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openSUSE Utah Open Source Conference wrap-up

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SUSE

zonker.opensuse.org: If you weren’t in Salt Lake City last week for the Utah Open Source Conference (UTOSC), you missed out big time! UTOSC was one heck of a community show, and it seemed like all who attended had a really good time.

About the openSUSE Board and the Elections

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SUSE

dev-loki.blogspot: As you have probably already read, the openSUSE Election Committee has taken over and finalized a process and page about the upcoming openSUSE Board Elections. These are drawn on the preliminary work of the current Board and the community itself.

Novell’s Linux Business is Booming

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SUSE

practical-tech.com: On a superficial level, Novell’s third quarter, which ended July 31, 2008, didn’t look that good. A closer look reveals though that Novell did quite well in general and extremely well with its Linux business.

Interview With Joe Brockmeier - OpenSUSE Community Manager At Novell

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Interviews
SUSE

howsoftwareisbuilt.com: In this interview we talk with Joe. In specific, we talk about: Where openSUSE fits into the desktop Linux landscape, Relationships between openSUSE and SUSE Linux Enterprise Server and upstream projects, The effect of commercial agreements on open source projects, and more.

Choosing a Desktop Environment for SUSE Linux

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SUSE

computingtech.blogspot: With Windows and the Macintosh, the desktop is just that—the desktop. Linux is all about choices, and so is X, KDE or GNOME. One of the cool things is that you can remain indecisive your whole life.

Novell's third-quarter loss widens, but Linux booms by 30 percent

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SUSE

cnet.com: Novell beat Wall Street's estimates with a solid third quarter, but the real story is in its continued Linux growth. The company reported that annual adjusted operating margin to be between eight to ten percent, up from earlier expected seven to nine percent. So, things are looking up.

Also: CIOs: Finally Falling for Novell Again?

openSUSE Weekly News, Issue 36

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SUSE

Issue #36 of openSUSE Weekly News is now out! In this week’s issue: Hack Week III, openSUSE Election Committee Founded, and openSUSE at Utah Open Source Conference.

IT veteran achieves perfect Zen through open source

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Interviews
SUSE

independent.ie: Utah software company Novell employs 150 people in Dublin. The advent of open source software, particularly Linux, gave this long-standing IT giant a new lease of life. Ron Hovsepian is the company’s CEO.

Review: openSuse 11.0 (and KDE 4)

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SUSE

ericsbinaryworld.com/blog: I’ve never used Suse or openSuse. I’ve been a “loyal” Fedora user since Fedora Core 1 and I have Ubuntu on my laptop since it had awesome laptop support. It’s been a few years and nothing horrible has happened because of the Microsoft pact and it came as a liveDVD in the latest Linux Format Magazine.

Also: On openSUSE, sorta

A video tour of openSUSE 11 (with KDE 4 desktop)

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SUSE

linux.com: SUSE has been around almost since the dawn of consumer-level desktop Linux, and openSUSE 11 upholds the SUSE reputation for having not just a wide range of available applications, but also excellent documentation and a fine user-to-user support community. For this video we chose the KDE 4.x desktop option. KDE 3.5x and GNOME are also available as defaults in openSUSE.

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Why we use open source - Australia’s Immigration agency explains

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