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Moz/FF

TenFourFox FPR10b1 and Firefox Push Notifications in Vista 10

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Moz/FF
  • TenFourFox FPR10b1 available

    TenFourFox Feature Parity 10 beta 1 is now available (downloads, hashes, release notes). This version is mostly about expanded functionality, adding several new DOM and JavaScript ES6 features, and security changes to match current versions of Firefox. Not everything I wanted to get done for this release got done, particularly on the JavaScript side (only one of the ES6 well-known symbols updates was finished in time), but with Firefox 63 due on the 22nd we'll need this period for sufficient beta testing, so here it is.

    The security changes include giving document-level (i.e., docshell) data: URIs unique origins to reduce cross-site scripting attack surface (for more info, see this Mozilla blog post from Fx57). This middle ground should reduce issues with the older codebase and add-on compatibility problems, but it is possible some historical add-ons may be affected by this and some sites may behave differently. However, many sites now assume this protection, so it is important that we do the same. If you believe a site is behaving differently because of this, toggle the setting security.data_uri.unique_opaque_origin to false and restart the browser. If the behaviour changes, then this was the cause and you should report it in the comments. This covers most of the known exploits of the old Firefox behaviour and I'll be looking at possibly locking this down further in future releases.

  • Mozilla Firefox Collabs With Windows 10 Action Center for Push Notifications

    Similar to other browsers, Firefox supports push notifications but for some reason, it never used the Microsoft Windows 10 Action center for notifications. However, that is about to change with the in-development Mozilla Firefox build 64, as reported by Tech Radar.

    The browser is getting updated soon to support Windows 10 Action Center for notifications. The aim here is to improve the overall user experience and make it seamless to access your notifications from Mozilla Firefox.

Mozilla and Chrome: WebP, WebAssembly and Google Chrome Alternatives

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Google
Moz/FF
Web
  • Mozilla Firefox Embracing Google’s Image Format After 8 Years

    Google brought its WebP Image Format to compete with PNG and JPEG back in 2010. The images using WebP are usually 45% smaller in size than PNG and JPEF which is great for websites as it helps reduce page load times.

    Firefox had remained rebellious to WebP until now. The browser now supports WebP, 8 years after it became a standard for Google Chrome and Chromium based browsers such as Opera.

    Mozilla originally rejected the use to WebP claiming that it doesn’t offer enough improvements, The browser supported JPEG and PNG while evaluating the use of Google’s image format every now and then.

    At this point, the format is only supported on Windows PCs and Android-based devices. Support for iOS devices such as Mac won’t roll out until the first half of 2019, according to Mozilla.

  • Calls between JavaScript and WebAssembly are finally fast

    At Mozilla, we want WebAssembly to be as fast as it can be.

    This started with its design, which gives it great throughput. Then we improved load times with a streaming baseline compiler. With this, we compile code faster than it comes over the network.

    So what’s next?

    One of our big priorities is making it easy to combine JS and WebAssembly. But function calls between the two languages haven’t always been fast. In fact, they’ve had a reputation for being slow, as I talked about in my first series on WebAssembly.

  • 10 Best Google Chrome Alternatives

    Google Chrome dominates the browser market worldwide with a massive 60% share, leaving the rest to other web browsers. To be honest, Chrome provides a really good web browsing experience with a seamless functioning across multiple devices. However, we all know that such a smooth experience comes at a cost — our personal data.

    We know that Google tracks us relentlessly and the onslaught of personalized ads gets really annoying at some point. Even if we keep it aside, there are serious problems like heavy RAM usage that makes your device sluggish. So whatever may be your reason to leave Chrome and seek other options, here is a list of best Google Chrome alternatives for you.

Mozilla on VR

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Moz/FF
  • Close Conversation is the Future of Social VR

    In many user experience (UX) studies, the researchers give the participants a task and then observe what happens next. Most research participants are earnest and usually attempt to follow instructions. However, in this study, research participants mostly ignored instructions and just started goofing off with each other once they entered the immersive space and testing the limits of embodiment.

