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SUSE

openSUSE Tumbleweed News

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SUSE
  • openSUSE Tumbleweed – Review of the Week 2016/46

    Now this is a week I call fully rolling. There was a full 7 snapshots since the last review – which is about the maximum we can do in a week with one snapshot per day (or we have to change the versioning to not be only ‘date’ based). So, this review is about the snapshots {20161110..20161116}.

  • When Trying Out Tumbleweed, It's Easy To See Why OpenSUSE Leap Disabled Nouveau

    I've been running some fresh benchmarks of the recently released openSUSE Leap 42.2 compared to the rolling-release openSUSE Tumbleweed and friends. Those benchmarks will be posted shortly, but after using the Nouveau experience on Tumbleweed I found the need to comment.

SUSE Leftovers

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SUSE
  • openSUSE Leap 42.2 Linux Now Officially Available for PowerPC64le Architectures

    Just one day after the official release of the openSUSE Leap 42.2 operating system, Michel Normand from the openSUSE Project was proud to announce on November 17, 2016, the availability of the PowerPC port.

    Yes, you're reading that right, while many other popular GNU/Linux distributions are in discussions to deprecate support for the PowerPC (PPC) hardware architecture, including Debian Project and Canonical for their upcoming Debian GNU/Linux 9 "Stretch" and Ubuntu 17.04 (Zesty Zapus) releases, it looks like openSUSE still support it.

  • Organize an openSUSE Leap 42.2 Release Party

    Having a party to celebrate an achievement is always great and the openSUSE community knows how to party; just look at all the fun we have at openSUSE conferences and summits.

    With the release of openSUSE Leap 42.2, a release party is in order. Selecting a good date and having some goodies to pass out to the party requires some planning. The checklist below can help with planning the release party, but the most important thing if you plan on having a party is to email ddemaio (at) suse.de well before the party to get some open-source goodies to give away. Please include “Leap 42.2” Party in the subject line and include a mailing address.

  • Preparing for openSUSE 42.2

openSUSE 13.2 Linux Operating System to Reach End of Life on January 16, 2017

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SUSE

On November 17, 2016, it appears that Marcus Meissner from the openSUSE Project sent an advanced discontinuation notice for users of the openSUSE 13.2 Linux operating system.

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Enterprise Linux Showdown: SUSE Linux

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Linux
SUSE

SUSE combines tried and tested tools and build methodologies that make this Linux offering a favorite in corporate environments. At the same time, and thanks to openSUSE and the online services built around it, SUSE Linux can also be daring and exciting. Although it has had low points over its long history, the Linux community is lucky that SUSE Linux is still with us and still going strong.

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SUSE releases SUSE Linux Enterprise 12 Service Pack 2

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SUSE

While I was off fighting viruses, SUSE released an update to its SUSE Linux Enterprise 12, a popular business Linux operating environment. The focus of this service pack appears to be accelerating network performance, enhancing support for SAP applications and HANA, improving support for IBM Power architecture systems and other important improvements.

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  • openSUSE Leap 42.2 Officially Released, Includes GNOME 3.20 & KDE Plasma 5.8 LTS

    The openSUSE Project had the pleasure of informing Softpedia today, November 16, 2016, about the general availability of the openSUSE Leap 42.2 operating system for personal computers.

    Designed to offer users only well-established Open Source and GNU/Linux technologies, and built using the source code from the recently released SUSE Enterprise Linux (SLE) 12 Service Pack 2 (SP2) operating system, the second major update to the openSUSE Leap 42 open-source and free distribution is here after being in development for the past six months. There are numerous new features and updated components in openSUSE Leap 42.2, some of which Tumbleweed users are already enjoying.

  • Optimal Release for Linux Professionals Arrives with openSUSE Leap 42.2

    Members of the openSUSE Project are pleased to announce the release of the next minor version of Leap; openSUSE Leap 42.2! Leap is made to give stability-minded users and conservative technology adopters peace of mind. openSUSE Leap 42.2 is powered by the Linux 4.4 Long-Term-Support (LTS) kernel and is a secure, stable and reliable server operating system for deploying IT services in physical, virtual or cloud environments.

    A selective process of including well-established packages in openSUSE Leap 42.2 gives new meaning to the term Linux Optimization; openSUSE Leap is simply the safe choice that offers Linux professionals a user-friendly desktop and a feature-rich server environment.

  • OpenSUSE Leap 42.2 Arrives

    Hitting the web this morning is the official release of openSUSE Leap 42.2.

    OpenSUSE Leap 42.2 makes use of the older Linux 4.4 kernel due to its LTS status, makes use of the KDE Plasma 5.8 desktop by default, and a wide variety of other package updates. OpenSUSE Leap 42.2 continues to be derived from SUSE Linux Enterprise.

SUSE advances its open-source storage system

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SUSE

Besides announcing its next version of Ceph-powered SUSE Enterprise Storage, SUSE has bought openATTIC, the open-source Ceph and storage management framework.

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SUSE Leftovers

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SUSE

SUSE Linux Enterprise 12 Service Pack 2 arrives

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SUSE

SUSE has long been a business Linux for business. With the arrival of SUSE Linux Enterprise (SLES) 12 Service Pack 2 , the first major update since last year, SUSE is staying the corporate Linux course.

