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Moz/FF

Mozilla: Firefox 71 Beta 12 Testday and Privacy Debate

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Moz/FF
  • Firefox 71 Beta 12 Testday – November 22nd

    We are happy to let you know that Friday, November 22nd, we are organizing Firefox 71 Beta 12 Testday. We’ll be focusing our testing on: Inactive CSS.

    Check out the detailed instructions via this gdoc.

    *Note that this events are no longer held on etherpad docs since public.etherpad-mozilla.org was disabled.

  • Mozilla Privacy Blog: Mozilla Mornings on the future of openness and data access in the EU

    On 10 December, Mozilla will host the next installment of our Mozilla Mornings series – regular breakfast meetings where we bring together policy experts, policymakers and practitioners for insight and discussion on the latest EU digital policy developments.

    The next installment will focus on openness and data access in the European Union. We’re bringing together an expert panel to discuss how the European Commission should approach a potential framework on data access, sharing and re-use.

Mozilla Firefox News and Opera Release

Filed under
Moz/FF
Web
  • 2019 Add-ons Community Meetup in London

    At the end of October, the Firefox add-ons team hosted a day-long meetup with a group of privacy extension developers as part of the Mozilla Festival in London, UK. With 2019 drawing to a close, this meetup provided an excellent opportunity to hear feedback from developers involved in the Recommended Extensions program and to get input about some of our plans for 2020.

    [...]

    We recently announced that Firefox Preview, Mozilla’s next generation browser for Android built on GeckoView, will support extensions through the WebExtensions API. Members of the Android engineering team will build select APIs needed to initially support a small set of Recommended Extensions.

    The group discussed a wishlist of features for extensions on Android, including support for page actions and browser actions, history search, and the ability to manipulate context menus. These suggestions will be considered as work on Firefox Preview moves forward.

  • Here’s why pop culture and passwords don’t mix

    Were they on a break or not?! For nearly a decade, Ross and Rachel’s on-screen relationship was a point of contention for millions of viewers around the world. It’s no surprise to learn that years after the series finale, they are not only TV’s most beloved characters, but their names are popular account passwords, too. That’s right. More than thousands of internet users love Rachel, Monica, Joey, Chandler, Ross and Phoebe enough to use their names as passwords.

    Wondering about trends, we turned to haveibeenpwned (HIBP) — the website that aggregates data from known breaches — for pop culture favorites. (Firefox Monitor draws from HIBP to help people learn if they’ve been caught up in a data breach and take steps to protect themselves.)

    We couldn’t access any data files, browse lists of passwords or link passwords to logins — that info is inaccessible and kept secure — but we could look up random bad passwords manually on HIBP. It turns out, quite a lot of sitcom and sports fans are using pop culture passwords for their accounts. These bad passwords are not only weak, they have also been breached. Here’s what we spotted.

  • Adding CodeQL and clang to our Bug Bounty Program

    One of the ways we’re supporting this initiative at Mozilla is through renewed investment in automation and static analysis. We think the broader Mozilla community can participate, and we want to encourage it. Today, we’re announcing a new area of our bug bounty program to encourage the community to use the CodeQL tools.  We are exploring the use of CodeQL tools and will award a bounty – above and beyond our existing bounties – for static analysis work that identifies present or historical flaws in Firefox.

  • Opera Browser 65 Released with Redesigned Address Bar

    Opera web browser 65 was released a day ago with redesigned address bar, improved tracker blocker, and new bookmarks panel.

  • Opera 65 Launches with Much-Improved Tracker Blocker, Redesigned Address Bar

    Opera Software announced today the general availability of the Opera 65 web browser for desktop platforms, including GNU/Linux, macOS, and Windows, a release that brings a bunch of enhancements and new features.
    Based on Chromium 78, the Opera 65 web browser is here and it's better than ever, brining a much-improved tracker blocker that finally lets you see which trackers are tracking your digital footprint while you're surfing the Internet.

    Based on the EasyPrivacy Tracking Protection list, Opera's tracker blocker feature will now show you all the trackers following you and let you take action against them if you believe some aren't good for you.

    By default, the tracker blocker will automatically block known tracker scripts to speed up the loading of pages and keep your online activity private. In Opera 65, the built-in tracker blocker can be toggled on and off per site too.

