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Moz/FF

Mozilla Thunderbird 78.3.2 Is Now Available for Download – What’s New

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Moz/FF

Despite the adoption of Outlook increasing lately, especially among company employees and following the Office 365 suite benefitting from the remote working trend, Thunderbird continues to be one super-popular choice and it happens for good reason

Not only that it packs a super-advanced feature lineup, but Thunderbird also sports a clean and intuitive interface that can be further customized according to your preferences.

Right now, Thunderbird works on the following platforms...

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Announcing Rust 1.47.0

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Development
Moz/FF

The Rust team is happy to announce a new version of Rust, 1.47.0. Rust is a programming language that is empowering everyone to build reliable and efficient software.

If you have a previous version of Rust installed via rustup, getting Rust 1.47.0 is as easy as:

rustup update stable

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Web Alternatives, Chrome, Mozilla, and More

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Google
Moz/FF
Web
  • Simplify your web experience with this internet protocol alternative

    If you've been on the internet for a very long time or you're just very resourceful, you might remember an early text-sharing protocol called Gopher. Gopher was eventually displaced by the HTTP protocol, which of course is the basis for the modern World Wide Web. For many people, the "internet" and the "World Wide Web" are the same thing, because many people don't consciously do anything online that's not on the www subdomain.

    But there have always been a variety of network protocols to share information over an interconnected network: Telnet, FTP, SSH, Torrent, GNUnet, and many more. Recently, there's been an addition to this collection of alternatives, and it's called Gemini.

    The Gemini protocol, named after the space mission between the rudimentary experiments of Project Mercury and Project Apollo, is meant to sit peacefully between Gopher and HTTP. It doesn't aim to replace the modern web, by any means, but it does try to create both a simplified web and a modernized Gopher.

  • Browse the web using Gemini on your Apple device

    Lately, I've been checking out pages on the nascent Gemini protocol, a new application-level protocol for hypertext documents. It falls somewhere between the minimalism of Gopher and the complexity and weight of the World Wide Web.

  • Chrome 86 Released With Native File-System, WebCodecs APIs

    Chrome 86 is out today as the latest feature release to Google's cross-platform web browser.

  • about:Mozilla's #introduction channel - and how it could work for your project

    Mozilla is a large community, with dozens of projects, from Firefox front-end to localization to addons.mozilla.org to Firefox Hubs to support.mozilla.org, etc. Unsurprisingly, we have many communication channels. Bugzilla and Phabricator, Github issues and Pull Requests, Matrix/Riot/Element (formerly IRC) and Discourse, etc.

  • Get ready for virtual Halloween with Mozilla Hubs

    Halloween is around the corner and like everything in 2020, it’s probably going to be different this year. Meeting up with friends is fraught, dunking for apples is right out, and going door-to-door for candy?

    [...]

    Hosting a virtual Halloween party in Hubs is easy. Visit the Hubs website, and click on “Create a Room.” A Hubs room is where you’ll invite your friends to gather. As you enter the room, you’ll need to grant mic permission so that your friends will be able to hear you talk.

  • This Week in Glean: FOG progress report

    About a year ago chutten started the "This Week in Glean" series with an initial blog post about Glean on Desktop. Back then we were just getting started to bring Glean to Firefox Desktop. No code had been written for Firefox Desktop, no proposals had been written to discuss how we even do it.

    Now, 12 months later, after four completed milestones, a dozen or so proposal and quite a bit of code, the Project Firefox on Glean (FOG) is finally getting into a stage where we can actually use and test it. It's not ready for prime time yet, but FOG is enabled in Firefox Nightly already.

    Over the past 4 weeks I've been on and off working on building out our support for a C++ and a JavaScript API. Soon Firefox engineers will be able to instrument their code using Glean. In C++ this will look like:

Mozilla: Development, Privacy and TenFourFox

Filed under
Moz/FF
  • One Week After

    Still a lot of communications to establish again in this new role and understand who does what in the organization. It's interesting to see that in every organizations and companies I have worked, the hierarchy organization chart is not necessary helpful to understand how the products chart is organized. The communication workflow is happening in between people at many different levels. These connections are fluid and like a garden, they need a perpetual cleaning and nurturing. Slowly rebuilding some of the communications channels for webcompat.

  • Mozilla Privacy Blog: Open Letter to South Korea’s ICT Minister, Mr. Ki-Young Choe: Ensure the TBA amendments don’t harm the open internet in South Korea

    This week, as a global champion for net neutrality, Mozilla wrote to South Korea’s ICT Minister, Mr. Ki-Young Choe, to urge him to reconsider the Telecommunications Business Act (TBA) amendments. We believe they violate the principles of net neutrality and would make the South Korean internet a less open space.

