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Moz/FF

Mark Surman: New Mozilla Foundation Executive Director

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Moz/FF

blog.lizardwrangler: I’m thrilled to announce that Mark Surman is joining the Mozilla Foundation as our new Executive Director. Mark joins us after a long period of getting to know — and being known by — Mozilla contributors.

Three Firefox extensions for Gmail

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Moz/FF

linux.com: Gmail, Google's popular Web mail application, is already full of useful features all on its own. But Firefox users can further customize Gmail with a variety of add-ons. Some only change the appearance, while others add functionality that makes Gmail more like a personal planner than just a plain old email application. Let's take a look at three Firefox add-ons for Gmail.

From Firefox to Flock... and back!

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Moz/FF

blogspot.com: Flock is "The" Social Web Browser. Take Mozilla's Firefox, insert native del.icio.us, gmail, blogger and flickr support (to name just a few) and you'll have something close to what Flock has to offer. It is like a Firefox special edition packed full of extensions but, because they are tightly integrated and tested with the code, you'll get a stable and really powerfull browser for all your internet social needs. Kind of.

Dogs hide bones, Firefox hides useful tricks

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Moz/FF

downloadsquad.com: Firefox is one of those applications that's so hard to write about, because there may be little tricks and shortcuts I've been using for some time, and someone will discover one and say, "Hey, that rocks! Why didn't anyone tell me?"

The LXF Guide: Top 10 Firefox add-ons

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Moz/FF

linuxformat.co.uk: Firefox 3 may have introduced a number of new features, but it is the ability to add extra functionality with the use of extensions that remains one of its biggest assets. There are hundreds of extensions to choose from -

Firefox 3.1 beta freeze delayed until September 9

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Moz/FF

blogs.zdnet.com: The beta of Firefox 3.1 has been pushed back to mid September. At the Mozilla group’s weekly meeting Tuesday, one developer said “there is a big gap between the features planned for 3.1 and what will make it if we freeze on the 19th.”

Also: Mozilla Developer News for Aug 12

Interview: Qt Comes to Mozilla and Firefox

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Software
Interviews
Moz/FF

dot.kde.org: Developers from Nokia and Mozilla have been working hard to port the Mozilla Platform and Firefox to Qt and there are now some solid results available. The plan is to merge the Qt branch into the central Mozilla branch to make the port official.

Firefox Wins the “Who’s the Next Open Source Idol”

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Moz/FF

businesswire.com (PR): GroundWork Open Source, Inc. (www.groundworkopensource.com), announced today Mozilla’s Firefox was successful in beating out the other three contestants, reigning champion “Tux” the Linux kernel penguin, “Beastie” the BSD demon and the GNU “Gnu” to become the world’s favorite Open Source Idol.

First Look: Mozilla Snowl

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Moz/FF

webworkerdaily.com: Now this all sounds very lovely, but it’s kinda ‘meh’ - all Snowl seems to do is chop up some message data into a different presentation, there doesn’t seem to be any intelligence in analyzing the patterns of communications.

Mozilla reveals the Firefox of the future?

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Moz/FF

pcpro.co.uk: Mozilla has unveiled a spectacular new concept browser, dubbed Aurora. The bleeding-edge browser is part of a new Mozilla Labs initiative, in which the open-source foundation is encouraging people to contribute ideas and designs for the browser of the future.

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More in Tux Machines

Uselessd: A Stripped Down Version Of Systemd

The boycotting of systemd has led to the creation of uselessd, a new init daemon based off systemd that tries to strip out the "unnecessary" features. Uselessd in its early stages of development is systemd reduced to being a basic init daemon process with "the superfluous stuff cut out". Among the items removed are removing of journald, libudev, udevd, and superfluous unit types. Read more

Open source is not dead

I don’t think you can compare Red Hat to other Linux distributions because we are not a distribution company. We have a business model on Enterprise Linux. But I would compare the other distributions to Fedora because it’s a community-driven distribution. The commercially-driven distribution for Red Hat which is Enterprise Linux has paid staff behind it and unlike Microsoft we have a Security Response Team. So for example, even if we have the smallest security issue, we have a guaranteed resolution pattern which nobody else can give because everybody has volunteers, which is fine. I am not saying that the volunteers are not good people, they are often the best people in the industry but they have no hard commitments to fixing certain things within certain timeframes. They will fix it when they can. Most of those people are committed and will immediately get onto it. But as a company that uses open source you have no guarantee about the resolution time. So in terms of this, it is much better using Red Hat in that sense. It’s really what our business model is designed around; to give securities and certainties to the customers who want to use open source. Read more

10 Reasons to use open source software defined networking

Software-defined networking (SDN) is emerging as one of the fastest growing segments of open source software (OSS), which in itself is now firmly entrenched in the enterprise IT world. SDN simplifies IT network configuration and management by decoupling control from the physical network infrastructure. Read more

Only FOSSers ‘Get’ FOSS

Back on the first of September I wrote an article about Android, in which I pointed out that Google’s mobile operating system seems to be primarily designed to help sell things. This eventually led to a discussion thread on a subreddit devoted to Android. Needless to say, the fanbois and fangrrls over on Reddit didn’t cotton to my criticism and they devoted a lot of space complaining about how the article was poorly written. Read more