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Moz/FF

Mozilla announces a ₹1 crore fund to support Open source projects in India

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Moz/FF
OSS

Bangalore: Mozilla has announced the launch of “Global Mission Partners: India”, an award program specifically focused on supporting open source and free software.

The new initiative builds on the existing “Mission Partners” program. Applicants based in India can apply for funding to support any open source/free software projects which significantly further Mozilla’s mission.

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Firefox Using Client Side Decoration, AdNauseam Blocked

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Moz/FF
  • Firefox Using Client Side Decoration (Video)

    If you’ve been longing to see some progress on Firefox GTK header bar support you’re going to want to feast your eyes on this.

    Alex of WOGUE fame has posted a new video to showcase Firefox CSD as it looks and works right now.

    Now, he had to build (painfully, I hear) >from Git to try this out, but his video shows “all upstream work from Mozillians [and] no patches!”.

  • AdNauseam extension blocked

    Since proponents of this extension will likely be unhappy or have questions as to why, and likely want to be vocal about this addition:

    After investigating the AdNauseam extension's behavior and the results for web publishers, the extension has been added to the Pale Moon blocklist with a severity level of 2 (meaning you won't be able to enable it unless you increase the blocking level in about:config to 3). For those unfamiliar with this extension: it generates false ad "clicks" to ad servers in an attempt to generate "noise" for the ad networks in a protest against the advertising network system as a whole.
    While the premise behind this is similar to poisoning trackers with false fingerprints (which we are proponents of, ourselves), and we normally let users decide for themselves what they want to do with their browser, we are strictly against allowing extensions that cause direct damage (including damage to third parties). There is a subtle but important difference between blocking content and generating fake user interaction.

Mozilla: FCC and Project Quantum

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Moz/FF
  • The Battle to Save Net Neutrality: A Panel with Tom Wheeler, Ro Khanna, Mozilla, Leading TV Producers and Others

    In May, the FCC voted to move forward with plans to gut net neutrality. It was a decision met with furor: Since then, many millions of Americans have written, phoned and petitioned the FCC, demanding an internet that belongs to individual users, not broadband ISP gatekeepers. And scores of nonprofits and technology companies have organized to amplify Americans’ voices.

    The first net neutrality public comment period ends on August 30, and the FCC is moving closer to a vote.

    So on Monday, September 18, Mozilla is gathering leaders at the forefront of protecting net neutrality. We’ll discuss why it matters, what lies ahead, and what can be done to protect it.

  • Inside a super fast CSS engine: Quantum CSS (aka Stylo)

    You may have heard of Project Quantum… it’s a major rewrite of Firefox’s internals to make Firefox fast. We’re swapping in parts from our experimental browser, Servo, and making massive improvements to other parts of the engine.

  • Mozilla's Push For Super Fast CSS With Quantum/Stylo

    Since the end of July Stylo has been available via Firefox Nightly as the Rust-written Servo CSS style system. For those curious about this modern CSS system and the broader effort as part of bringing Servo/Quantum components to Firefox, Mozilla has out an interesting blog post.

Firefox 54: Speed, customization and future

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Moz/FF

Ever since Mozilla embarked on the Chrome-me-up journey a few years ago, my enthusiasm took on a six-weekly decline cadence, with each new release of the Firefox browser bringing in more of what Firefox shouldn't be and less of what made it such a cool program in the hands of its loyal users. But the best is yet to come. The true rite of passage. Only the most righteous will survive. WebExtensions.

While trying to salvage some of what it still has left while actively scuppering its fanbase and killing off its powerful extension mechanism, Mozilla is working on giving its browser a breath of fresh air. More speed, it seems, as though it is the critical factor that made people abandon ship. But assuming it is, does it make a difference? Let's test.

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Old Firefox add-ons get 'dead man walking' call

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Moz/FF

The end of legacy Firefox plugins is drawing closer, with Mozilla's Jorge Villalobos saying they'll be disabled in an upcoming nightly build of the browser's 57th edition.

While he didn't specify just how soon the dread date will arrive, Villalobos writes: “There should be no expectation of legacy add-on support on this or later versions”.

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Mozilla Firefox 55 Brings Virtual Reality to the Web

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Moz/FF

If you are setting up WordPress on a new Linux VPS for the first time you may face some problems like missing some PHP extensions. One example is missing the MySQL extension and this is a common problem since the extension doesn't come by default with many operating systems. In this tutorial we will help you to fix the problem with the missing extension and complete the WordPress installation successfully.

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More on Firefox 55

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Moz/FF
  • Mozilla Firefox 55 Web Browser Is Now Available to Download, Here's What's New

    It's not yet official, but the Firefox 55.0 open-source and cross-platform web browser is now available for download on GNU/Linux, macOS, and Microsoft Windows operating systems.

