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SUSE

openSUSE Tumbleweed Is in Need of Workers, No New Snapshots Will Be Released

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SUSE

Instead of reporting what has been included in the latest snapshots released a few days ago for the rolling openSUSE Tumbleweed operating system, Douglas DeMaio writes about the fact that there are not enough workers to get the automated testing of openQA running at maximum capacity.

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SUSE Leftovers

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SUSE
  • openSUSE Conference returns to Nuremberg

    The openSUSE Conference will return to Nuremberg June 22 – 26 and have its conference at a cultural center in the heart of the Bavarian city.

    This year’s oSC will take place at the Z Bau, which was a former military barracks before being converted into a cultural center in 2014.

  • Sugar on openSUSE

    Built openSUSE Leap based Sugar test images on SUSE Studio, get it from here.

  • Tumbleweed waits for workers

    openSUSE’s rolling distribution Tumbleweed goes through automated tests before a snapshot is released and heavily relies on openQA for the process of Tumbleweed to create regular snapshots.

    [...]

    The automated testing of openQA is currently running with only two workers left instead of the usual 10. The remaining workers are largely overloaded and can’t cope with the workload to produce new snapshots.

openSUSE Tumbleweed Users Get systemd 228, GCC 5.3.1, Firefox 44.0, and New YaST

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SUSE

openSUSE's Douglas DeMaio writes today, February 10, in a lengthy blog post about the fact that the openSUSE Tumbleweed rolling release operating system received no less than four snapshots this week with dozens of updated packages.

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openSUSE 13.1 Linux Has Reached End of Life, Evergreen Team Takes Over

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SUSE

All good things must come to an end, and so SUSE and the openSUSE Linux community today, February 3, 2016, announced that they will no longer support the openSUSE 13.1 operating system.

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SUSE Leftovers

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SUSE
  • SUSE and Others Find That Public Clouds Aren't Getting Smacked By Private Ones

    A wave of new survey results is coming in, and the numbers make a clear case that the open cloud is going to remain one of the biggest tech stories of 2016. Not all of the results are totally rosy, though. There is brand new evidence that a lack of workers with OpenStack skills may be holding the cloud platform back, especially at enterprises. SUSE LLC’s survey on OpenStack adoption trends reports that over eighty percent of enterprises are either planning to, or have already, implemented OpenStack as a cloud computing solution within their organizations. That means the need and desire is there. However, more than half of all organizations that have tried to deploy OpenStack say they’ve failed to do so due to a lack of skills.

  • YaST Team: Highlights of development sprint 14

    Another three weeks period and another report from the YaST Team (if you don’t know what we are talking about, see highlights of sprint 13 and the presentation post). This was actually a very productive sprint although, as usual, not all changes have such an obvious impact on final users, at least in the short term.

  • openSUSE News: New openSUSE Board Elected

    The campaign is over; the votes are counted and three members of the openSUSE community will lead the overall project on the openSUSE Board.

    Tomáš Chvátal, Gertjan Lettink, and Bryan Lunduke take the helm with the existing board members of Michal Hrušecký, Kostas Koudaras and chairman Richard Brown.

Tumbleweed delivers several KDE updates

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KDE
SUSE

Last week’s updates to Tumbleweed brought several new packages to openSUSE’s rolling release like Kmail 5, KDE Framework 5.18.0 and updates to Perl and YaST.

This week’s snapshot has KDE Applications 15.12.1, which contains only bugfixes and translation updates, and the virtual globe and world atlas Marble updated to from 15.08.3 to the 15.12.1 version.

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SUSE Leftovers

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SUSE

Building Custom Appliances with SUSE Studio

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SUSE
HowTos

Once again, we come to the end just when the party is really starting. It costs nothing but time to try out SUSE Studio, and the excellent documentation will help you over rough spots and show you advanced features.

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openSUSE: Microsoft, Tumbleweed, and Summer of Code

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SUSE
  • Ubuntu, Microsoft, Tizen & More…

    These days, Microsoft doesn’t need SUSE anymore, partly because the once number two Linux distro has fallen way down on the list of popular Linux distros, partly due to the old Novell’s ineptitude and partly because of the deal with Microsoft, which as you might imagine, didn’t sit well in FOSS circles. These days, behind the practically-one-and-the-same one-two punch that RHEL/CentOS brings to the enterprise table, there’s a new number two in Unbutu, with Canonical seemingly intent on replacing the old Novell in the we’ll-sleep-with-Microsoft-if-it-keeps-the-rent-paid department.