    In our view, forcing websites (content providers) to pay network usage fees will damage the Korean economy, harm local content providers, increase consumer costs, reduce quality of service, and make it harder for global services to reach South Koreans. While we recognise the need for stable network infrastructure, these amendments are the wrong way to achieve that goal and will lead to South Korea to be a less competitive economy on the global stage.

  • Cameron Kaiser: TenFourFox FPR28b1 available (and a sordid tale of more Google screwery)

    TenFourFox Feature Parity Release 28 beta 1 is now available (downloads, hashes, release notes). The two most noticeable changes in this release are the triumphant return of the user-exposed "Enable JavaScript" toggle (now moved to the Tools menu), as submitted by Raphaël, and further improvements to Reader View that make it current with Firefox 82. Because the new toggle menu item requires a new locale string that can't be built from existing ones, a langpack update will also be shipped parallel with this version.

  • Cameron Kaiser: TenFourFox FPR28b1 available (and a sordid tale of more Google screwery)

    TenFourFox Feature Parity Release 28 beta 1 is now available (downloads, hashes, release notes). The two most noticeable changes in this release are the triumphant return of the user-exposed "Enable JavaScript" toggle (now moved to the Tools menu), as submitted by Raphaël, and further improvements to Reader View that make it current with Firefox 82. Because the new toggle menu item requires a new locale string that can't be built from existing ones, a langpack update will also be shipped parallel with this version.

Mozilla: OpenPGP in Thunderbird, Firefox Extension Workshop, Add-ons and Marketing

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Moz/FF
  • OpenPGP in Thunderbird

    It is a pretty rare event to see a nearly 21-year-old bug be addressed—many projects are nowhere near that old for one thing—but that is just what has occurred for the Mozilla Thunderbird email application. An enhancement request filed at the end of 1999 asked for a plugin to support email encryption, but it has mostly languished since. The Enigmail plugin did come along to fill the gap by providing OpenPGP support using GNU Privacy Guard (GnuPG or GPG), but was never part of Thunderbird. As part of Thunderbird 78, though, OpenPGP is now fully supported within the mail user agent (MUA).

    The enhancement request actually asked for Pretty Good Privacy (PGP) support; PGP is, of course, the progenitor of OpenPGP. The standards effort that resulted in OpenPGP started in 1997. Back in 1999, PGP was the only real choice for email encryption, though the initial version of GnuPG had been released a few months before the request.

    Early on, the main concerns expressed in the bug tracker were about the legality of shipping cryptographic code. The US government's attempts to restrict the export of cryptographic systems, known as the "crypto wars", were still fresh in the minds of many. It was not entirely clear that adding "munitions-grade crypto" to a MUA like Thunderbird was legal or wise. Early in 2000, the US revised its export-control regulations, which removed that particular concern.

    There was work done toward adding support for OpenPGP and Secure/Multipurpose Internet Mail Extensions (S/MIME), which is another email encryption standard, over 2000 and 2001, but the code never actually landed. Thunderbird (called "mailnews" in those days) was in fire-fighting mode; fixing bugs and getting basic functionality working took precedence over new features like encryption. There was also a need to design a reasonable plugin mechanism.

    Eventually, Enigmail showed up, which took some of the pressure off the Mozilla developers. Enigmail could be used on all of the supported platforms for Thunderbird to encrypt and decrypt PGP-style email (either inline or PGP/MIME) using GnuPG. Its initial maintainer, Ramalingam Saravanan, updated the bug with new information about Enigmail several times.

    In the bug, multiple people suggested that Enigmail be incorporated into Thunderbird and the Enigmail developers were not opposed. In 2003, Patrick Brunschwig, who was a new maintainer for the plugin, said that doing so would help in getting rid of some of the "hacks" that were done to make Enigmail work with Thunderbird. But nothing like that ever happened.

  • To Eleventy and Beyond

    In 2018, we launched Firefox Extension Workshop, a site for Firefox-specific extension development documentation. The site was originally built using the Ruby-based static site generator Jekyll. We had initially selected Jekyll for this project because we wanted to make it easy for editors to update the site using Markdown, a lightweight markup language.

    Once the site had been created and more documentation was added, the build times started to grow. Every time we made a change to the site and wanted to test it locally, it would take ten minutes or longer for the site to build. The builds took so long that we needed to increase the default time limit for CircleCI, our continuous integration and continuous delivery service, because builds were failing when they ran past ten minutes with no output.