    The goal of this blog post is to share insights from Hubs by Mozilla usability study that other XR creators could apply to building a multi-user space.

    The Extended Mind recruited pairs of people who communicate online with each other every day, which led to testing Hubs with people who have very close connections. There were three romantic partners in the study, one pair of roommates, and one set of high school BFFs. The reason that The Extended Mind recruited relatively intimate pairs of people is because they wanted to understand the potential for Hubs as a communication platform for people who already have good relationships. They also believe that they got more insights about how people would use Hubs in a natural environment rather than bringing in one person at a time and asking that person to hang out in VR with a stranger who they just met.

    The two key insights that this blog post will cover are the ease of conversation that people had in Hubs and the playfulness that they embodied when using it.

  • Drawing and Photos, now in Hubs

    As we covered in our last update, we recently added the ability for you to bring images, videos, and 3D models into the rooms you create in Hubs. This is a great way to bring content to view together in your virtual space, and it all works right in your browser.

    We’re excited to announce two new features today that will further enrich the ways you can connect and collaborate in rooms you create in Hubs: drawing and easy photo uploads.

    Hubs now has a pen tool you can use at any time to start drawing in 3D space. This is a great way to express ideas, spark your creativity, or just doodle around. You can draw by holding the pen in your hand if you are in Mixed Reality, or draw using your PC’s mouse or trackpad.

Google/Chrome and Mozilla Firefox Leftovers

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Google
Moz/FF
Web
  • 10 Productivity Gmail Extensions for Your Browser

    Gmail is used by 500+ million people but how many of us make the best use of it? Yes, it’s a convenient email client to use but what if I told you that Gmail is capable of way more functions than it offers you at the moment?

    The same way applications use plugins is the same way Gmail does, and here are 10 that will boost your productivity.

  • How is Crosh Different From the Linux Terminal on a Chromebook?

    As of Chrome OS 69, support for Linux applications is a baked in part of the operating system. Once enabled, this installs the Terminal on your Chrome OS system, but what is it and how does it compare to Crosh?

    Don’t worry if all that sounds like gibberish to you—if you’ve never spent any time poking around in your Chromebook’s guts, then you’ve likely never used (or even heard of) Crosh. And if you’ve never used Linux before, well, then you’ve never had to bother with the Terminal. The good news is that we’re going to make sense of both things today.

    [...]

    The Terminal and Crosh are similar tools—in fact, they’re the same basic concept, but the Terminal is specifically for the Linux aspect of Chrome OS, where Crosh is for the Chrome OS side.

    You’d be forgiven if that doesn’t make a lot of sense right out of the gate—they’re both running on the same machine, at the same time after all. But they’re not connected.

    One of the biggest benefits of Chrome OS is its enhanced security. As a result, most things on the operating system run in an independent sandbox. That means that most elements don’t really interact with each other—for example, if a single tab suffers a failure and crashes, the other tabs in the browser window aren’t affected.

  • Helping you to tackle the midterms on your terms

    For many people, a confusing tangle of cyberjargon and misinformation have combined to make the idea of turning to the web for election information a weird proposition.

    [...]

    We’re doing this to make it easy for people across the political spectrum to participate this November and beyond.

    We want to help make sure that the web isn’t being used to manipulate, misinform, and limit you from accessing all the information you need to make an informed choice.

    In addition to the Firefox election tools, we have other resources to help you.

  • WebRender newsletter 24

    Hi there, this your twenty fourth WebRender newsletter. A lot of work in progress this week, so the change list is pretty short. To compensate I added a list of noteworthy ongoing work which hasn’t landed yet is but will probably land soon and gives a rough idea of what’s keeping us busy.

Mozilla: WebPush Shield Study, Firefox Mania, Bleach 3.0.0 and This Week in Rust 254

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Moz/FF
  • Upcoming WebPush Shield Study

    WebPush does more than let you know you’ve got an upcoming calendar appointment or bug you about subscribing to a site’s newsletter (particularly one you just visited and have zero interest in doing). Turns out that WebPush is a pretty good way for us to do a number of things as well. Things like let you send tabs from one install of Firefox to another, or push out important certificate updates. We’ll talk about those more when we get ready to roll them out, but for now, we need to know if some of the key bits work.