Thermostats, Locks and Extension Add-ons – WebThings Gateway 0.10

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Moz/FF

Happy Things Thursday! Today we are releasing WebThings Gateway 0.10. If you have a gateway using our Raspberry Pi builds then it should already have automatically updated itself.

This new release comes with support for thermostats and smart locks, as well as an updated add-ons system including extension add-ons, which enable developers to extend the gateway user interface. We’ve also added localisation settings so that you can choose your country, language, time zone and unit preferences. From today you’ll be able to use the gateway in American English or Italian, but we’re already receiving contributions of translations in different languages!

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Upcoming notification permission changes in Firefox 72

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Moz/FF

Notifications. Can you keep count of how many websites or services prompt you daily for permission to send notifications? Can you remember the last time you were thrilled to get one?

Earlier this year we decided to reduce the amount of unsolicited notification permission prompts people receive as they move around the web using the Firefox browser. We see this as an intrinsic part of Mozilla’s commitment to putting people first when they are online.

In preparation, we ran a series of studies and experiments. We wanted to understand how to improve the user experience and reduce annoyance. In response, we’re now making some changes to the workflow for how sites ask users for permission to send them notifications. Firefox will require explicit user interaction on all notification permission prompts, starting in Firefox 72.

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Mozilla: Librsvg, Bytecode Alliance, and Extensions in Firefox 71

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Moz/FF
  • CSS in librsvg is now in Rust, courtesy of Mozilla Servo

    Summary: after an epic amount of refactoring, librsvg now does all CSS parsing and matching in Rust, without using libcroco. In addition, the CSS engine comes from Mozilla Servo, so it should be able to handle much more complex CSS than librsvg ever could before.

  • Librsvg Continues Rust Conquest, Pulls In CSS Parsing Code From Mozilla Servo

    For about three years now GNOME's SVG rendering library has been transitioning to Rust. This library, librsvg, now makes further use of Rust around its CSS parsing code and Mozilla's Servo is doing some of that heavy lifting.

    Librsvg is employing the CSS engine from Mozilla's Servo engine in order to be written in Rust while also having the benefit of being able to handle more complex CSS code than the previous implementation.

  • Announcing the Bytecode Alliance: Building a secure by default, composable future for WebAssembly

    Today we announce the formation of the Bytecode Alliance, a new industry partnership coming together to forge WebAssembly’s outside-the-browser future by collaborating on implementing standards and proposing new ones. Our founding members are Mozilla, Fastly, Intel, and Red Hat, and we’re looking forward to welcoming many more.

  • New Bytecode Alliance Brings the Security, Ubiquity, and Interoperability of the Web to the World of Pervasive Computing

    The Bytecode Alliance is a newly-formed open source community dedicated to creating new software foundations, building on standards such as WebAssembly and WebAssembly System Interface (WASI). Mozilla, Fastly, Intel, and Red Hat are founding members.

    The Bytecode Alliance will, through the joint efforts of its contributing members, deliver a state-of-the-art runtime environment and associated language toolchains, where security, efficiency, and modularity can all coexist across the widest possible range of devices and architectures. Technologies contributed and collaboratively evolved through the Alliance leverage established innovation in compilers, runtimes, and tooling, and focus on fine-grained sandboxing, capabilities-based security, modularity, and standards such as WebAssembly and WASI.

  • Mozilla + Intel + Red Hat Form The Bytecode Alliance To Run WebAssembly Everywhere

    Mozilla, Fastly, Intel, and Red Hat have announced the Bytecode Alliance as a new initiative built around WebAssembly and focused on providing a secure-by-default bytecode that can run from web browsers to desktops to IoT/embedded platforms.

    "Together, we’re putting in solid, secure foundations that can make it safe to use untrusted code, no matter where you’re running it—whether on the cloud, natively on someone’s desktop, or even on a tiny IoT device," announced Mozilla.

  • Extensions in Firefox 71

    Firefox 71 is a light release in terms of extension changes. I’d like to tell you about a few interesting improvements nevertheless.

    Thanks to Nils Maier, there have been various improvements to the downloads API, specifically in handling download failures. In addition to previously reported failures, the browser.downloads.download API will now report an error in case of various 4xx error codes. Similarly, HTTP 204 (No Content) and HTTP 205 (Reset Content) are now treated as bad content errors. This makes the API more compatible with Chrome and gives developers a way to handle these errors in their code. With the new allowHttpErrors parameter, extensions may also ignore some http errors when downloading. This will allow them to download the contents of server error pages.