  • Mozilla Addons Blog: Add-ons interns: developing software and careers

    For the last several years, Mozilla has participated in the Google Summer of Code and Outreachy internship programs. Both programs offer paid three-month internship opportunities to students or other industry newcomers to work on a programming project with an open source organization. This year, we were joined by Lisa Chan and Atique Ahmed Ziad, from Outreachy and Google Summer of Code, respectively.

    With mentorship from addons.mozilla.org (AMO) engineers Bob Silverberg and Andrew Williamson, Lisa built a Homepage Curation Tool to help our editorial staff easily make changes to the AMO homepage. Atique was mentored by Firefox engineers Luca Greco and Rob Wu, and senior add-on admin reviewer Andreas Wagner, and he developed a privileged extension for Firefox that monitors the activity of other installed extensions. This prototype is the starting point of a new feature that will help extension developers, add-on developers, and Firefox engineers investigate bugs in extensions or in the browser’s WebExtensions APIs.

  • The internet needs our love

    It’s noisy out there. We are inundated with sensational headlines every minute, of every day. You almost could make a full-time job of sorting the fun, interesting or useful memes, feeds and reels from those that should be trashed. It’s hard to know what to pay attention to, and where to put your energy. With so much noise, chaos and division, it seems that one of the only things we all have in common is relying on the internet to help us navigate everything that’s happening in the world, and in our lives.

    [...]

    You probably don’t know the name Mozilla. You might know Firefox. But we’ve been here, fighting for a better internet, for almost twenty years. We’re a non-profit backed organization that exists for the sole purpose of protecting the internet. Our products, like the Firefox browser, are designed with your privacy in mind. We’re here to prove that you can have an ethical tech business that works to make the internet a better place for all of us. We stand for people, not profit.

    But we can’t fight this fight alone. Big tech has gotten too big. We need you. We need people who understand what it is to be part of something larger than themselves. People who love the internet and appreciate its magic. People who are looking for a company they can support because we are all on the same side.

Mozilla and Firefox Promotion, Pale Moon Web Browser 28.14 Released

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Moz/FF
Web
  • Join the anti-establishment

    Firefox puts people first. In fact, we’re backed by a not-for-profit and our profits go back into making the internet UNFCKING BELIEVABLE FOR YOU.

    Luckily, we aren’t the only ones who believe that the internet works best when your privacy and security are protected. There are a number of us out there pushing for an internet that is powered by more than a handful of large tech companies, because we believe the more choice you have the better things are for you — and for the web. We vetted these companies for how they treat your data and for their potential to shake up things up. In short: they’re solid.

  • The internet needs our love

    It’s noisy out there. We are inundated with sensational headlines every minute, of every day. You almost could make a full-time job of sorting the fun, interesting or useful memes, feeds and reels from those that should be trashed. It’s hard to know what to pay attention to, and where to put your energy. With so much noise, chaos and division, it seems that one of the only things we all have in common is relying on the internet to help us navigate everything that’s happening in the world, and in our lives.

  • Pale Moon Web Browser 28.14 Released [Ubuntu PPA]

    Pale Moon, an open-source Goanna-based web browser, released version 28.14.0 (and 28.14.1 with quick fix) with stability and security improvements.

  • Mozilla Partners with the African Telecommunications Union to Promote Rural Connectivity

    Mozilla and the African Telecommunications Union (ATU) have signed a Memorandum of Understanding (MOU) for a joint project that will promote rural connectivity in the Africa region. “The project, pegged to the usage of spectrum policy, regulations and practices, is designed to ensure affordable access to communication across the continent,” said ATU Secretary-General John OMO. “Figuring out how to make spectrum accessible, particularly in rural areas, is critical to bringing people online throughout the African continent,” said Mitchell Baker, CEO of Mozilla, “I’m committed to Mozilla making alliances to address this challenge.”

    While half the world is now connected to the internet, the existing policy, regulatory, financial, and technical models are not fit for purpose to connect the poorer and more sparsely populated rural areas. More needs to be done to achieve the United Nations’ universal access goals by 2030. Clear policy and regulatory interventions that can support innovation, and new business models to speed up progress, are urgently required.

  • This is how we unfck the internet

    We have a once-in-a-lifetime chance to unfck the internet. We should take it. How we talk, work, and play online depends on it.