    Mozilla will make the release of Firefox 55 official on August 8, 2017, but you can get an early taste right now by downloading the binary or source packages for supported OSes from Mozilla's FTP servers if you can't wait to update your Firefox web browser through OTA updates.

    And it just happens that we got our hands on the preliminary release notes that were seeded on the Beta channel since Firefox 55 entered development on June 14, 2017. Thirteen RCs later and the final release of Firefox 55.0 is now ready to be savored on your favorite operating system.

  • Firefox 55 Released, This Is What’s New

    Firefox 55 features a number of welcome improvements in memory usage and startup time, and offers 'search suggestions' in the URL bar.

  • Firefox Is Better, For You. WebVR and new speedy features launching today in Firefox

    Perhaps you’re starting to see a pattern – we’re working furiously to make Firefox faster and better than ever. And today we’re shipping a new release that’s our best yet, one that introduces exciting, empowering new technologies for creators as well as improves the everyday experience for all Firefox users.

    [...]

    Are you a tab hoarder? As part of our Quantum Flow project to improve performance, we’ve significantly reduced the time it takes to start Firefox when restoring tabs from a previous session. Just how much faster are things now? Mozillian Dietrich Ayala ran an interesting experiment, comparing how long it takes to start various versions of Firefox with a whopping 1,691 tabs open. The end result? What used to take nearly eight minutes, now takes just 15 seconds.

Mozilla Firefox 55 Web Browser Is Now Available to Download, Here's What's New

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Moz/FF
Web

It's not yet official, but the Firefox 55.0 open-source and cross-platform web browser is now available for download on GNU/Linux, macOS, and Microsoft Windows operating systems.

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Review of Mozilla’s Send and How to Try Firefox Nightly

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Moz/FF

Mozilla: Firefox Logo and NoScript’s Migration to WebExtensions APIs

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Moz/FF
  • Firefox May Be Getting a New Logo

    Firefox 57 is shaping up to be one of the browser’s biggest and most important releases in its history.

    Projects, technologies and changes like Quantum Flow, Quantum Compositor, Stylo, Photon, WebRender, and WebExtensions sees almost every inch of the browser benefit from a refit or refresh.

  • NoScript’s Migration to WebExtensions APIs

    We asked Giorgio Maone, developer of the popular security extension NoScript, to share his experience about migrating to WebExtension APIs. Originally released in 2005, NoScript was developed to address security vulnerabilities in browsers by pre-emptively blocking scripts from untrusted websites. Over the time it grew into a security suite including many additional and often unique countermeasures against various web-based threats, such as Cross-Site Scripting (XSS), Cross-Site Request Forgery (CSRF) and Clickjacking.

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More in Tux Machines

Linux 4.15-rc4

So it looks like 4.15 is finally calming down, with rc4 being about average size-wise for this time in the release process. Of course, we not only have the holiday season coming up, we *also* have some x86 entry and page table handling fixes pending. But that's not for today, and not for rc4. Let's enjoy the short normal phase of 4.15 today. The most noticeable thing to most normal users in rc4 is that we should finally have cleaned up and fixed the suspend/resume handling. That got first broken for some (unusual) kernel configurations due to excessive debugging at a very inopportune time in early resume, and when _that_ got fixed, we broke the 32-bit case. Not many developers run 32-bit builds in real life any more, so that took a bit to even notice. Read more Also:Linux 4.15-rc4 Kernel Released

Kali Linux 2017.3 hands-on: The best alternative to Raspbian for your Raspberry Pi

Linux distributions designed for security analysis, penetration testing, and forensic analysis are all the rage these days. It seems like you can hardly swing a dead cat (or a dead computer) without hitting one. As a dedicated Linux user I consider that to be a good thing, simply because choice is always good, and it is always good to have several groups of talented and dedicated people working on something. But as a long-time user of Kali Linux (and BackTrack before that) I honestly believe that Kali is still the best in the field, so I am always pleased when I hear there is a new Kali release. Read more

Sri Lanka advised to go for open source software in schools

The Asian Development Bank has advised Sri Lanka to go for open source software as opposed to branded software in using Information and Communication Technology (ICT) in education. “Software is a prime concern in learning. Therefore, open source is recommended for a developing country like Sri Lanka to achieve international quality standards of ICT education,” the ADB said in a recent study. “Free and open source software provides a greatly flexible environment - economically, operationally, and technically - to implement ICT applications in education.” Administrative authorities of the school education system should be motivated and provided with guidelines for the use of free and open source software in the school environment, said the study on opportunities of ICT for education equity, quality, and efficiency in South Asia. Read more

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