Events: Open Source Summit & Embedded Linux Conference, Hacktoberfest, Red Hat Forum, Supercon

Filed under
KDE
Red Hat
Moz/FF
OSS
  • Using Heaptrack and Hotspot

    Some weeks ago at the Open Source Summit & Embedded Linux Conference there was also a talk by David about using heaptrack and hotspot. Since these tools are extremely valuable, I thought I’d blog to make these tools a bit more visible in the KDE community.

  • Hacktoberfest 2019

    I've been marking student submissions in my open source course this weekend, and with only a half-dozen more to do, the procrastinator in me decided a blog post was in order.

    Once again I've asked my students to participate in Hacktoberfest. I wrote about the experience last year, and wanted to give an update on how it went this time.

    I layer a few extra requirements on the students, some of them to deal with things I've learned in the past. For one, I ask them to set some personal goals for the month, and look at each pull request as a chance to progress toward achieving these goals. The students are quite different from one another, which I want to celebrate, and this lets them go in different directions, and move at different paces.

  • Obsidian joins Red Hat Forums in South Africa to highlight the power of open source

    Leading open source technology and services provider Obsidian Systems has confirmed its participation as a silver sponsor of the EMEA Red Hat Forum 2019. This will be held at Century City Conference Centre in Cape Town on November 19 and at the Gallagher Convention Centre in Johannesburg on two days later.

    The Red Hat Forum is an opportunity for business leaders to deep dive into the opportunities represented by technology and technology trends including open source cloud computing, platforms, virtualisation, middleware, storage and system management.

    “We endorse the central theme of the Red Hat Forum which is that in as far as establishing a firm technical foundation for your business, the thinking and rationale around strategy should be flexibility, achieving scale, expansion and clever control,” said Muggie van Staden, Managing Director of Obsidian Systems.

    “Interoperability, adjustability and elasticity – these are the hallmarks of a market that is fast maturing and ready to benefit from hybrid cloud, from Linux and containers, and positioning the business to build using open source infrastructure.”

  • Supercon Keynote: Dr. Megan Wachs On RISC-V

    The RISC-V isn’t a particular chip, but rather it’s a design for how a CPU works, and a standard for the lowest-level language that the machine speaks. In contrast to proprietary CPUs, RISC-V CPUs from disparate vendors can all use the same software tools, unifying and opening their development. Moreover, open hardware implementations for the silicon itself mean that new players can enter the space more easily, bring their unique ideas to life faster, and we’ll all benefit. We can all work together.

    It’s no coincidence that this year’s Supercon badge has two RISC-V cores running in its FPGA fabric. When we went shopping around for an open CPU core design, we had a few complete RISC-V systems to pick from, full compiler and development toolchains to write code for them, and of course, implementations in Verilog ready to flash into the FPGA. The rich, open ecosystem around RISC-V made it a no-brainer for us, just as it does for companies making neural-network peripherals or even commodity microcontrollers. You’ll be seeing a lot more RISC-V systems in the near future, on your workbench and in your pocket.

    We’re tremendously excited to hear more about the project from the inside, and absolutely looking forward to Megan’s keynote speech!

Mozilla: Localisation, DNS over HTTPs (DoH) and Restricting Notification Permission Prompts in Firefox

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Moz/FF
  • Mozilla Reps Community: Rep of the Month – October 2019

    Shina is from Pune, Maharashtra, India. Her journey started with the Mozilla Pune community while she was in college in 2017, with Localization in Hindi and quality assurance bugs.

    She’s been an active contributor to the community and since then has helped a lot of newcomers in their onboarding and helping them understand better what the Mozilla Community is all about.

  • Asking Congress to Examine the Data Practices of Internet Service Providers

    At Mozilla, we work hard to ensure our users’ browsing activity is protected when they use Firefox. That is why we launched enhanced tracking protection this year – to safeguard users from the pervasive online tracking of personal data by ad networks and companies. And over the last two years, Mozilla, in partnership with other industry stakeholders, has been working to develop, standardize, and deploy DNS over HTTPs (DoH). Our goal with DoH is to protect essentially that same browsing activity from interception, manipulation, and collection in the middle of the network.