    Dramatic? No, Kardashians is dramatic. The truth is we have more than a few problems to deal with. A whole sh*tton of how we communicate is controlled by a few centi-billionaires. That’s a new word for all of us: centi-billionaire. It means worth over $100 billion USD. Each.

    [...]

    People deserve to feel safe with the knowledge that their personal information is shielded from hackers, spies and strangers. Let’s Encrypt, an alliance Mozilla helped found, now delivers greater security to over 85% of web transactions — while adding the “s” in “https://” — proving that security is possible on a large scale. With security comes trust, and trust will be the bedrock of a better internet.

Firefox 81 Gets First Point Release to Fix High Memory Bug and Improve Stability

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Moz/FF

Firefox 81.0.1 is here only a week after the launch of Firefox 81 to fix a bunch of nasty issues that could disturb your web browsing. One of the important issues addressed in this point release is a high memory bug that occurred when add-ons like Disconnect were installed, causing the web browser to become unresponsive.

Also fixed in Firefox 81.0.1 is an issue with the Picture-in-Picture (PiP) controls not being visible on web pages with audio-only elements, several issues that affected the printing functionality, the missing content on Blackboard course listings, as well as an issue with legacy preferences not being properly applied if they’re set via GPO.

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Mozilla: Firefox for Android Nightly and Surveillance ('Telemetry')

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Moz/FF
  • More Recommended extensions added to Firefox for Android Nightly

    As we mentioned recently, we’re adding Recommended extensions to Firefox for Android Nightly as a broader set of APIs become available to accommodate more add-on functionality. We just updated the collection with some new Recommended extensions, including…

    Mobile favorites Video Background Play Fix (keeps videos playing in the background even when you switch tabs) and Google Search Fixer (mimics the Google search experience on Chrome) are now in the fold.

    Privacy related extensions FoxyProxy (proxy management tool with advanced URL pattern matching) and Bitwarden (password manager) join popular ad blockers Ghostery and AdGuard.

    Dig deeper into web content with Image Search Options (customizable reverse image search tool) and Web Archives (view archived web pages from an array of search engines). And if you end up wasting too much time exploring images and cached pages you can get your productivity back on track with Tomato Clock (timed work intervals) and LeechBlock NG (block time-wasting websites).

  • Jeff Klukas: The Nitty-Gritty of Moving Data with Apache Beam

    In this session, you won’t learn about joins or windows or timers or any other advanced features of Beam. Instead, we will focus on the real-world complexity that comes from simply moving data from one system to another safely. How do we model data as it passes from one transform to another? How do we handle errors? How do we test the system? How do we organize the code to make the pipeline configurable for different source and destination systems?

    We will explore how each of these questions are addressed in Mozilla’s open source codebase for ingesting telemetry data from Firefox clients. By the end of the session, you’ll be equipped to explore the codebase and documentation on your own to see how these concepts are composed together.

  • This Week in Glean: glean-core to Wasm experiment

    On the Glean team we make an effort to move as much of the logic as possible to glean-core, so that we don’t have too much code duplication on the language bindings and guarantee standardized behaviour throughout all platforms.

    Since that is the case, it was counterintuitive for me, that when we set out to build a version of Glean for the web, we wouldn’t rely on the same glean-core as all our other language bindings. The hypothesis was: let’s make JavaScript just another language binding, by making our Rust core compile to a target that runs on the browser.

    Rust is notorious for making an effort to have a great Rust to Wasm experience, and the Rust and Webassembly working group has built awesome tools that make boilerplate for such projects much leaner.

  • Data Publishing @ Mozilla

    Mozilla’s history is steeped in openness and transparency – it’s simply core to what we do and how we see ourselves in the world. We are always looking for ways to bring our mission to life in ways that help create a healthy internet and support the Mozilla Manifesto. One of our commitments says “We are committed to an internet that elevates critical thinking, reasoned argument, shared knowledge, and verifiable facts”.

    To this end, we have spent a good amount of time considering how we can publicly share our Mozilla telemetry data sets – it is one of the most simple and effective ways we can enable collaboration and share knowledge. But, only if it can be done safely and in a privacy protecting, principled way. We believe we’ve designed a way to do this and we are excited to outline our approach here.

    Making data public not only allows us to be transparent about our data practices, but directly demonstrates how our work contributes to our mission. Having a publicly available methodology for vetting and sharing our data demonstrates our values as a company. It will also enable other research opportunities with trusted scientists, analysts, journalists, and policymakers in a way that furthers our efforts to shape an internet that benefits everyone.

