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Moz/FF

Mozilla and Firefox Leftovers

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Moz/FF
  • This Week in Rust 365
  • This Week in Glean: Fantastic Facts and where to find them

    We have been working on Glean for a few years now, starting with an SDK with Android support and increasing our SDK platform coverage by implementing our core in Rust and providing language bindings for other platforms, well beyond the mobile space.

    Before our next major leaps (FOG, Glean.js), we wanted to understand what our internal consumers thought of Glean: what challenges are they facing? Are we serving them well?

  • Mozilla DNS over HTTPS (DoH) and Trusted Recursive Resolver (TRR) Comment Period: Help us enhance security and privacy online

    For a number of years now, we have been working hard to update and secure one of the oldest parts of the Internet, the Domain Name System (DNS). We passed a key milestone in that endeavor earlier this year, when we rolled out the technical solution for privacy and security in the DNS – DNS-over-HTTPS (DoH) – to Firefox users in the United States. Given the transformative nature of this technology and our mission commitment to transparency and collaboration, we have consistently sought to implement DoH thoughtfully and inclusively. Therefore, as we explore how to bring the benefits of DoH to Firefox users in different regions of the world, we’re today launching a comment period to help inform our plans.

  • New Release: Tor Browser 10.5a4

    Tor Browser 10.5a4 is now available from the Tor Browser Alpha download page and also from our distribution directory.

    Note: This is an alpha release, an experimental version for users who want to help us test new features. For everyone else, we recommend downloading the latest stable release for desktop or Android instead.

  • Firefox Nightly: These Weeks in Firefox: Issue 83

    Started investigation into making BrowserNotification look more part of chrome to eventually use as a UI for remote messages (in addition to CFR and what’s new, etc)

Announcing Rust 1.48.0

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Development
Moz/FF

The Rust team is happy to announce a new version of Rust, 1.48.0. Rust is a programming language that is empowering everyone to build reliable and efficient software.

If you have a previous version of Rust installed via rustup, getting Rust 1.48.0 is as easy as...

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Also: Rust 1.48.0 released

Mozilla and Tor: Release and Greenwashing

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Moz/FF
  • Tor Browser 10.0.5

    Tor is a network of virtual tunnels that allows people and groups to improve their privacy and security on the Internet. The Tor software protects you by bouncing your communications around a distributed network of relays run by volunteers all around the world: it prevents somebody from watching your Internet connection and learning what sites you visit, it prevents the sites you visit from learning your physical location, and it lets you access sites which are blocked.

    The Tor Browser Bundle lets you use Tor on Windows, Mac OS X, or Linux without needing to install any software. It can run off a USB flash drive, comes with a pre-configured web browser to protect your anonymity, and is self-contained.

  • Release: Mozilla’s Greenhouse Gas emissions baseline - The Mozilla Blog

    Today, we are releasing our baseline Greenhouse Gas emissions (GHG) assessment for 2019, which forms the basis upon which we will build to reduce and mitigate Mozilla’s organisational impact.

    [...]

    Their impact is significant, and it is an approximation. We can’t yet really measure the energy required to run and use our products specifically. Instead, we are estimating how much power is required to use the devices needed to access our products for the time that we know people spent on our products. In other words, we estimate the impact of desktop computers, laptops, tablets, or phones while being online overall.

    For now, this helps us get a sense of the impact the internet is having on the environment. Going forward, we need to figure out how to reduce that share while continuing to grow and make the web open and accessible to all.

    The emissions related to our business services and operations cover all other categories from the GHG protocol that are applicable to Mozilla.

    For 2019, this includes 10 offices and 6 co-locations, purchased goods and services, events that we either host or run, all of our commercial travel including air, rail, ground transportation, and hotels, as well as estimates of the impact of our remote workforce and the commute of our office employees, which we gathered through an internal survey.

Mozilla Thunderbird 78.5 Released with More OpenPGP Improvements

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Moz/FF

Mozilla Thunderbird 78.5 is all about improving the best feature of the 78 series, OpenPGP support, which is now built into the application and enabled by default to let users send encrypted emails.