    This dedication to protecting your browsing activity is why today we’ve also asked Congress to examine the privacy and security practices of internet service providers (ISPs), particularly as they relate to the domain name services (DNS) provided to American consumers. Right now these companies have access to a stream of a user’s browsing history. This is particularly concerning in light of to the rollback of the broadband privacy rules, which removed guardrails for how ISPs can use your data. The same ISPs are now fighting to prevent the deployment of DoH.

  • Mozilla Future Releases Blog: Restricting Notification Permission Prompts in Firefox

    In April we announced our intent to reduce the amount of annoying permission prompts for receiving desktop notifications that our users are seeing on a daily basis. To that effect, we ran a series of studies and experiments around restricting these prompts.

    [...]

    Most of the heavy lifting here was done by Felix Lawrence, who performed a thorough analysis of the data we collected. You can read his full report for our Firefox Release study. I will highlight some of the key takeaways:

    Notification prompts are very unpopular. On Release, about 99% of notification prompts go unaccepted, with 48% being actively denied by the user. This is even worse than what we’ve seen on Nightly, and it paints a dire picture of the user experience on the web. To add from related telemetry data, during a single month of the Firefox 63 Release, a total of 1.45 Billion prompts were shown to users, of which only 23.66 Million were accepted. I.e, for each prompt that is accepted, sixty are denied or ignored. In about 500 Million cases during that month, users actually spent the time to click on “Not Now”.

    Users are unlikely to accept a prompt when it is shown more than once for the same site. We had previously given websites the ability to ask users for notification every time they visit a site in a new tab. The underlying assumption that users would want to take several visits to make up their minds turns out to be wrong. As Felix notes, around 85% of prompts were accepted without the user ever having previously clicked “Not Now”.

    Most notification prompts don’t follow user interaction. Especially on Release, the overall number of prompts that are already compatible with this intervention is very low.

    Prompts that are shown as a result of user interaction have significantly better interaction metrics. This is an important takeaway. Along with the significant decrease in overall volume, we can see a significantly better rate of first-time allow decisions (52%) after enforcing user interaction on Nightly. The same can be observed for prompts with user interaction in our Release study, where existing users will accept 24% of first-time prompts with user interaction and new users would accept a whopping 56% of first-time prompts with user interaction.

Mozilla: Bazel, TLS and Decentralisation

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Moz/FF
  • evaluating bazel for building firefox, part 2

    In our last post, we highlighted some of the advantages that Bazel would bring. The remote execution and caching benefits Bazel bring look really attractive, but it’s difficult to tell exactly how much they would benefit Firefox. I looked for projects that had switched to Bazel, and a brief summary of each project’s experience is written below.

    The Bazel rules for nodejs highlight Dataform’s switch to Bazel, which took about 2 months. Their build involves some combination of “NPM packages, Webpack builds, Node services, and Java pipelines”. Switching plus enabling remote caching reduced the average time for a build in CI from 30 minutes to 5 minutes; incremental builds for local development have been “reduced to seconds from minutes”. It’s not clear whether the local development experience is also hooked up to the caching infrastructure as well.

  • Validating Delegated Credentials for TLS in Firefox

    At Mozilla we are well aware of how fragile the Web Public Key Infrastructure (PKI) can be. From fraudulent Certification Authorities (CAs) to implementation errors that leak private keys, users, often unknowingly, are put in a position where their ability to establish trust on the Web is compromised. Therefore, in keeping with our mission to create a Web where individuals are empowered, independent and safe, we welcome ideas that are aimed at making the Web PKI more robust. With initiatives like our Common CA Database (CCADB), CRLite prototyping, and our involvement in the CA/Browser Forum, we’re committed to this objective, and this is why we embraced the opportunity to partner with Cloudflare to test Delegated Credentials for TLS in Firefox, which is currently undergoing standardization at the IETF.