Mozilla/Firefox/Tor Browser

Filed under
Moz/FF
  • New Release: Tor Browser 10.5a1

    Tor Browser 10.1a1 is now available from the Tor Browser Alpha download page and also from our distribution directory.

    Note: This is an alpha release, an experimental version for users who want to help us test new features. For everyone else, we recommend downloading the latest stable release instead.

  • Karl Dubost: Week notes - 2020 w39 - worklog - A new era

    So the Mozilla Webcompat team is entering a new era. Mike Taylor (by the time this will be published) was the manager of the webcompat team at Mozilla since August 2015. He decided to leave. Monday, September 21 was his last day. We had to file an issue about this.

    The new interim manager is… well… myself.

    So last week and this week will be a lot about: * have a better understanding of the tasks and meetings that Mike was attending. * trying to readjust schedules and understanding how to get a bit of sleep with a distributed organization which has most of its meeting toward friendly European and American time zones. Basically, all meetings are outside the reasonable working timeframe (8:00 to 17:00 Japan Time). * trying to figure out how to switch from peer to manager with the other persons in the webcompat team. I want to remove any sources of stress.

  • Mozilla Localization (L10N): L10n Report: September 2020 Edition

Web Browsing: Mozilla Firefox, Project Maelstrom and FreeTube on PCLinuxOS

Filed under
Moz/FF
Web
  • Firefox usage is down 85% despite Mozilla's top exec pay going up 400%

    One of the most popular and most intuitive ways to evaluate an NGO is to judge how much of their spending is on their programme of works (or "mission") and how much is on other things, like administration and fundraising. If you give money to a charity for feeding people in the third world you hope that most of the money you give them goes on food - and not, for example, on company cars for head office staff.

    Mozilla looks bad when considered in this light. Fully 30% of all expenditure goes on administration. Charity Navigator, an organisation that measures NGO effectiveness, would give them zero out of ten on the relevant metric. For context, to achieve 5/10 on that measure Mozilla admin would need to be under 25% of spending and, for 10/10, under 15%.

  • This is a pretty dire assessment of Mozilla

    Back to Mozilla -- in my humble but correct opinion, Mozilla should be doing two things and two things only:

    1. Building THE reference implementation web browser, and

    2. Being a jugular-snapping attack dog on standards committees.

    3. There is no 3.

  • The Talospace Project: Firefox 81 on POWER

    Firefox 81 is released. In addition to new themes of dubious colour coordination, media controls now move to keyboards and supported headsets, the built-in JavaScript PDF viewer now supports forms (if we ever get a JIT going this will work a lot better), and there are relatively few developer-relevant changes.

    This release heralds the first official change in our standard POWER9 .mozconfig since Fx67. Link-time optimization continues to work well (and in 81 the LTO-enhanced build I'm using now benches about 6% faster than standard -O3 -mcpu=power9), so I'm now making it a standard part of my regular builds with a minor tweak we have to make due to bug 1644409. Build time still about doubles on this dual-8 Talos II and it peaks out at almost 84% of its 64GB RAM during LTO, but the result is worth it.

  • What happened to BitTorrent’s Project Maelstrom web browser?

    In April 2015, BitTorrent Inc. announced the public beta of Project Maelstrom; its new experimental peer-to-peer web browser. The browser reimagined the web using the company’s name sake file-sharing protocol. Websites would be distributed equally by its visitors instead of being hosted by an expensive central webserver. The company published a beta and some blog posts, but then never mentioned Project Maelstrom again. What happened to it?

    Project Maelstrom was launched four years after Opera had launched Opera Unite (Project Alien). Unite gave everyone their own web server built right into its web browser. It enabled anyone to host a website, share photos, and do all sorts of web things like music streaming directly from their own computer. Unite failed to account for people wanting to shut their computers — now servers — off at the end of the day, however.

    BitTorrent’s Project Maelstrom sought to fix this limitation by making everyone who visited a website help contribute to its distribution! As long as someone else was hosting a copy of it, you could shut down your computer for the night without taking your website offline with it.

  • Freetube 0.7.3 added to repository

    FreeTube is a YouTube client built around using YouTube more privately. You can enjoy your favorite content and creators without your habits being tracked. All of your user data is stored locally and never sent or published to the internet. Being powered by the Invidious API, FreeTube has become one of the best methods to watch YouTube privately on the desktop.

