Language Selection

English French German Italian Portuguese Spanish

SUSE

openSUSE 11.1 Impressions

Filed under
SUSE

wlnelson.blogspot: I've never been a big fan of SuSE/openSUSE in the past. It's always felt like a mixed bag to me. Due to some coursework I need to perform for my university I felt I was best served by a distribution that has a very large package repository.

openSUSE 11.1 KDE4 Reloaded

Filed under
SUSE

opensuse.org: While 11.2 is still months away there’s still plenty of activity going on with openSUSE. In addition to last week’s milestone release, you can also get your hands on openSUSE 11.1 Reloaded. This is a respin of openSUSE 11.1, including KDE 4.2.2 packages and updates to 11.1.

openSUSE Weekly News, Issue 69

Filed under
SUSE

Issue #69 of openSUSE Weekly News is now out! In this week’s issue: openSUSE 11.2 Milestone 1 Released, People of openSUSE: Jan Engelhardt, and Joe Brockmeier: The argument for free fonts.

What’s behind “lzma compressed livecds”

Filed under
SUSE

opensuse.org: There are various ways to build a live cd and since 11.2 Milestone 1 there is a new one: clicfs. I’ll try to explain:

HP debuts ProBook laptops with preinstalled SuSE Linux

Filed under
Hardware
SUSE

blogs.zdnet.com: Hewlett-Packard today announced its new ProBook series of 14-, 15.6- and 17.3-in. laptops intended to merge business functionality, stylish design cues and a (hopefully) low price tag.

Time is ripe for Microsoft to buy Novell

Filed under
Microsoft
SUSE

itwire.com: This week was a historic one for Microsoft with the firm reporting its biggest drop in both quarterly profits and revenue in its 23-year history as a public entity.

People of openSUSE: Jan Engelhardt

Filed under
Interviews
SUSE

opensuse.org: Jan is one of silent community mebers that is active in kernel packaging and development area. Thanks to him openSUSE users have had chance to try stable real time kernel (RT kernel).

openSUSE Weekly News, Issue 68

Filed under
SUSE

Issue #68 of openSUSE Weekly News is now out. In this week’s issue: Call for Participations: openSUSE Summit 2009, openSUSE at LinuxFest Northwest, and People of openSUSE: Jean-Daniel Dodin

How Novell is Killing SuSE Linux

Filed under
SUSE

serversolved.blogspot: I just can't hold back anymore. About five years ago (roughly), Novell acquired the rights to SuSE Linux. They created a set of custom distributions, but their plans beyond that have always been questionable.

Health Check: openSUSE - Then and now

Filed under
SUSE

h-online.com: openSUSE 11.1, the latest community edition of Novell SUSE Linux, was released just in time for Christmas, to largely favourable reviews. openSUSE remains one of the market leaders, and features the latest and greatest stable releases of most of the important packages that make a classic GNU/Linux distribution, but it has had its troubles during recent years.

Syndicate content

More in Tux Machines

Leftovers: Ubuntu

Leftovers: Software

today's howtos

Phoronix on NVIDIA

  • Compute Shader Support Patches For NVIDIA Fermi On Nouveau
    Samuel Pitoiset has published a set of twelve patches for implementing compute shaders support within the Nouveau NVC0 Gallium3D driver for the GeForce 400/500 "Fermi" graphics processors.
  • NVIDIA Posts Latest PRIME Sync Patches On Road To Better Support
    Alex Goins of NVIDIA has spent the past several months working on PRIME synchronization support to fix tearing when using this NVIDIA-popular multi-GPU method. The latest patches were published this week.
  • The Best Graphics Card Brands For NVIDIA/AMD GPUs As A Linux Consumer?
    One of the most frequent topics I'm emailed about is any brand recommendations among NVIDIA and AMD AIB partners for graphics cards. For Linux users, is there a particular brand preference for graphics cards? The short story is, no, there isn't one particular brand when selecting either a GeForce or Radeon graphics card that a Linux gamer/enthusiast should go with over another AIB partner. Over the past 12 years of running Phoronix, there has been no single AIB partner that superbly stands out compared to the rest when it comes to graphics card AIB partner brands like ASUS, Zotac, HIS, MSI, etc. They all work under Linux, rarely the AIB differences extend beyond the heatsink/cooler and any default clock speed differences, and I haven't seen one that's over-the-top crazy about Linux. I also haven't seen any major partner consistently put the Tux logo or other Linux markings on their product packaging, let alone incorporate any Linux drivers onto their CD/DVD driver media.