    As CAs are responsible for the creation of digital certificates, they dictate the lifetime of an issued certificate, as well as its usage parameters. Traditionally, end-entity certificates are long-lived, exhibiting lifetimes of more than one year. For server operators making use of Content Delivery Networks (CDNs) such as Cloudflare, this can be problematic because of the potential trust placed in CDNs regarding sensitive private key material. Of course, Cloudflare has architectural solutions for such key material but these add unwanted latency to connections and present with operational difficulties. To limit exposure, a short-lived certificate would be preferable for this setting. However, constant communication with an external CA to obtain short-lived certificates could result in poor performance or even worse, lack of access to a service entirely.

    The Delegated Credentials mechanism decentralizes the problem by allowing a TLS server to issue short-lived authentication credentials (with a validity period of no longer than 7 days) that are cryptographically bound to a CA-issued certificate. These short-lived credentials then serve as the authentication keys in a regular TLS 1.3 connection between a Firefox client and a CDN edge server situated in a low-trust zone (where the risk of compromise might be higher than usual and perhaps go undetected). This way, performance isn’t hindered and the compromise window is limited. For further technical details see this excellent blog post by Cloudflare on the subject.

  • Tantek Çelik: #Redecentralize 2019 Session: Decentralized Identity & Rethinking Reputation

    On Friday 2019-10-25 I participated in Redecentralize Conference 2019, a one-day unconference in London, England on the topics of decentralisation, privacy, autonomy, and digital infrastructure.

    I gave a 3 minute lightning talk, helped run an IndieWeb standards & methods session in the first open slot of the day, and participated in two more sessions. The second open session had no Etherpad notes, so this post is from my one week ago memory recall.

    [...]

    We did not get into any deep discussions of any specific decentralized identity systems, and that was perhaps ok. Mostly there discussion about the downsides of centrally controlled identity, and how each of us wanted more control over various aspects of our online identities.

    For anyone who asked, I posited that a good way to start with decentralized identity was to buy and use a personal domain name for your primary online presence, setting it up to sign-into sites, and build a reputation using that. Since you can pick the domain name, you can pick whatever facet(s) of your identity you wish to represent. It may not be perfectly distributed, however it does work today, and is a good way to explore a lot of the questions and challenges of decentralized identity.

Mozilla and Chromium Leftovers

Filed under
Google
Moz/FF
Web
  • The Lounge on Dokku

    Mozilla has hosted an enterprise instance of IRCCloud for several years now, and it’s been a great client to use with our IRC network. IRCCloud has deprecated their enterprise product and so Mozilla recently decommissioned our instance. I then saw several colleagues praising The Lounge as a good self-hosted alternative. I became even more interested when I saw that the project maintains a docker image distribution of their releases. I now have an instance running and I’m using irc.mozilla.org via this client and I agree with my colleagues: it’s a decent replacement.

  • Mozilla Addons Blog: Firefox to discontinue sideloaded extensions

    Sideloading is a method of installing an extension in Firefox by adding an extension file to a special location using an executable application installer. This installs the extension in all Firefox instances on a computer.

    Sideloaded extensions frequently cause issues for users since they did not explicitly choose to install them and are unable to remove them from the Add-ons Manager. This mechanism has also been employed in the past to install malware into Firefox. To give users more control over their extensions, support for sideloaded extensions will be discontinued.

    During the release cycle for Firefox version 73, which goes into pre-release channels on December 3, 2019 and into release on February 11, 2020, Firefox will continue to read sideloaded files, but they will be copied over to the user’s individual profile and installed as regular add-ons. Sideloading will stop being supported in Firefox version 74, which will be released on March 10, 2020. The transitional stage in Firefox 73 will ensure that no installed add-ons will be lost, and end users will gain the ability to remove them if they chose to.

  • Facebook Is Still Failing at Ad Transparency (No Matter What They Claim)

    Yesterday, Jack Dorsey made a bold statement: Twitter will cease all political advertising on the platform. “Internet political ads present entirely new challenges to civic discourse: machine learning-based optimization of messaging and micro-targeting, unchecked misleading information, and deep fakes. All at increasing velocity, sophistication, and overwhelming scale,” he tweeted.

    Later that day, Sheryl Sandberg responded: Facebook doesn’t have to cease political advertising… because the platform is “focused and leading on transparency.” Sandberg cited Facebook’s ad archive efforts, which ostensibly allow researchers to study the provenance and impact of political ads.

  • Chrome 79 Beta Adds The WebXR Device API For VR On The Web

    Following last week's release of Chrome 78, Google today promoted Chrome 79 to their beta channel.