    One of the things we need to test is if our WebPush servers are up to the job of handling traffic, or if there might be any weird issue we might not have thought of. We’ve run tests, we’ve simulated loads, but honestly, nothing compares to real life for this sort of thing.

    In the coming weeks, we’re going to be running an experiment. We’ll be using the Shield service to have your browser set up a web push connection. No data will go over that connection aside from the minimal communication that we need. It shouldn’t impact how you use Firefox. Chances are, you won’t even notice we’re doing this.

  • Firefox got maniac

    I don’t know what, I don’t know why, but Firefox behaves completely maniac on one of my computers. Opening simple tabs beats up 4 Web Content threads to nearly 100% CPU time, switching tabs the same.

  • Bleach v3.0.0 released!

    Bleach 3.0.0 focused on easing the problems with the html5lib dependency and fixing regressions created in the Bleach 2.0 rewrite

  • This Week in Rust 254

    Every week the team announces the 'final comment period' for RFCs and key PRs which are reaching a decision. Express your opinions now.

Mozilla: ESLint, The Things Gateway, Distributed Teams, Uplift, MDN

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Moz/FF
  • What’s next for ESLint on Firefox Source Code?

    Around 2015 a couple of projects had started using ESLint in mozilla-central. In the last quarter of 2015, there was a big push to enable ESLint for browser/ and toolkit/ – the two main directories containing the javascript source behind Firefox.

    Since then, we have come a long way. We have commands and hooks for developers to use, checks during the review phase, and automatic tests that run against our review tools and our continuous integration branches. Not only that, but we’ve also expanded our coverage to more directories, and expanded the amount of rules that are enabled.

    As we’ve done this work, we’ve caught lots of bugs in the code or in our tests (there’s much more than just those links). Some of those have been small, some have been user facing issues. There are also now the countless potential bugs that we don’t get to see where ESLint catches issues for us before they even hit the core source trees. All this helps to save developer time and leaves more for fixing bugs and implementing new features.

  • The Things Gateway - A Pythonic Rule System

    In my last post, I talked about the features and limitations of the Rules System within the Things Gateway by Mozilla graphical user interface. Today, I'm going to show an alternate rule system that interacts with the Things Gateway entirely externally using the Web Thing API. The Web Thing API enables anyone armed with a computer language that can use Web Sockets to create entirely novel applications or rules systems that can control the Things Gateway.

    In the past few months, I've blogged several times about controlling the Things Gateway with the Web Thing API using Python 3.6. In each one was a stand alone project, opening and managing Web Sockets in an asynchronous programming environment. By writing these projects, I've explored both functional and object oriented idioms to see how they compare. Now with some experience, I feel free to abstract some of the underlying common aspects to create a rule engine of my own.

  • Distributed Teams: Regional Holidays

    Today is German Unity Day, Germany’s National Day. Half of my team live in Berlin, so I vaguely knew they wouldn’t be around… but I’d likely have forgotten if not for a lovely tradition of “Holiday Inbound” emails at Mozilla.

    Mozilla is a broadly-distributed organization with employees in dozens of countries worldwide. Each of these countries have multiple days off to rest or celebrate. It’s tough to know across so many nations and religions and cultures exactly who will be unable to respond to emails on exactly which days.

  • Uplift forms get a refresh

    Firefox is shipped using a train model. Without going into too much details, this means that we maintain several channel in parallel (Nightly, Beta, Release and ESR). Normal changes happen in Nightly. When a change needs to be cherry-picked from Nightly to another branch, the process is called “Uplift”.

    Uplifting is a key tool in the Firefox release management world. When developers want to apply a patch from Nightly to another branch, they will use Bugzilla, answering some questions in a textarea.