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Tyson Foods Honored as SUSE Customer of the Year

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SUSE

Every year, SUSE honors 4 companies worldwide, one in each region of the globe: Latin America, APAC, EMEA and North America. Recipient companies are recognized for “defining the future:” using SUSE open source solutions for IT transformation, increased business agility and continuity. 2016 award recipients are :

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SUSE Leftovers

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SUSE
  • SUSE plans container as a service platform

    Germany-based SUSE Linux has announced a container as a service platform that it hopes to release as a public beta in April next year, before the first customer version comes out in July the same year.

    Three of the developers involved — Federica Teodori, project manager for container and orchestration, Andreas Jaeger, senior product manager, and Simona Arsene, product manager — spoke to iTWire about the technology on the sidelines of SUSECon 2016, the company's annual conference that is being held in Washington DC this week.

    Jaeger said the idea was to have a software-defined infrastructure where containers handled the workloads. The advantage was that containers, which include an application and its dependencies, could be moved around and could run from more than one location.

  • SUSE Deal Includes Ceph Storage Project
  • SUSE Growing Linux Biz Revenue at 18 percent in 2016

    According to Brauckmann, the fastest-growing route to market for SUSE now is the public cloud.

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More in Tux Machines

Red Hat: British Army Deal, Hyperconverged Infrastructure, OpenShift, Soaring Share Price, and Fedora

today's howtos

Servers: Infrakit & LinuxKit, CMTL, ServiceMaster, Synology, Ubuntu, and NeuVector

  • Why Infrakit & LinuxKit are better together for Building Immutable Infrastructure?
    Let us accept the fact – “Managing Docker on different Infrastructure is still difficult and not portable”. While working on Docker for Mac, AWS, GCP & Azure, Docker Team realized the need for a standard way to create and manage infrastructure state that was portable across any type of infrastructure, from different cloud providers to on-prem. One serious challenge is that each vendor has differentiated IP invested in how they handle certain aspects of their cloud infrastructure. It is not enough to just provision n-number of servers;what IT ops teams need is a simple and consistent way to declare the number of servers, what size they should be, and what sort of base software configuration is required. Also, in the case of server failures (especially unplanned), that sudden change needs to be reconciled against the desired state to ensure that any required servers are re-provisioned with the necessary configuration. Docker Team introduced and open sourced “InfraKit” last year to solve these problems and to provide the ability to create a self healing infrastructure for distributed systems.
  • CMTL Testing First Linux Based Intel® Server Board
    The board is designed for HPC workload environments requiring parallel computing processing performance. Up to 72 cores for optional support and 100Gb/s node interconnect. Six slots for DDR4, 2400Mhz registered ECC DIMMS to achieve a capacity of 384G.
  • [Older] DNS Infrastructure at GitHub
    At GitHub we recently revamped how we do DNS from the ground up. This included both how we interact with external DNS providers and how we serve records internally to our hosts. To do this, we had to design and build a new DNS infrastructure that could scale with GitHub’s growth and across many data centers.
  • ServiceMaster polishes DevOps process for Linux container security
    ServiceMaster Global Holdings Inc., which owns consumer brands such as Terminix, Merry Maids, Furniture Medic and ServiceMaster Clean and Restore, deploys 75,000 service trucks to residential driveways each day. Five years ago, the company was taken private by an equity firm, and new leadership, including a new CIO, was brought in to modernize its operations. When it returned to the public market in 2014, the company had completely overhauled its approach to IT.
  • My Love Affair with Synology
    In my "Hodge Podge" article in the October 2016 issue, I mentioned how much I love the Synology NAS I have in my server closet (Figure 1). I got quite a few email messages from people—some wanting more information, some scolding me for not rolling my own NAS, and some asking me what on earth I need with that much storage. Oddly, the Linux-running Synology NAS has become one of my main server machines, and it does far more than just store data. Because so many people wanted more information, I figured I'd share some of the cool things I do with my Synology.
  • Certified Ubuntu Cloud Guest – The best of Ubuntu on the best clouds
    Ubuntu has a long history in the cloud. It is the number one guest operating system on AWS, Azure and Google Cloud Platform. In fact there are more Ubuntu images running in the public cloud than all other operating systems combined. Ubuntu is a free operating system which means anyone can download an image, whenever they want. So why should cloud providers offer certified Ubuntu images to their customers?
  • Cloud Foundry and Kubernetes: Different Tools
    It’s difficult to compare programming languages and platforms, of course, but this was the analogy that most frequently came to mind last week. Cloud Foundry is unlikely to be as popular as it was shortly after it launched, when it was the only open source PaaS platform available. But this says little about Cloud Foundry, and more about the platform market which – like every other infrastructure market – is exploding with choice to the point of being problematic. It also ignores the ability for the Cloud Foundry foundation to actively embrace this choice via the addition of Kubo.
  • Ubuntu OpenStack Pike Milestone 2
    The Ubuntu OpenStack team is pleased to announce the general availability of the OpenStack Pike b2 milestone in Ubuntu 17.10 and for Ubuntu 16.04 LTS via the Ubuntu Cloud Archive.
  • NeuVector Releases Open Source Tools to Help Enterprises Evaluate Kubernetes 1.6 Deployments for CIS Benchmark Compliance

Chromebook Dual Boot How-to: Ubuntu 17.04 GNOME and Chrome OS

Last year when I got my Acer Chromebook 11 (C740), I wrote a tutorial to teach you guys how to remove Google Chrome OS and install a GNU/Linux distribution of your choice, but things got boring. Read more