    Actually, Ubuntu seems to be a cheaper date than SUSE ever was. We’re not hearing anything about millions upon millions of dollars being poured into the Isle of Man the way Microsoft poured money into Utah back when Novell was still hoping for a Netware comeback. Nor are we hearing about Redmond buying thousands of support contracts to sell give away to it’s customers. What we are hearing is partnership after partnership after partnership between the company that loves Linux and the distro that thinks it is Linux.

  • openSUSE Tumbleweed – Review of the week 2016/2

    Another week – some new snapshots: 5 to be precise (0108, 0110, 0111, 0112 and 0113 will hit the mirrors soon). Sadly, the automatic snapshot announcements did no go out since 0111, something we will be looking at next week and then resume to automatic announcements of new snapshots.

  • openSUSE expands outreach for Google Summer of Code

    The community of openSUSE is expanding its outreach efforts to get more involvement from students and mentors to participate in the Google Summer of Code.

    Members of the community have been working with University of Applied Science in Nuremberg to encourage interest Free Open Source Software, openSUSE and GSoC.

openSUSE Tumbleweed Receives KDE Plasma 5.5.2, Framework 5.17.0, and Apps 5.12.0

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SUSE

Earlier today, January 10, 2016, Dominique Leuenberger from the openSUSE Project had the great pleasure of publishing details about the latest snapshots released in the last weeks for the Tumbleweed branch of the openSUSE Linux operating system.

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today's howtos

Linux Graphics

  • The RADV Radeon Vulkan Linux Driver Continues Picking Up Features
  • OpenChrome Maintainer Making Some Progress On VIA DRM Driver
    Independent developer Kevin Brace took over maintaining the OpenChrome DDX driver earlier this year to improve the open-source VIA Linux graphics support while over the summer he's slowly been getting up to speed on development of the OpenChrome DRM driver. The OpenChrome DRM driver was making progress while James Simmons was developing it a few years back, but since he left the project, it's been left to bit rot. It will take a lot of work even to get this previously "good" code back to working on the latest Linux 4.x mainline kernels given how DRM core interfaces have evolved in recent times.
  • My talk about Mainline Explicit Fencing at XDC 2016!
    Last week I was at XDC in Helsinki where I presented about the Explicit Fencing work we’ve been doing on the Mainline Linux Kernel in the lastest few months. There was a livestream of all presentations during the conference and recorded sections are available. You can check the video of my presentation. Check out the slides too.

Linux Kernel News

  • Linux 4.8 gets rc8
    Chill, penguin-fanciers: Linux lord Linus Torvalds is sitting on the egg that is Linux 4.8 for another week. As Torvalds indicated last week, this version of the kernel still needs work and therefore earned itself an eighth release candidate.
  • Linux 4.8-rc8 Released: Linux 4.8 Next Weekend
  • Linux Kernel 4.7.5 Released with Numerous ARM and Networking Improvements
    The fifth maintenance update to the Linux 4.7 kernel series, which is currently the most advanced, secure and stable kernel branch you can get for your GNU/Linux operating system, has been announced by Greg Kroah-Hartman. Linux kernel 4.7.5 is here only ten days after the release of the previous maintenance version, namely Linux kernel 4.7.4, and it's a big update that changes a total of 213 files, with 1774 insertions and 971 deletions, which tells us that the kernel developers and hackers had a pretty busy week patching all sorts of bugs and security issues, as well as to add various, much-needed improvements.
  • Blockchain Summit Day Two: End-Of-Conference Highlights From Shanghai
    Financial services firms and startups looking to be the bridge to blockchain ledgers continued to dominate presentations on the second and final day of the Blockchain Summit, ending International Blockchain Week in Shanghai that also saw Devcon2 and a startup demo competition.
  • Testing Various HDDs & SSDs On Ubuntu With The Linux 4.8 Kernel
    Here are some fresh benchmarks of various solid-state drives (SATA 3.0 SSDs plus two NVMe M.2 SSDs) as well as two HDDs for getting a fresh look at how they are performing using the Linux 4.8 Git kernel. After publishing Friday's Intel 600P Series NVME SSD tests of this lower-cost NVM Express storage line-up, I continued testing a few other SSDs and HDDs. These additional reference points are available for your viewing pleasure today. The additional data is also going to be used for reference in a Linux 4.8-based BCache SSD+HDD comparison being published next week. Stay tuned for those fresh BCache numbers.

Behind the GNOME 3.22 Release Video

This is less than usual. The time saving mostly stems from spending less time recording for the release video. At first thought you might think recording would be a breeze but it can be one of the most frustrating aspects of making the videos. Each cycle the GNOME community lands improvement a wide set of GNOME’s applications. So before each release I have to find some way to run a dozen of applications from master. I do this either by: Read more