  • A New Way to Support MDN

    Starting this week, some visitors may notice something new on the MDN Web Docs site, the comprehensive resource for information about developing on the open web.

    We are launching an experiment on MDN Web Docs, seeking direct support from our users in order to accelerate growth of our content and platform. Not only has our user base grown exponentially in the last few years (with corresponding platform maintenance costs), we also have a large list of cool new content, features, and programs we’d like to create that our current funding doesn’t fully cover.

    In 2015, on our tenth anniversary (read about MDN’s evolution in the 10-year anniversary post), MDN had four million active monthly users. Now, just three years later, we have 12 million. Our last big platform update was in 2013. By asking for, and hopefully receiving, financial assistance from our users – which will be reinvested directly into MDN – we aim to speed up the modernization of MDN’s platform and offer more of what you love: content, features, and integration with the tools you use every day (like VS Code, Dev Tools, and others), plus better support for the 1,000+ volunteers contributing content, edits, tooling, and coding to MDN each month.

Mozilla: Mojolicious, CSS, MDN, Android Users and Desktop

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Moz/FF
  • happy bmo push day – mojolicious edition

    As previously announced at FOSDEM 2018 and then re-announced at MojoConf, bugzilla.mozilla.org is now running on Mojolicious “A next generation web framework for the Perl programming language”

    This release incorporates 28 changes and the Mojolicious migration is the least interesting to the end-user, but it is pretty important in terms of being able to deliver rich experiences moving forward.

  • Supporting Referrer Policy for CSS in Firefox 64

    Navigating from one webpage to another or requesting a sub-resource within a webpage causes a web browser to send the top-level URL in the HTTP referrer field. Inspecting that HTTP header field on the receiving end allows sites to identify where the request originated which enables sites to log referrer data for operational and statistical purposes. As one can imagine, the top-level URL quite often includes user sensitive information which then might leak through the referrer value impacting an end users privacy.

  • Hack on MDN: Better accessibility for MDN Web Docs

    Hack on MDN events evolved from the documentation sprints for MDN that were held from 2010 to 2013, which brought together staff members and volunteers to write and localize content on MDN over a weekend. As implied by the name, “Hack on MDN” events expand the range of participants to include those with programming and design skills. In its current incarnation, each Hack on MDN event has a thematic focus. One in March of this year focused on browser compatibility data.

    The Hack on MDN format is a combination of hackathon and unconference; participants pitch projects and commit to working on concrete tasks (rather than meetings or long discussions) that can be completed in three days or less. People self-organize to work on projects in which a group can make significant progress over a long weekend. Lightning talks provide an unconference break from projects.

  • New Firefox Focus comes with search suggestions, revamped visual design and an under-the-hood surprise for Android users

    When we first launched Firefox Focus, we wanted to quickly deliver a streamlined private browsing experience for your mobile device. Since then, we’ve been pleasantly surprised by how many people use Focus for more than just private browsing and we’ve made Focus better with a thoughtful set of features based on what our users are telling us. Custom tabs, tracker counter, full screen mode and so much more have been the result. Today, we’re pleased to announce another big update with another much-requested feature, a design refresh, and an exciting change to the underlying technology behind Focus for Android.

  • Working on Firefox desktop developer efficiency

    Mozilla is an engineering company. Its interface to—and impact on—the world is through its primary product, the Firefox web browser. Firefox is of course created, maintained, and improved by Mozilla’s developers (both employees and community members). Thus, when one increases Firefox developer efficiency and velocity the velocity of the Firefox product increases. Because Firefox is Mozilla’s primary product, an increase in Firefox product velocity transitively increases the velocity of the company and the mission overall.