In this version, OpenPGP gains a new option that let users disable the attaching of the public key to a signed email, improved support for inline PGP messages, as well as a fix for the message security dialog to no longer display unverified keys as unavailable.

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Firefox 84 Promises to Finally Enable WebRender By Default on Linux/X11

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Moz/FF

While some of you are still discovering the new features and improvements in Firefox 83, Mozilla is already working on the next major version of the popular and open-source web browser, Firefox 84, which promises to finally enable the WebRender feature by default on Linux.

Written in Rust, the WebRender feature in Firefox makes the entire web browser faster when surfing the Internet. While WebRender is known for being extremely fast, it also makes Firefox more stable and smoother.

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Mozilla Outsourcing to Microsoft Proprietary Software via 'Linux' Foundation

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Moz/FF
  • The Servo Blog: Servo’s new home

    The Servo Project is excited to announce that it has found a new home with the Linux Foundation. Servo was incubated inside Mozilla, and served as the proof that important web components such as CSS and rendering could be implemented in Rust, with all its safety, concurrency and speed. Now it’s time for Servo to leave the nest!

  • Servo Project Joins The Linux Foundation Fold

    The Linux Foundation today announced at KubeKon that it is hosting the Servo web engine, an open-source, high-performance browser engine. "Servo is the most promising, modern, and open web engine for building applications and immersive experiences using web technologies," according to Mike Dolan, senior vice president and general manager of projects at the Linux Foundation. The post Servo Project Joins The Linux Foundation Fold appeared first on LinuxInsider.

  • Open Source Web Engine Servo to be Hosted at Linux Foundation

    The Linux Foundation, the nonprofit organization enabling mass innovation through open source, today announced it will host the Servo web engine. Servo is an open source, high-performance browser engine designed for both application and embedded use and is written in the Rust programming language, bringing lightning-fast performance and memory safety to browser internals. Industry support for this move is coming from Futurewei, Let’s Encrypt, Mozilla, Samsung, and Three.js, among others.

    “The Linux Foundation’s track record for hosting and supporting the world’s most ubiquitous open source technologies makes it the natural home for growing the Servo community and increasing its platform support,” said Alan Jeffrey, Technical Chair of the Servo project. “There’s a lot of development work and opportunities for our Servo Technical Steering Committee to consider, and we know this cross-industry open source collaboration model will enable us to accelerate the highest priorities for web developers.”

  • Mozilla Punts Servo Web Engine Development To The Linux Foundation

    Ever since the mass layoffs at Mozilla earlier this year and some Mozilla projects in jeopardy many have been wondering: what about Servo? Well, today it's heading off to the Linux Foundation.

    Mozilla and the Linux Foundation are jointly announcing this morning that the Servo web engine development will now be hosted by the Linux Foundation.

    The Rust-written code-base that's served as a long in development "next-gen" web engine at Mozilla will now be developed under the Linux Foundation umbrella. Besides Mozilla, this move has the support of other industry stakeholders like Samsung and Let's Encrypt.

  • Linux Foundation: We'll host Mozilla's Rust programming language-based Servo web engine

    The latest open-source project to be hosted on the Linux Foundation is Servo, the experimental web engine developed at cash-strapped Mozilla.

Firefox 83 Released With Warp'ed JavaScript, HTTPS-Only Mode Option

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Moz/FF

Firefox 83.0 is now shipping as a notable update to the Mozilla web browser and this time around are some exciting changes.

Most notable with Firefox 83 is the SpiderMonkey "Warp" upgrade aiming to deliver better website responsiveness and other real-world JavaScript performance improvements. Mozilla describes the Warp benefits as "improved page load performance by up to 15%, page responsiveness by up to 12%, and reduced memory usage by up to 8%. We have replaced part of the JavaScript engine that helps to compile and display websites for you, improving security and maintainability of the engine at the same time."