    The Chrome 79 Beta most notably comes with WebXR Device API support for supporting VR head-mounted displays from the browser. The WebXR Device API will be the cross-browser standard for VR content on the web.

Firefox tips for Fedora 31

Filed under
Red Hat
Moz/FF

Fedora 31 Workstation comes with a Firefox backend moved from X11 to Wayland by default. That’s just another step in the outgoing effort of moving to Wayland. This affects Gnome on Wayland only. There is a firefox-wayland package available to activate the Wayland backend on other desktop environments (KDE, Sway)

Wayland architecture is completely different than X11. The team merged various aspects of Firefox internals to the new protocol where possible. However, some X11 features are missing completely. For such cases you can install and run firefox-x11 package as a fallback.

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More in Tux Machines

Servers: Kubernetes, Red Hat, USENET and Solaris

  • HPE launches container platform, aims to be 100% open source Kubernetes

    Hewlett Packard Enterprise launched its HPE Container Platform, a Kubernetes container system designed to run both cloud and on-premises applications. On the surface, HPE Container Platform will face an uphill climb as all the top cloud providers have Kubernetes management tools and instances and IBM with Red Hat has a big foothold for hybrid cloud deployments and the container management that goes with it. HPE, which recently outlined a plan to make everything a service, is betting that the HPE Container Platform can differentiate itself based on two themes. First, HPE is pledging that its container platform will be 100% open source Kubernetes compared to other systems that have altered Kubernetes. In addition, HPE Container Platform will be able to run across multiple environments and provide one management layer.

  • Virtio-networking: first series finale and plans for 2020

    Let's take a short recap of the Virtio-networking series that we've been running the past few months. We've covered a lot of ground! Looking at this series from a high level, let's revisit some of the topics we covered: [...] For those who didn't crack and made it all the way here, we hope this series helped you clarify the dark magic of virtio and low-level networking both in the Linux kernel and in DPDK.

  • Inside the Book of Red Hat

    Shared stories are the cornerstone of community. And in open organizations like Red Hat—where community is paramount—shared stories are especially important to the collective identity that binds participants together. At Red Hat, we're quite fond of the stories that inform our shared history, purpose, and culture. We've just collected some of them in a new version of the Book of Red Hat, which is available now. Here are just three of the community-defining moments the book recounts.

  • The Early History of Usenet, Part III: File Format

    When we set out to design the over-the-wire file format, we were certain of one thing: we wouldn't get it perfectly right. That led to our first decision: the very first character of the transmitted file would be the letter "A" for the version. Why not a number on the first line, including perhaps a decimal point? If we ever considered that, I have no recollection of it. A more interesting question is why we didn't use email-style headers, a style later adopted for HTTP. The answer, I think, is that few, if any, of us had any experience with those protocols at that time. My own personal awareness of them started when I requested and received a copy of the Internet Protocol Transition Workbook a couple of years later — but I was only aware of it because of Usenet. (A few years earlier, I gained a fair amount of knowledge of the ARPANET from the user level, but I concentrated more on learning Multics.) Instead, we opted for the minimalist style epitomized by 7th Edition Unix. In fact, even if we had known of the Internet (in those days, ARPANET) style, we may have eschewed it anyway. Per a later discussion of implementation, the very first version of our code was a shell script. Dealing with entire lines as single units, and not trying to parse headers that allowed arbitrary case, optional white space, and continuation lines was certainly simpler! [...] Sending a date and an article title were obvious enough that these didn't even merit much discussion. The date and time line used the format generated by the ctime() or asctime() library routines. I do not recall if we normalized the date and time to UTC or just ignored the question; clearly, the former would have been the proper choice. (There is an interesting discrepancy here. A reproduction of the original announcement clearly shows a time zone. Neither the RFC nor the ctime() routine had one. I suspect that announcement was correct.) The most interesting question, though, was about what came to be called newsgroups. We decided, from the beginning, that we needed multiple categories of articles — newsgroups. For local use, there might be one for academic matters ("Doctoral orals start two weeks from tomorrow"), social activities ("Reminder: the spring picnic is Sunday!"), and more. But what about remote sites? The original design had one relayed newsgroup: NET. That is, there would be no distinction between different categories of non-local articles.