Mozilla: Firefox 63 Beta 10, Firefox Nightly, October’s Featured Extensions and Privacy

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Moz/FF
  • QMO: Firefox 63 Beta 10 Testday Results
  • Firefox Nightly: These Weeks in Firefox: Issue 46
  • October’s Featured Extensions
  • ndian Supreme Court rules on Aadhaar: Delayed scrutiny

    The Aadhaar judgment holds important lessons (and warnings) for how courts and the polity should respond to the technological vision of the state. The task before the Supreme Court was to evaluate the constitutionality of a specific choice and design of technology made by the government. Note that this choice, of a single biometric identifier for each resident linked to a centralised database, was made almost a decade ago. And decisions about this project have largely evolved within the closed quarters of the executive, including the one to roll it out, and the subsequent call to link Aadhaar to essential services. All this was done without any statutory backing, until its hurried passage as a money bill in 2016.

    As one reads through the decision of the three judges that formed the majority opinion, it becomes clear that there are limits to this delayed judicial scrutiny of a technology-driven project that has already reached scale (over 99% of the population is already enrolled). While the judgment does well to impose limits on its scope, it disappoints in its reluctance to engage with its underlying technical and evidentiary claims, and the application of weak legal standards.

Mozilla: European Commission Contributions, Hubs by Mozilla, Localisation, DevTools GCLI

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Moz/FF
  • Contributing to the European Commission’s review of digital competition

    Following on the heels of our submission to the U.S. Federal Trade Commission last month, we have submitted a written filing to the European Commission Directorate-General for Competition, as part of a public consultation in advance of the Commission’s forthcoming January 2019 conference on competition challenges in the digital era. In our filing, we focus on two specific, related issues: the difficulty of measuring competitive harm in a data-powered and massively vertically integrated digital ecosystem, and the role played by interoperability (in particular, through technical interfaces known as APIs) in powering the internet as we know it.

    Mozilla’s Internet Health Report 2018 explored concentration of power and centralization online through a spotlight article, “Too big tech?” The software and services offered by a few companies are entangled with virtually every part of our lives. These companies reached their market positions in part through massive innovation and investment, and they created extremely popular (and lucrative) user experiences. But we are headed today down a path of excessive centralisation and control, where someday the freedom to code and compete will be realised in full only for those who work for a few large corporations.

  • Hubs by Mozilla: Immersive Communication on Any Device

    Hubs by Mozilla lets people meet in a shared 360-environment using just their browser. Hubs works on any device from head-mounted displays like HTC Vive to 2D devices like laptops and mobile phones. Using WebVR, a JavaScript API, Mozilla is making virtual interactions with avatars accessible via Firefox and other browser that people use every day.

    In the course of building the first online social platform for VR and AR on the web, Mozilla wanted confirm it was building a platform that would bring people together and do so in a low-friction, safe, and scalable way. With her years of experience and seminal studies examining the successes and pitfalls of social VR systems across the ecosystem, Jessica Outlaw and Tyesha Snow of The Extended Mind, set out to generate insights about the user experience and deliver recommendations of how to improve the Hubs product.

  • Support Localization – Top 50 Sprint and More

    I hope you can still remember that last month we kicked off a “Top 20 Sprint” for several locales available on the Support site. You can read more about the reasons behind it here and the way it had been going here.

    In September, the goal has been extended to include a wider batch of articles that quality into the “Top 50” – that is, the 50 most popular Knowledge Base articles globally. You can see their list on this dashboard: https://support.mozilla.org/en-US/contributors/kb-overview

    I wanted to share with you the progress our community has made over the last weeks and call out those who have contributed towards Mozilla’s broader linguistic coverage of support content, making all the possible versions of Firefox easier to use for millions of international users.

  • The Developer Toolbar (or GCLI) is no longer in DevTools

    The DevTools GCLI has been removed from the Firefox codebase (bug), which roughly translates into 20k less lines of code to think about, and the associated tests which are not running anymore, so yay for saving both brain and automation power!

    We triaged all the existing bugs, and moved a bunch worth keeping to DevTools → Shared Components, to avoid losing track of them (they’re mostly about taking screenshots). Then the ever helpful Emma resolved the rest as incomplete, and moved the component to the DevTools Graveyard in Bugzilla, to avoid people filing bugs about code that does not exist anymore.