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Direct:83.0
Firefox Release

Also: Firefox 83 Arrives with HTTPS-Only Mode, PDF Form Filling + More

Firefox 84 will be the last version with NPAPI plugin support

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Moz/FF

Mozilla plans to remove support for so-called NPAPI plugins in Firefox 85 according to a post by Jim Mathies, Senior Engineering Manager, to the Mozilla Dev Platform group.

Mozilla dropped support for all NPAPI plugins except for Adobe Flash when it released Firefox 52 in March 2017. NPAPI allowed the browser to integrate plugins to add support for content such as Silverlight or Java to the Firefox web browser.

When Adobe announced that it would stop supporting Adobe Flash at the end of 2020, it was clear that Mozilla would not only disable support for Adobe Flash in Firefox but remove the entire NPAPI codebase from the browser.

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Mozilla Firefox 83 Is Now Available for Download with HTTPS-Only Mode, Improvements

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Moz/FF

The biggest new change in the Mozilla Firefox 83 release appears to be a new security feature called HTTPS-Only Mode, which is implemented in Preferences, under the Privacy & Security section. It provides a secure and encrypted connection between your web browser and the websites you visit, even if they don't use HTTPS.

By default it's disabled, but when enabled, the HTTPS-Only Mode will upgrade all your website connections to use Secure HTTP (HTTPS). The good news is that it can be used in all windows or only on private windows.

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Mozilla: Tor Browser, CAs and Rust Shuffling on Microsoft's Servers

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Moz/FF
  • New Release: Tor Browser 10.5a3

    Tor Browser 10.5a3 for Desktop platforms is now available from the Tor Browser Alpha download page and also from our distribution directory.

    Note: This is an alpha release, an experimental version for users who want to help us test new features. For everyone else, we recommend downloading the latest stable release instead.

  • Preloading Intermediate CA Certificates into Firefox - Mozilla Security Blog

    Throughout 2020, Firefox users have been seeing fewer secure connection errors while browsing the Web. We’ve been improving connection errors overall for some time, and a new feature called Intermediate Certificate Authority (CA) Preloading is our latest innovation. This technique reduces connection errors that users encounter when web servers forget to properly configure their TLS security.

    In essence, Firefox pre-downloads all trusted Web Public Key Infrastructure (PKI) intermediate CA certificates into Firefox via Mozilla’s Remote Settings infrastructure. This way, Firefox users avoid seeing an error page for one of the most common server configuration problems: not specifying proper intermediate CA certificates.

    For Intermediate CA Preloading to work, we need to be able to enumerate every intermediate CA certificate that is part of the trusted Web PKI. As a result of Mozilla’s leadership in the CA community, each CA in Mozilla’s Root Store Policy is required to disclose these intermediate CA certificates to the multi-browser Common CA Database (CCADB). Consequently, all of the relevant intermediate CA certificates are available via the CCADB reporting mechanisms. Given this information, we periodically synthesize a list of these intermediate CA certificates and place them into Remote Settings. Currently the list contains over two thousand entries.

    When Firefox receives the list for the first time (or later receives updates to the list), it enumerates the entries in batches and downloads the corresponding intermediate CA certificates in the background. The list changes slowly, so once a copy of Firefox has completed the initial downloads, it’s easy to keep it up-to-date. The list can be examined directly using your favorite JSON tooling at this URL: https://firefox.settings.services.mozilla.com/v1/buckets/security-state/collections/intermediates/records

    For details on processing the records, see the Kinto Attachment plugin for Kinto, used by Firefox Remote Settings.

    Certificates provided via Intermediate CA Preloading are added to a local cache and are not imbued with trust. Trust is still derived from the standard Web PKI algorithms.

  • Robert O'Callahan: rr Repository Moved To Independent Organisation

    There have been no changes in intellectual property ownership. rr contributions made by Mozilla employees and contractors remain copyrighted by Mozilla. I will always be extremely grateful for the investment Mozilla made to create rr!

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