  • From humble Unix sysadmin to brutal separatist suppressor to president of Sri Lanka

    A former Unix sysadmin has been elected the new president of Sri Lanka, giving hope to all those IT workers who fear they are trapped in a role where the smallest of decisions can have catastrophic consequences if it goes wrong. Gotabaya Rajapaksa, younger brother of former president Mahindra, won the popular vote in an election held on Saturday (16 November). He is notable to The Register's readership for his stint working in America as a Solaris system integrator and later as a Unix sysadmin for a Los Angeles university.

Ubuntu and Debian Picks

  • Ubuntu Weekly Newsletter 605

    Welcome to the Ubuntu Weekly Newsletter, Issue 605 for the week of November 10 – 16, 2019. The full version of this issue is available here.

  • Russell Coker: 4K Monitors

    I like having lots of terminal windows on my desktop. For common tasks I might need a few terminals open at a time and if I get interrupted in a task I like to leave the terminal windows for it open so I can easily go back to it. Having more 80*25 terminal windows on screen increases my productivity. My previous monitor was 2560*1440 which for years had allowed me to have a 4*4 array of non-overlapping terminal windows as well as another 8 or 9 overlapping ones if I needed more. 16 terminals allows me to ssh to lots of systems and edit lots of files in vi. Earlier this year I had found it difficult to read the font size that previously worked well for me so I had to use a larger font that meant that only 3*3 terminals would fit on my screen. Going from 16 non-overlapping windows and an optional 8 overlapping to 9 non-overlapping and an optional 6 overlapping is a significant difference. I could get a second monitor, and I won’t rule out doing so at some future time. But it’s not ideal.

  • SCP Foundation needs you!

    SCP is a mind-blowing, diverse, high-quality collection of writings and illustrations, all released under the CC-BY-SA free license. If you never read horror stories written with scientific style -- have a try :) [obviously this has nothing to do with OpenSSH Secure CoPy ;)]

Proprietary: CrossOver 19, ycrash and SUSE Pushing HANA

  • CROSSOVER 19 IS PROGRESSING WELL AND IS NOW IN BETA!

    It's been two weeks; we feel we owe everyone an update on our efforts to support 32 bit Windows applications on macOS Catalina, despite Apple's decision to terminate support for 32 bit applications. I'm happy to announce that we have released the first beta version of CrossOver 19 on Friday, November 15, 2019 to our community of advocates and beta testers. Further, our alpha testing and other internal testing has gone well, so I am confident that we will have a final product ready before the end of the year.

  • CrossOver 19 Enters Beta With Better Microsoft Office Support On Linux

    CodeWeavers' Jeremy White has announced that CrossOver 19 is now in beta for existing customers of this Wine-based software for running Windows programs on Linux and macOS. The biggest benefactor of CrossOver 19 is Apple macOS users with there being initial support for macOS Catalina. CrossOver/Wine needed a lot of changes to enable support for this newest version of macOS particularly for 32-bit Windows programs with Apple aiming to end 32-bit application support on their operating system.

  • Overview of ycrash – finding the source of your problem

    Take a tour of ycrash in this article by Ram Lakshmanan. ycrash helps capture critical artifacts, including garbage collection logs, thread dumps, core dumps, heap dumps, disk usage, and more when the problem happens. It applies machine learning algorithms and generates a report which gives you a complete view of the problem, down to the lines of code that caused it. The industry has seen cutting edge application performance monitoring tools (AppDynamics, NewRelic, Dynatrace…), log analysis tools (DataDog, Splunk,…). These are great tools for detecting problems. i.e. they can detect CPU spiked by x%, memory degraded by y%, response time shot up by z seconds. But they don’t answer the question: Why has the CPU spiked up? Why has memory degraded? Why has the response time increased? You still need to engage developers/architects/vendors to troubleshoot the problem and identify the root cause of the problem. ycrash captures critical artifacts (GC logs, thread dumps, core dumps, heap dumps, netstat, vmstat, lsof, iostat, top, disk usage….) when the problem happens, applies machine learning algorithms, and generates one unified root cause analysis report. This report gives you a 360-degree view of the problem. The report points out the exact class, method, and line of code that caused the problem.

  • SAP HANA is now supported on SUSE Linux Enterprise Server for SAP Applications 15 SP1

today's howtos