    During this removal process we’ve heard from some of you that you miss certain features from GCLI, and we’ve taken note, and will aim to bring them back when time and resourcing allow. In the meantime, thank you for your feedback! It helps us better understand how you use the tools.

Mozilla: Privacy Settings, Recovery Keys and WebRender Progress

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Moz/FF
  • 25,000 Americans Urge Venmo to Update Its Privacy Settings

    Earlier this week, Mozilla visited Venmo’s headquarters in New York City and delivered a petition signed by more than 25,000 Americans. The petition urges the payment app to put users’ privacy first and make Venmo transactions private by default.

    Also this week: A new poll from Mozilla and Ipsos reveals that 77% of respondents believe payment apps should not make transaction details public by default. (More on our poll results below.)

    Millions of Venmo users’ spending habits are available for anyone to see. That’s because Venmo transactions are currently public by default — unless users manually update their settings, anyone, anywhere can see whom they’re sending money to, and why.

    Mozilla’s petition urges Venmo to change these settings. By making privacy the default, Venmo can better protect its seven million users — and send a powerful message about the importance of privacy. But so far, Venmo hasn’t formally responded to our petition and to the 25,000 Americans who signed their names.

  • Mozilla Firefox Account Gets A New Recovery Key Option For Forgotten Passwords

    The Mozilla team has announced a new recovery key option for Firefox accounts that can be used to access Firefox data if users forget their passwords.

    Starting today, users will be able to generate a one-time recovery key associated with their account. Once the key is used to access the account, it becomes invalid, and the user needs to create another one.

    [...]

    Sync encrypts the user’s browser data on a local computer by using Firefox account password. It then sends this encrypted data to Mozilla’s servers for storage making sure that no one can access it without the user’s password (which acts as a decryption key here).

  • WebRender newsletter #23

    Bonjour everyone! Here comes the twenty third installment of WebRender’s very best newsletter. This time I’m trying something a bit different. Instead of going through each pull request and bugzilla entry that landed since the last post, I’m only sourcing information from the team’s weekly meeting. As a result only the most important items make it to the list and not all items have links to their bug or pull request. Doing this allows me to spend considerably less time preparing the newsletter and will hopefully help with publishing it more often.

    Last time I mentioned WebRender being enabled on nightly by default for a small subset of the users, focusing on nVidia desktop GPUs on Windows 10. I’m happy to report that we didn’t set our nightly user population on fire and that WebRender is still enabled in these configurations (as expected, sure, but with a project as large and ambitious as WebRender it isn’t something that could be taken for granted). The choice of this particular configuration of hardware and driver led to a lot of speculation online, so I just want clarify a few things. We did not strike any deal with nVidia. nVidia didn’t send engineers to help us get WebRender to work on their hardware first. No politics, I promise. We learnt from past mistakes and chose to target a small population of Firefox users at first specifically because it is small. Each combination of OS/Vendor/driver exposes its own set of bugs and a progressive and targeted rollout means we’ll be better equipped to react in a timely manner to incoming bugs than we have been with past projects.
    Worry not, the end game is for WebRender to be Firefox’s rendering engine for everyone. Until then, are welcome to enable WebRender manually if your OS, hardware or driver isn’t in the initial target.

