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SUSE

SUSE Leftovers

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SUSE

More on SUSE, Mirantis, Red Hat, and OpenStack

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SUSE

openSUSE Tumbleweed Linux Users Get LibreOffice 5.2 and Wireshark 2.0.5, More

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SUSE

Today, August 10, 2016, openSUSE's Douglas DeMaio has informed the openSUSE Tumbleweed community about the new software versions that landed in the snapshots released last week.

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Mirantis, Red Hat, and SUSE

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GNU
Linux
Red Hat
Server
SUSE
  • Mirantis Sidesteps Red Hat Resistance To Rival OpenStack Software Running On Its Dominant Linux, Red Hat Calls Foul

    For a pure-play OpenStack software vendor like Mirantis, not being able to deploy your cloud-building software on servers running the world's most-popular distribution of the Linux operating system terribly limits your addressable market.

    That's why Mirantis has been trying for years to strike a partnership with Red Hat, which was an early strategic investor in Mirantis. But the open-source software giant offers its own OpenStack distribution—and maintains that version is the only one precisely engineered for integration with its operating system.

    Mirantis' repeated attempts to reach an agreement to certify and support its product to run on Red Hat Enterprise Linux (RHEL) have all fizzled.

  • Mirantis Partners with SUSE to Deliver Complete Enterprise Linux Support

    Mirantis, the pure-play OpenStack company, and SUSE®, a pioneer in Linux and open source solutions, today announced a joint collaboration to offer Mirantis OpenStack customers support for enterprise Linux. Both companies will collaborate technically to establish SUSE Linux Enterprise Server as a development platform for use with Mirantis OpenStack. The companies will also collaborate to support Red Hat Enterprise Linux and CentOS, making Mirantis a one-stop shop for OpenStack support on the leading enterprise Linux distributions.

SUSE and Mirantis to Offer Full Enterprise Linux Support for SLES, RHEL & CentOS

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SUSE

Today, August 9, 2016, SUSE, the company behind the powerful SUSE Linux Enterprise Desktop (SLED) and SUSE Linux Enterprise Server (SLES) operating systems, announced that it partners with Mirantis, the pure-play OpenStack company, for providing full enterprise Linux support.

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openSUSE Tumbleweed GNU/Linux Operating System Now Powered by Linux Kernel 4.7

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SUSE

A new openSUSE Tumbleweed snapshot has been released on the day of August 4, 2016, bringing various updated packages among which we can mention the recently announced Linux 4.7 kernel.

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openSUSE Tumbleweed Users Get Latest KDE Goodies, Linux Kernel 4.7 Coming Soon

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SUSE

Today, July 27, 2016, openSUSE Project's Douglas DeMaio has informed the Tumbleweed community about the latest software updates that landed recently in the main software repositories of the rolling release operating system.

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SUSE Leftovers

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SUSE
  • Newest Tumbleweed snapshot updates KDE Applications

    The latest openSUSE Tumbleweed snapshot has updated KDE Applications in the repositories to version 16.04.3.

    Snapshot 20160724 had a considerably large amount of package updates for Tumbleweed KDE users, but other updates in the snapshot included updates to kiwi-config-openSUSE, Libzypp to version 16.1.3, yast2-installation to version 3.1.202 and Kernel-firmware to 2016071

  • Highlights of YaST development sprint 22

    openSUSE Conference’16, Hackweek 14 and the various SUSE internal workshops are over. So it’s time for the YaST team to go back to usual three-weeks-long development sprints… and with new sprints come new public reports!

    With Leap 42.2 in Alpha phase and SLE12-SP2 in Beta phase our focus is on bugs fixing, so we don’t have as much fancy stuff to show in this report. Still, here you are some bits you could find interesting.

SUSE Leftovers

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SUSE
  • Machinery Team: Navigating your Linux system descriptions the pretty way

    Starting from version 1.21.0 you'll experience an improved graphical user interface, where show and compare views are connected. With this you can navigate between viewing different descriptions as well as comparing them, so working with multiple system descriptions is much faster and offers greater usability.

    When you start the graphical user interface you will get a list of all available system descriptions, where you can choose one to view more details. The following screen shot shows this list. You can use the search mask to filter them for certain terms. Simply click on the description you would like to see and it will get you to the details view. Run the command `machinery list --html` to get to the list view.

  • SUSE Studio enabled Microsoft Azure image type for SLES 12

    We are happy to announce that Azure image type has been enabled for SUSE Linux Enterprise 12 SP1 appliances. From now on you can build and upload SLE12 SP1 based appliances in the Microsoft Azure Cloud.

openSUSE Leap 42.2 Now Merged with SUSE Linux Enterprise 12 Service Pack 2

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SUSE

The development cycle of the openSUSE Leap 42.2 operating system continues, and today we would like to inform our readers about the availability of the third and last Alpha build in the series.

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today's leftovers

FOSS in the European Union

  • Competition authorities first to implement DMS services
    The DRS are published as open source software using the European Union’s open source software licence EUPL, and are available on Joinup. The software provides connectors for most commonly-used document management systems, and includes scripts to create a database to implement the connecting web services.
  • Czech Republic is at the forefront of an open data international project
    With the beginning of the new year, an international project “Open crowdsourcing data related to the quality of service of high-speed Internet” was launched, which aims to encourage the development of open data in the user’s measurement of high-speed Internet.

Arch Linux News

  • Linux Top 3: Arch Anywhere, Bitkey and Vinux
    Arch Linux is a powerful rolling Linux distribution, that hasn't always been particularly easy for new users to install and deploy. The goal of the Arch Anywhere system is to provide new and old users with the ability to install a fully custom Arch Linux system in minutes.
  • Arch Linux Preparing To Deprecate i686 Support
    Arch Linux is moving ahead with preparing to deprecate i686 (x86 32-bit) support in their distribution. Due to declining usage of Arch Linux i686, they will be phasing out official support for the architecture. Next month's ISO spin will be the last for offering a 32-bit Arch Linux install. Following that will be a nine month deprecation period where i686 packages will still see updates.
  • News draft for i686 deprecation
    Finally found some time to write a draft for news post on i686. Here it is: Title: i686 is dead, long live i686 Due to the decreasing popularity of i686 among the developers and the community, we have decided to phase out the support of this architecture. The decision means that February ISO will be the last that allows to install 32 bit Arch Linux. The next 9 months are deprecation period, during which i686 will be still receiving upgraded packages. Starting from November 2017, packaging and repository tools will no longer require that from maintainers, effectively making i686 unsupported. However, as there is still some interest in keeping i686 alive, we would like to encourage the community to make it happen with our guidance. Depending on the demand, an official channel and mailing list will be created for second tier architectures.

LinuxCon Europe on 100G Networking

  • The World of 100G Networking
    Capacity and speed requirements keep increasing for networking, but going from where are now to 100G networking isn’t a trivial matter, as Christopher Lameter and Fernando Garcia discussed recently in their LinuxCon Europe talk about the world of 100G networking. It may not be easy, but with recently developed machine learning algorithms combined with new, more powerful servers, the idea of 100G networking is becoming feasible and cost effective.
  • The World of 100G Networking by Christoph Lameter
    The idea of 100G networking is becoming feasible and cost effective. This talk gives an overview about the competing technologies in terms of technological differences and capabilities and then discusses the challenges of using various kernel interfaces to communicate at these high speeds.