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More in Tux Machines

Best Photo Editors for Linux

This article will cover a list of free and open-source image editors available for Linux. These applications feature basic tools for simple editing needs as well as advanced utilities for professional artists. GIMP If you are a regular Linux user, chances are that you must have heard about GIMP (GNU Image Manipulation Program) or used it to edit images. It is considered to be one of the most comprehensive, free, and open source image editing software available not only on Linux, but also on other operating systems like Windows and macOS. While some users may prefer proprietary tools like Photoshop over it, GIMP itself is packed with tons of features and can do almost everything that Photoshop is capable of. You can see all major features of GIMP available at here and here. GIMP can be extended using plugins, some of them come with the official installation while others can be downloaded from third party websites. [...] RawTherapee RawTherapee is an open source image editing software specially designed for processing and handling “raw” images. You can also import and edit image files having other formats. RawTherapee features various utilities for processing raw images including color enhancement tools, compositing and masking utilities, pixel correction tools and HDR utilities. Read more

5 Best Free and Open source NAS Software for Linux

In the 21st century, huge innovations have been made in various sectors, particularly the technological region, which has completely changed the world’s dimensions. The strides at which new technology has been developed and improved upon from its predecessors would surely be something that our ancestors would marvel at. Humans have gone in a very short time from making stone arrows and straw huts to developing smartphones and automated robots, and these advancements are continuously growing without slowing down. However, this huge transition has also brought forward some adverse effects as our machines are now subjected to more cyber-attacks and security issues. Data is one of the most important factors in the world today, and it is exactly that which is the most vulnerable. Therefore, it is necessary to implement procedures that would help in keeping your data secure. One excellent way is to use NAS software, which helps in keeping backups of your data. This shall also be the topic of our discussion in this article, where we will be looking at the top 5 free and open-source NAS software available on Linux. Read more

Pioneer DDJ-RR DJ Controller To Be Supported By The Linux 5.11 Kernel

For aspiring DJs wanting to mix beats under Linux, the Pioneer DJ DDJ-RR controller should be working come Linux 5.11 early next year. The Pioneer DDJ-RR is quite a capable ~$699 USD DJ controller that offers the mixing potential of many higher-end Pioneer DDJ devices but at a lower price point and geared for introductory DJs. The DDJ-RR is a two-channel controller and offers all of the common dedicated controls most DJs would make use of while offering high quality audio output. The DDJ-RR is designed to be used under Windows with the Rekordbox DJ software. However, this DJ controller will now work with Linux 5.11+ so it can be used with software like the open-source Mixxx DJ software package. Read more

Release notes for the Genode OS Framework 20.11

With Genode 20.11, we focused on the scalability of real-world application workloads, and nurtured Genode's support for 64-bit ARM hardware. We thereby follow the overarching goal to run highly sophisticated Genode-based systems on devices of various form factors. When speaking of real-world workloads, we acknowledge that we cannot always know the exact behavior of applications. The system must deal gracefully with many unknowns: The roles and CPU intensity of threads, the interplay of application code with I/O, memory-pressure situations, or the sudden fragility of otherwise very useful code. The worst case must always be anticipated. In traditional operating systems, this implies that the OS kernel needs to be aware of certain behavioral patterns of the applications, and has to take decisions based on heuristics. Think of CPU scheduling, load balancing among CPU cores, driving power-saving features of the hardware, memory swapping, caching, and responding to near-fatal situations like OOM. Genode allows us to move such complex heuristics outside the kernel into dedicated components. Our new CPU balancer described in Section CPU-load balancing is a living poster child of our approach. With this optional component, a part of a Genode system can be subjected to a CPU-load balancing policy of arbitrary complexity without affecting the quality of service of unrelated components, and without polluting the OS kernel with complexity. A second aspect of real-world workloads is that they are usually not designed for Genode. To accommodate the wealth of time tested applications, we need to bridge the massive gap between APIs of olde (think of POSIX) and Genode's clean-slate interfaces. Section Streamlined ioctl handling in the C runtime / VFS shows how the current release leverages our novel VFS concept for the emulation of traditional ioctl-based interfaces. So useful existing applications come to live without compromising the architectural benefits of Genode. Platform-wise, the new release continues our mission to host Genode-based systems such as Sculpt OS on 64-bit ARM hardware. This work entails intensive development of device drivers and the overall driver architecture. Section Sculpt OS on 64-bit ARM hardware (i.MX8 EVK) reports on the achievement of bringing Sculpt to 64-bit i.MX8 hardware. This line of work goes almost hand in hand with the improvements of our custom virtual machine monitor for ARM as outlined in Section Multicore virtualization on ARM. Read more Also: Genode OS Framework 20.11 Brings Dynamic CPU Load Balancing, 64-bit ARM Sculpt OS