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More in Tux Machines

BSD: FreeBSD 12.0 Beta and Upgrading OpenBSD with Ansible

Graphics: XRGEARS and Arcan's Latest

  • XRGEARS: Infamous "Gears" Now On VR Headsets With OpenHMD, Vulkan
    Well, the virtual reality (VR) demo scene is now complete with having glxgears-inspired gears and Utah teapot rendering on VR head mounted displays with the new XRGEARS. Kidding aside about the gears and teapot, XRGEARS is a nifty new open-source project with real value by Collabora developer Lubosz Sarnecki. XRGEARS is a standalone VR demo application built using the OpenHMD initiative for tracking and Vulkan for rendering. XRGEARS supports both Wayland and X11 environments or even running off KMS itself. This code also makes use of VK_EXT_direct_mode_display with DRM leasing.
  • Arcan versus Xorg – Approaching Feature Parity
    This is the first article out of three in a series where I will go through what I consider to be the relevant Xorg feature set, and compare it, point by point, to how the corresponding solution or category works in Arcan. This article will solely focus on the Display Server set of features and how they relate to Xorg features, The second article will cover the features that are currently missing (e.g. network transparency) when they have been accounted for. The third article will cover the features that are already present in Arcan (and there are quite a few of those) but does not exist in Xorg.
  • Arcan Display Server Is Nearing Feature Parity With The X.Org Server
    The Arcan display server, which started off years ago sounding like a novelty with being a display server built off a game engine in part and other interesting features, is nearing feature parity with the X.Org Server. While most hobbyist display server projects have failed, Arcan has continued advancing and with an interesting feature set. Recently they have even been working on a virtual reality desktop and an interesting desktop in general. Arcan is getting close to being able to offering the same functionality as a traditional X.Org Server. If you are interested in a lengthy technical read about the differences between Arcan and X.Org, the Arcan developers themselves did some comparing and contrasting when it comes to the display support, windowing, input, font management, synchronization, and other areas.

CoC/Systemd Supremacy Over Linux Kernel

  • New Linux Code of Conduct Revisions: CoC Committee Added Plus Interpretation & Mediator
    The Linux Code of Conduct introduced last month that ended up being quite contentious will see some revisions just ahead of the Linux 4.19 stable kernel release. Greg Kroah-Hartman has outlined the planned changes as well as a new Code of Conduct Interpretation document. In the weeks since the Linux kernel CoC was merged, various patches were proposed but none merged yet. It turns out Greg KH was working in private with various kernel maintainers/developers on addressing their feedback and trying to come up with solutions to the contentious issues in private.
  • Some kernel code-of-conduct refinements
    Greg Kroah-Hartman has posted a series of patches making some changes around the newly adopted code of conduct. In particular, it adds a new document describing how the code is to be interpreted in the kernel community.
  • Systemd Adds Feature To Fallback Automatically To Older Kernels On Failure
    Systemd's latest feature is the concept of "boot counting" that will track kernel boot attempts and failures as part of an automatic boot assessment. Ultimately this is to provide automatic fallback to older kernels should a newer kernel be consistently failing. The feature was crafted over the past few months by Lennart Poettering himself to provide a way when making use of systemd-boot on UEFI systems it can automatically fallback to an older kernel if a newer kernel is consistently causing problems. This is treated as an add-on to the Boot Loader Specification. The systemd boot assessment is designed that it could also be used by non-UEFI systems and other boot platforms.

ODROID 'Hacker Board'

  • ODROID Rolling Out New Intel-Powered Single Board Computer After Trying With Ryzen
    While ODROID is most known for their various ARM single board computers (SBCs), some of which offer impressive specs, they have dabbled in x86 SBCs and on Friday announced the Intel-powered ODROID-H2. In the announcement they mentioned as well they were exploring an AMD Ryzen 5 2500U powered SBC computer, which offered fast performance but the price ended up being prohibitive. After the falling out with Ryzen over those cost concerns, they decided to go ahead with an Intel Geminilake SoC. Geminilake is slower than their proposed Ryzen board, but the price was reasonable and it ends up still being much faster than ODROID's earlier Apollolake SBC.
  • Odroid-H2 is world’s first Gemini Lake hacker board
    Hardkernel unveiled the Odroid-H2, the first hacker board with an Intel Gemini Lake SoC. The Ubuntu 18.10 driven SBC ships with 2x SATA 3.0, 2x GbE, HDMI and DP, 4x USB, and an M.2 slot for NVMe. When the Odroid-H2 goes on sale in November at a price that will be “higher than $100,” Hardkernel will join a small group of vendors that have launched a community backed x86-based SBC. This first open spec hacker board built around Intel’s new Gemini Lake SoC — and one of the first Gemini Lake SBCs of any kind — follows earlier Arm-based Odroid winners such as the Odroid-C2 Raspberry Pi pseudo clone and the octa-core Odroid-XU4.