes in Thunderbird 60 in this post, check out the full release notes over on our website.

Mozilla: Address Bar and More

Filed under
Moz/FF
  • How to add the share menu to the Firefox address bar

    While working on my previous blog post, I came across another great feature you may not know about. Let’s say you use the Share menu, but opening the Page Actions menu requires too much navigation. You need quicker access!

    To add an item to the address Bar, right-click on it and select Add to Address Bar.
    To remove it, right-click on the item and select Remove from Address Bar.

  • New backend for storage.local API

    To help improve Firefox performance, the backend for the storage.local API is migrating from JSON to IndexedDB. These changes will soon be enabled on Firefox Nightly and will stabilize when Firefox 63 lands in the Beta channel. If your users switch between Firefox channels using the same profile during this time, they may experience data regression in the extensions they have previously installed.

    We recommend that users do not change Firefox channels between now and September 5, 2018. However, if they do and they contact you with questions about why their extensions are not behaving normally (such as losing saved options or other local data), please point them to this post for instructions on how to retrieve and re-import their extension data.

  • Happy BMO Push Day!
  • This Week in Mixed Reality: Issue 14

    It's been another busy week in MR land for the team. We are getting really close to releasing some fun new features.

Ctrl-Q issue or “are Firefox developers using Linux at all?”

Filed under
GNU
Linux
Moz/FF

When I started using Linux on my desktop there was only Mozilla based browsers which were usable. They had different names: Galeon, Firebird, Phoenix, Mozilla Suite and finally Firefox.

It worked better or worse but did. There were moments when on 2GB ram machine browser was using 6 gigabytes (which resulted in killing it). Then were moments when it started to be slower and slower so I moved to Google Chrome instead.

But still — Firefox had all those extensions which could do insane amount of things with how browser looks, how it works etc. But then Quantum came and changed that. Good bye all nice addons. Hope we meet in other life.

But what it has with question from post title? Simple, little, annoying thing: “Ctrl-Q” shortcut. Lovely one which everyone is using to close application they work with. Not that it does not work — it does. Perfectly. And this is a problem…

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Things Gateway 0.5

Filed under
Moz/FF
  • Things Gateway 0.5 packed full of new features, including experimental smart assistant

    The Things Gateway from Mozilla lets you directly monitor and control your home over the web, without a middleman.

    Today the Mozilla IoT team is excited to announce the 0.5 release of the Things Gateway, which is packed full of new features including customisable devices, a more powerful rules engine, an interactive floorplan and an experimental smart assistant you can talk to.

    [...]

    How to Get Involved

    To try out the latest version of the gateway, download the software image from our website to use on a Raspberry Pi. If you already have a gateway set up, you should notice it automatically update itself to the 0.5 release.

  • Mozilla Announces Things Gateway 0.5, Reddit Security Incident, Docker Moving to a New Release Cycle, Artifact Coming in November and LibreOffice 6.0.6 Now Available

    The Mozilla IoT team announced the 0.5 release of the Things Gateway this morning, which is "packed full of new features including customisable devices, a more powerful rules engine, an interactive floorplan and an experimental smart assistant you can talk to." If you want to try out this new version of the gateway, you can download it from here and use it on your Raspberry Pi. According to the press release, "A powerful new 'capabilities' system means that devices are no longer restricted to a predefined set of Web Thing Types, but can be assembled from an extensible schema-based system of 'capabilities' through our new schema repository. This means that developers have much more flexibility to create weird and wacky devices, and users have more control over how the device is used."

  • Mozilla’s Things Gateway 0.5 offers Interactive Floorplan View and a Smart Assistant

    Mozilla’s Things Gateway software just received a new update today in its version 0.5 and it offers several interesting features. These new features include support for custom devices and new protocols, safe authorisation of third party applications for accessing gateway, strengthened rules engine, an interactive floor plan view which lets the user lay out devices on the home map and most importantly, an ‘experimental’ smart assistant which can directly be spoken to.

    Things Gateway is a Project Things’ component which aims at providing everyone with the services and software required for bridging communication among connected devices. This software is an operating system which is Raspberry Pi-compatible and lets the user control and monitor their home over the internet. The latest update to the software has further expanded the controls for its users. According to Ben Francis at Mozilla Hacks, this software allows for the management of all devices being used in the house through ‘a single secure web interface’. He further wrote, “Today I’m excited to tell you about the latest version of the Things Gateway and how you can use it to directly monitor and control your home over the web, without a middleman. Instead of installing a different mobile app for every smart home device you buy, you can manage all your devices through a single secure web interface.”

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